Catalogue

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Replacing France [electronic resource] : the origins of American intervention in Vietnam /
Kathryn C. Statler.
imprint
Lexington : University Press of Kentucky, c2007.
description
xii, 378 p. : map ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0813124409 (hardcover : alk. paper), 9780813124407 (hardcover : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Lexington : University Press of Kentucky, c2007.
isbn
0813124409 (hardcover : alk. paper)
9780813124407 (hardcover : alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Introduction : The Franco-American alliance and Vietnam -- Part 1. Neither communism nor colonialism, 1950-1954. Decolonization and Cold War ; A death in March ; Negotiating toward Geneva -- Part 2. After Geneva, 1954-1956. The Diem experimen ; The non-elections of 1956 ; From the French to the Americans -- Part 3. War by other means, 1956-1960. Maintaining a presence ; Building a colony -- Conclusion : Replacing France.
catalogue key
8381275
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 347-368) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2008-04-01:
Making extensive use of French sources, Statler (Univ. of South Dakota) examines the role that the Franco-American alliance played in the US intervention in Vietnam in the 1950s. She convincingly argues that the inability of France and the US to agree on a common policy in Indochina and against the communist threat in general caused the US to replace France as the major Western power in Vietnam. But the US, despite its resolve to nation-build, succeeded, in her view, in simply replacing the colonialism of the French with a neocolonial policy of its own. Statler's contention that intra-alliance politics played as much of a role as anticommunism in US policy is a welcome addition to the study of the US role in Vietnam, and her account of the US use of cultural weapons is innovative. But the author occasionally weakens her case with speculation that goes too far beyond the evidence, and with a concluding attack on John Foster Dulles's "villainy" that contradicts the transnational analysis that precedes it. Nonetheless, this is a worthwhile contribution to the literature. Summing Up: Recommended. All college and university libraries. L. M. Lees Old Dominion University
Reviews
Review Quotes
""In powerfully illuminating the understudied era between the wars, [the book] is now the essential starting point for all future scholarship on this period."" -- Mark Philip Bradley, International Review of History
""In the crowded field of Vietnam scholarship, Statler offers something fresh and important--a study on the dynamics of the Franco-American relationship. In the process, she provides persuasive answers to some of the key questions about the decisions that led the United States into Vietnam."" -- Mark Atwood Lawrence, author of Assuming the Burden: Europe and the American Co
""In the crowded field of Vietnam scholarship, Statler offers something fresh and important" -- Mark Atwood Lawrence, author of Assuming the Burden: Europe and the American Co
""Kathryn Statler... has written an erudite, well-researched, and deep and penetrating analysis of the process where in the United States replaced France as the 'colonial' power in Indo China, however inadvertently.""This is a fascinating story, well told."" -- Capt. John F. O'Connell, Air Power History
�Kathryn Statler. . . has written an erudite, well-researched, and deep and penetrating analysis of the process where in the United States replaced France as the �colonial� power in Indo China, however inadvertently.��This is a fascinating story, well told.��Capt. John F. O�Connell, Air Power History
""Kathryn Statler's Replacing France is an original interpretation of why and how the United States replaced France as the dominant Western power in Vietnam during the 1950s. This book will demand the attention of all scholars of American foreign policy and Vietnam War."" -- David F. Schmitz,Whitman College, author of The Tet Offensive: Politics, War, a
One comes away from this book deeply impressed by Statler�s research and her ability to piece together a complicated narrative from many hundreds of documents.
""One comes away from this book deeply impressed by Statler's research and her ability to piece together a complicated narrative from many hundreds of documents."" -- Andrew J. Rotter, American Historical Review
�Overall, this is a well-conceived and deeply researched study that does much to illuminate the sources of tension in the Franco-American relationship over Vietnam, and the far from straightforward way that the United States supplanted (but did not replace completely) French influence in the years following defeat at Dien Bien Phu.�
""Overall, this is a well-conceived and deeply researched study that does much to illuminate the sources of tension in the Franco-American relationship over Vietnam, and the far from straightforward way that the United States supplanted (but did not replace completely) French influence in the years following defeat at Dien Bien Phu."" -- Matthew Jones, The Journal of American History
�[Statler] convincingly argues that the inability of France and the US to agree on a common policy in Indochina and against the communist threat in general caused the US to replace France as a major Western power in Vietnam."
""[Statler] convincingly argues that the inability of France and the US to agree on a common policy in Indochina and against the communist threat in general caused the US to replace France as a major Western power in Vietnam."" -- L. M. Les, Choice
Statler�s book does provide us with a fascinating, detailed and much needed account of the transition of power from France to the United States in South Vietnam while Ho Chi Minh�s Democratic Republic of Vietnam controlled the North.
""Statler's book does provide us with a fascinating, detailed and much needed account of the transition of power from France to the United States in South Vietnam while Ho Chi Minh's Democratic Republic of Vietnam controlled the North."" -- Peter Neville, Diplomacy and Statecraft
Statler�s book is well-written and thoroughly researched. Any scholar studying American foreign policy or the Vietnam War would find this work a valuable resource.
""Statler's book is well-written and thoroughly researched. Any scholar studying American foreign policy or the Vietnam War would find this work a valuable resource."" -- Kevin M. Brady, On Point
""This detailed, thoroughly researched book is a pleasure to read. The prose is so lively that the reader progresses easily through this complicated story. Professor Statler offers her judgments after carefully laying out the available evidence and citing the work of scholars with conflicting interpretations. In its depth of scholarship, careful analysis and clear prose, Replacing France is an important complement to previous scholarship on the origins of the United States commitment in Vietnam."" -- Marianna P. Sullivan, Military History
�This detailed, thoroughly researched book is a pleasure to read. The prose is so lively that the reader progresses easily through this complicated story. Professor Statler offers her judgments after carefully laying out the available evidence and citing the work of scholars with conflicting interpretations. In its depth of scholarship, careful analysis and clear prose, Replacing France is an important complement to previous scholarship on the origins of the United States commitment in Vietnam.��Marianna P. Sullivan, Military History
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, April 2008
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Long Description
Using recently released archival materials, Replacing France explains how and why the United States came to assume control as the dominant western power in Vietnam during the 1950s.
Main Description
Using recently released archival materials from the United States and Europe, Replacing France: The Origins of American Intervention in Vietnam explains how and why the United States came to assume control as the dominant western power in Vietnam during the 1950s. Acting on their conviction that American methods had a better chance of building a stable, noncommunist South Vietnamese nation, Eisenhower administration officials systematically ejected French military, economic, political, bureaucratic, and cultural institutions from Vietnam. Kathryn C. Statler examines diplomatic maneuvers in Paris, Washington, London, and Saigon to detail how Western alliance members sought to transform South Vietnam into a modern, westernized, and democratic ally but ultimately failed to counter the Communist threat. Abetted by South Vietnamese prime minister Ngo Dinh Diem, Americans in Washington, D.C., and Saigon undermined their French counterparts at every turn, resulting in the disappearance of a French presence by the time Kennedy assumed office. Although the United States ultimately replaced France in South Vietnam, efforts to build South Vietnam into a nation failed. Instead, it became a dependent client state that was unable to withstand increasing Communist aggression from the North. Replacing France is a fundamental reassessment of the origins of U.S. involvement in Vietnam that explains how Franco-American conflict led the United States to pursue a unilateral and ultimately imperialist policy in Vietnam.
Unpaid Annotation
Statler reexamines US involvement in Vietnam during the rising threat of Communism, focusing on the similarities between the efforts of France and the United States. She describes how these two countries, equally blinded by a deep belief in the inherent superiority of their own cultures, ultimately failed in building South Vietnam into a nation.
Table of Contents
Introduction : the Franco-American alliance and Vietnamp. 1
Neither communism nor colonialism, 1950-1954
Decolonization and Cold Warp. 15
A death in Marchp. 51
Negotiating toward Genevap. 85
After Geneva, 1954-1956
The Diem experimentp. 117
The non-elections of 1956p. 155
From the French to the Americansp. 183
War by other means, 1956-1960
Maintaining a presencep. 219
Building a colonyp. 249
Conclusion : replacing Francep. 277
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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