Catalogue


Limited achievements : Obama's foreign policy /
Zaki Laïdi ; translated by Carolyn Avery.
imprint
New York, N.Y. : Palgrave Macmillan, c2012.
description
xvi, 237 p. : charts ; 23 cm.
ISBN
9781137020857 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
author
imprint
New York, N.Y. : Palgrave Macmillan, c2012.
isbn
9781137020857 (alk. paper)
contents note
Legacy -- White House Tight Rope -- No More Monsters to destroy? -- Repudiating The Ideology of September 11 -- Back From Baghdad -- "Good Enough For Afghanistan" -- Breaking The Pact of Silence? : Obama and The Arab Spring -- Europe : The Downgraded Ally? -- Appendices.
catalogue key
8384586
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Zaki Ladi is a professor of International Relations at Science Po (Paris). He is the author of numerous books including, A World without Meaning, The Great Disruption, and Norms over Force: The Enigma of European Power.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2013-05-01:
Laidi (Sciences Po, France) provides an interesting and nuanced take on President Obama's foreign policy. Drawing on a range of sources, from congressional hearings, press accounts, and interviews to actual outcomes, Laidi argues that Obama's foreign policy is largely rooted in a realist vision of international relations. That is, although Obama, unlike his immediate predecessor, does not flaunt an ambitious grand strategy, he nevertheless, in keeping with precedent, wants to preserve America's great power status--albeit in a more benign and internationally accepted way. Clearly, Obama does not want the US to serve as a global policeman, but neither does the president have any intention of letting America lose its preeminent global position. Overall, Laidi makes a persuasive case. This important and provocative book is a useful addition to the growing literature on post-George W. Bush US foreign policy; it is highly recommended to all students of international relations and contemporary US foreign policy. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All readership levels. S. D. Sharma University of San Francisco
Reviews
Review Quotes
'This outstanding book manages to do something that few other works on Obama's foreign policy have been able to do so far: provide an original and balanced assessment of one of the great transitional moments in American international relationsone in which the United States is finding out that it cannot solve all the world's problems alone but where it is manifestly unwilling to relinquish leadership or power to anyone else. An important and wise study by one of Europe's top observers of the American scene." Michael Cox, co-director of IDEAS, The London School of Economics "With the advantages afforded by his perch on the other side of the Atlantic, Laïdi offers a controversial take on the evolution of US foreign policy on Obama's watch. His book provides a fresh interpretation of recent developments in US statecraft and casts light on where US diplomacy may be headed in the years ahead." Charles A. Kupchan, professor of International Relations, Georgetown University and Whitney H. Shepardson Senior Fellow, Council on Foreign Relations "Limited Achievements is deeply thoughtful, diligently researched, and delightfully readable. Laïdi has developed clear metrics by which to judge Obama's foreign policy, which at times produce surprising results. His core argument is thoroughly convincing. Any serious student of US foreign policy needs to read this book."John Peterson, professor of International Politics, University of Edinburgh
'This outstanding book manages to do something that few other works on Obama's foreign policy have been able to do so far: provide an original and balanced assessment of one of the great transitional moments in American international relationsone in which the United States is finding out that it cannot solve all the world's problems alone but where it is manifestly unwilling to relinquish leadership or power to anyone else. An important and wise study by one of Europe's top observers of the American scene." Michael Cox, co-director of IDEAS, The London School of Economics "With the advantages afforded by his perch on the other side of the Atlantic, LaIdi offers a controversial take on the evolution of US foreign policy on Obama's watch. His book provides a fresh interpretation of recent developments in US statecraft and casts light on where US diplomacy may be headed in the years ahead." Charles A. Kupchan, professor of International Relations, Georgetown University and Whitney H. Shepardson Senior Fellow, Council on Foreign Relations "Limited Achievements is deeply thoughtful, diligently researched, and delightfully readable. LaIdi has developed clear metrics by which to judge Obama's foreign policy, which at times produce surprising results. His core argument is thoroughly convincing. Any serious student of US foreign policy needs to read this book." John Peterson, professor of International Politics, University of Edinburgh
'This outstanding book manages to do something that few other works on Obama's foreign policy have been able to do so far: provide an original and balanced assessment of one of the great transitional moments in American international relations one in which the United States is finding out that it cannot solve all the world's problems alone but where it is manifestly unwilling to relinquish leadership or power to anyone else. An important and wise study by one of Europe's top observers of the American scene." - Michael Cox, co-director of IDEAS, The London School of Economics "With the advantages afforded from his perch on the other side of the Atlantic, LaIdi offers a controversial take on the evolution of U.S. foreign policy during Obama's watch. His book provides a fresh interpretation of recent developments in U.S. statecraft, and casts light on where U.S. diplomacy may be headed in the years ahead." - Charles A. Kupchan, professor of International Relations, Whitney H. Shepardson Senior Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations, Georgetown University, and author of No One's World 'Limited Achievements , is deeply thoughtful, diligently researched, and delightfully readable. LaIdi has developed clear metrics by which to judge Obama's foreign policy, which at times produce surprising results. His core argument is thoroughly convincing. Any serious student of US foreign policy needs to read this book.' - John Peterson, professor of International Politics, University of Edinburgh
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, May 2013
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Through an analysis of the general principles of Obama's foreign policy, Zaidi shows how Obama has charted a realist course in the Middle East, in Europe, in diplomacy, and in war.
Description for Bookstore
Through an analysis of the general principles of Obama's foreign policy, Zaidi shows how Obama has charted a realist course in the Middle East, in Europe, in diplomacy, and in war
Long Description
Through an analysis of the general principles of Obama's foreign policy, LaIdi shows how Obama has charted a realist course in the Middle East, in Europe, in diplomacy, and in war.
Main Description
Barack Obama is inspired by a realist vision of the global order. His ambition is to preserve America's great power status and make it acceptable to the rest of the world. He no longer wants his country to serve as the world's policeman. However, he has no intention of letting another country displace the United States. His scope of action lies between these two limits: he has no grand design, nor is he willing to take any great risks. Through an analysis of the general principles of Obama's foreign policy, Laïdi shows how Obama has charted a realist course in the Middle East, in Europe, in diplomacy, and in war.
Main Description
Barack Obama is inspired by a realist vision of the global order. His ambition is to preserve America's great power status and make it acceptable to the rest of the world. He no longer wants his country to serve as the world's policeman. However, he has no intention of letting another country displace the United States. His scope of action lies between these two limits: he has no grand design, nor is he willing to take any great risks. Through an analysis of the general principles of Obama'sforeign policy, LaIdi shows how Obama has charted a realist course in the Middle East, in Europe, in diplomacy, and in war.
Main Description
Barack Obama is inspired by a realist vision of the global order. His ambition is to preserve America's great power status and make it acceptable to the rest of the world. He no longer wants his country to serve as the world's policeman. However, he has no intention of letting another country displace the United States. His scope of action lies between these two limits: he has no grand design, nor is he willing to take any great risks. Through an analysis of the general principles of Obama's foreign policy, Zaidi shows how Obama has charted a realist course in the Middle East, in Europe, in diplomacy, and in war.
Main Description
While the United States cannot solve the world's problems alone, it is not ready to allow any of these to be solved without it, let alone against it. This is the foundation of Obama's policy and the purpose of this book is to verify its validity and effectiveness. Barack Obama is inspired by a realist vision of the global order. Bereft of any grand vision, his ambition is to preserve America's great power status and make it acceptable to the rest of the world. He no longer wants his country to serve as the world's policeman. However, he has no intention of letting another country displace the United States. His scope of action lies between these two limits. Because he is not driven by a grand design, by the same token he is not willing to take any great risks. This may explain also why his achievements are limited.
Table of Contents
List of Tablesp. ix
Introductionp. xi
Legacyp. 1
Exuberance through the Marketp. 5
Exuberance through Warp. 8
White House Tight Ropep. 15
Obama's Personal Equationp. 15
Obama and the NSC 19Clinton, Biden, and Gates: The Guardians of Continuityp. 22
The Internal Constraints of Foreign Policyp. 28
Fragments of a Pragmatic Doctrinep. 34
No More Monsters to Destroy?p. 39
An Unlikely Isolationism?p. 41
Is Obama a Realist?p. 46
Repudiating the Ideology of September 11p. 61
The Ideological Impasses of September 11p. 62
The Repudiation of the "War on Terror"p. 66
The Permanence of American Objectivesp. 69
Back from Baghdadp. 73
The Destruction of the Iraqi Statep. 75
The Strength of National Sentimentp. 79
An Electoral Ethno-Democracyp. 83
"Good Enough for Afghanistan"p. 87
The Soviet Legacyp. 88
The Legacy of September 11p. 89
The Inevitable Falling-Out Between Karzai and Washingtonp. 90
The Weakening of the State from Foreign Aidp. 92
Fight the War Differently?p. 94
Washington's Search for an Exit Strategyp. 97
American Solitudep. 100
Breaking the Pact of Silence? Obama, the Arab Spring, and the Middle Eastp. 105
A Brief Chronology of the Arab Springp. 105
1848, 1989, and 2011p. 107
The United States and the Pact of Silencep. 109
From Tunisia to Egyptp. 113
There Is No Obama Doctrinep. 115
Peace Settlement: A Loose Plan A without a Plan Bp. 122
The Inevitable Abrogation of the Pact of Silencep. 128
Europe: The Risk-Averse Ally?p. 131
European Downgrade?p. 133
The Decline in Europe's Strategic Valuep. 136
Should Russia Be Involved in European Security?p. 137
Burden Sharing: The Libyan Revelationp. 143
The End of the Suez Cyclep. 145
Conclusion: Limited Achievementsp. 151
Appendicesp. 175
Notesp. 179
Bibliographyp. 221
Indexp. 231
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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