Catalogue

COVID-19: Updates on library services and operations.

Dixie dharma : inside a Buddhist temple in the American South /
Jeff Wilson.
imprint
Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c2012.
description
viii, 281 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0807835455 (cloth : alk. paper), 9780807835456 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c2012.
isbn
0807835455 (cloth : alk. paper)
9780807835456 (cloth : alk. paper)
contents note
Introduction: encounters at a multidenominational temple in the South -- Bringing a regional perspective to American Buddhism -- The gift of light: Buddhist circuit riders and new religious developments in Richmond, Virginia -- The Buddhist confederacy: differentiation and identity in Buddhist spaces -- There's no such thing as "not my Buddhism": hybridity, boundary-crossing, and the practice of pluralistic Buddhism -- Buddhism with a Southern accent: American Buddhists in a Southern culture -- The reality of our collective karma: slave trade meditation vigil as Southern Buddhist ritual -- Conclusion: Buddhas on the backstretch.
catalogue key
8383979
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [261]-276) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 2012-06-15:
When one thinks of the American South (the Bible Belt) one may not imagine many Buddhists living there, but the Vietnamese, Laotian, and Thai populations have been growing, and the Chinese have always had an urban presence. The region now includes Buddhists by birth as well as American converts, including Wilson (religious studies, Univ. of Waterloo) himself. Here he mainly considers the Ekoji Buddhist Temple in Richmond, VA, founded in 1985, which is pluralistic; unlike most Buddhist temples in America it shares its space with several groups with distinct traditions. There is a Pure Land group, a Zen group, a Vipassana group, a Tibetan group, and a Meditative Inquiry group. Each group has its own beliefs, meeting format, ritual style, and spiritual goals. While elsewhere they have their own temples, monasteries, and retreat facilities, in Richmond, because their numbers are small, they share space and governance. Wilson shows how this makes for a kind of tolerance and syncretism rarely found in contemporary religious practice. VERDICT This will be enlightening and well worth reading by those specializing in religious studies or interested in American regional cultures, but its academic tone will be less appealing to general readers.-James F. DeRoche, Alexandria, VA (c) Copyright 2012. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Appeared in Choice on 2012-10-01:
Wilson (Univ. of Waterloo, Ontario) is guided by two motivations: to pay greater attention to regional differences in the history of American Buddhism, and to begin focusing on a region of the US that has received little attention--the South. These motivations underlie the author's thesis that region is vital in understanding American Buddhism. Through the lenses of a multidenominational Buddhist temple in Richmond, Virginia, Wilson describes how Buddhists living in the American South have had to adapt to life in a predominantly conservative evangelical culture. He also discusses how southern non-Buddhists are adjusting to southern Buddhists. This book offers an account of a number of often-ignored expressions of Buddhist faith and practice, e.g., Buddhist circuit riders and pluralist Buddhists. Wilson's highly readable study is an excellent, much-needed contribution to American religious history in general, and in particular to the study of American Buddhism, which has focused mostly on Buddhist movements in the Northeast and in California. Of particular interest is his analysis of how regional specificity expresses itself through such practices as meditation to heal the wounds of the slave trade. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Lower-level undergraduates and above; general readers. P. O. Ingram emeritus, Pacific Lutheran University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"A fascinating look at Buddhism in the Southeast. . . . [Wilson's] indefatigable curiosity, patient observation, and detailed analysis open many new avenues for further study and reflection." - Practical Matters
"An important reminder that while broad studies of religious identity are important, they must be seasoned with ethnographic views from below.... Graduate students looking for dissertation project should consult Wilson's forward facing conclusion." - Sociology of Religion
"Meticulously researched and clearly written, Dixie Dharma is an absolute must-read for scholars of Buddhism in America, and will also be of great value to the fields of American religion and religion in the South." - Religious Studies Review
"This truly excellent work brings to the fore the undeniable importance of regionalism in the study of Buddhism in America. It should not only reconfigure the field, but it should also cross over and influence the broader fields of American religion and religion in the South."--Peter N. Gregory, Smith College
"This will be enlightening and well worth reading by those specializing in religious studies or interested in American regional cultures." - Library Journal
"Through the lens of a multidenominational Buddhist temple in Richmond, Virginia, Wilson explores how Buddhists are adapting to life in the conservative evangelical Christian culture of the South, and how traditional Southerners are adjusting to these newer members on the religious landscape." - American Catholic Studies Newsletter
"Wilson presents an impressive view of a plural Buddhism finding a place in the midst of the evangelical South." - Religion in American History
"Wilson's contribution to American religious history and American Buddhist studies is admirable." - Journal of Southern Religion
"Wilson's highly readable study is an excellent, much-needed contribution to American religious history in general, and in particular to the study of American Buddhism. . . . Highly recommended. Lower-level undergraduates and above; general readers."-- - Choice
This item was reviewed in:
Library Journal, June 2012
Choice, October 2012
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Buddhism in the US is often viewed in connection with practitioners in the Northeast and on the West Coast, but in fact, it has been spreading and evolving throughout the US since the mid-19th century. This book argues that the South is crucial to understanding American Buddhism.
Main Description
Buddhism in the United States is often viewed in connection with practitioners in the Northeast and on the West Coast, but in fact, it has been spreading and evolving throughout the United States since the mid-nineteenth century. In Dixie Dharma , Jeff Wilson argues that region is crucial to understanding American Buddhism. Through the lens of a multidenominational Buddhist temple in Richmond, Virginia, Wilson explores how Buddhists are adapting to life in the conservative evangelical Christian culture of the South, and how traditional Southerners are adjusting to these newer members on the religious landscape. Introducing a host of overlooked characters, including Buddhist circuit riders, modernist Pure Land priests, and pluralistic Buddhists, Wilson shows how regional specificity manifests itself through such practices as meditation vigils to heal the wounds of the slave trade. He argues that southern Buddhists at once use bodily practices, iconography, and meditation tools to enact distinct sectarian identities even as they enjoy a creative hybridity.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. vii
Introduction Encounters at a Multidenominational Temple in the Southp. 1
Bringing a Regional Perspective to American Buddhismp. 17
The Gift of Light: Buddhist Circuit Riders and New Religious Developments in Richmond, Virginiap. 47
The Buddhist Confederacy: Differentiation and Identity in Buddhist Spacesp. 89
There's No Such Thing as "Not My Buddhism": Hybridity, Boundary-Crossing, and the Practice of Pluralistic Buddhismp. 120
Buddhism with a Southern Accent: American Buddhists in a Southern Culturep. 153
The Reality of Our Collective Karma: Slave Trade Meditation Vigil as Southern Buddhist Ritualp. 185
Conclusion Buddhas on the Backstretchp. 218
Appendix Statistical Data and Questionnairep. 233
Notesp. 237
Bibliographyp. 261
Indexp. 277
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem