Catalogue

COVID-19: Updates on library services and operations.

Religion and the politics of ethnic identity in Bahia, Brazil [electronic resource] /
Stephen Selka.
imprint
Gainesville : University Press of Florida, c2007.
description
x, 175 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0813031710 (alk. paper), 9780813031712 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
series title
imprint
Gainesville : University Press of Florida, c2007.
isbn
0813031710 (alk. paper)
9780813031712 (alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8381272
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [157]-168) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2008-11-01:
Selka (Indiana Univ.) offers an anthropological study of how religion--Catholic, Protestant, evangelical, and African-derived Condomble--is involved in the struggle concerning racism and identity. The author conducted his research in Salvador and Cachoeir in Bahia, Brazil, well known for their rich Afro-Brazilian traditions and as a center of racial consciousness. Selka emphasizes complexity and multiplicity as he approaches traditions, longstanding ideas, and some of the previous research regarding established relationships. Although Condomble is generally taken to be closely associated with Afro-Brazilian identity, the connection between Condomble and blackness is by no means a simple one. The same may be said of the Christian response to black identity. While many Catholics and evangelical Christians stress that their identity is nothing other than Christian, there are groups of Catholic priests who practice black ways of being Christians. There are Afro-Brazilians who participate in Condomble and Christian communities. There are many similarities between the two. Thus, the relationship between religion and Afro-Brazilian identity is highly complex. Any attempt to define Afro-Brazilian identity has to deal with mesticagem (hybridity), which would weaken the formation of a strong black identity and racial politics in a society that defines itself in terms of mixture. Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate students, faculty. A. A. Sio emeritus, Colgate University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, November 2008
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Brazilians of African descent draw upon both Christian and African diasporic religions to construct their racial identities in a variety of intriguing ways. Focusing on the Reconcavo region of northeastern Brazil, Stephen Selka provides a nuanced and sophisticated ethnography that examines what it means to be black in Brazil.
Description for Bookstore
"A brave work that helps relieve the issue of race and religion in Brazil from the heavy weight of ideology it all too often carries, while advancing the discussion of Brazilian racial politics to a new level of sophistication."--John Burdick, Syracuse University "A fascinating look at the role religion plays in struggles over identity and racism in Brazil. This is a richly detailed, theoretically sophisticated, clearly written, and important exploration of the ways in which Catholicism, Candomblé, and Evangelical Protestantism figure into resistance, struggle, and the construction of Afro-Brazilian identity."--Lindsey Hale, The University of Texas, Austin Brazilians of African descent draw upon both Christian and African diasporic religions to construct their racial identities in a variety of intriguing ways. Focusing on the Reconcavo region of northeastern Brazil--known for its rich Afro-Brazilian traditions and as a center of racial consciousness in the country--Stephen Selka provides a nuanced and sophisticated ethnography that examines what it means to be black in Brazil. Selka examines how Evangelical Protestantism, Candomblé (traditional Afro-Brazilian religion), and Catholicism--especially progressive Catholicism--are deployed in discursive struggles concerning racism and identity. In the process, he provides a model of wedding abstract theory with concrete details of everyday life. Revealing the complexity and sometimes contradictory aspects of Afro-Brazilian religious practices and racial identity, Selka brings a balanced perspective to polarized discussions of Brazilian racial politics.
Description for Bookstore
“A brave work that helps relieve the issue of race and religion in Brazil from the heavy weight of ideology it all too often carries, while advancing the discussion of Brazilian racial politics to a new level of sophistication.”--John Burdick, Syracuse University “A fascinating look at the role religion plays in struggles over identity and racism in Brazil. This is a richly detailed, theoretically sophisticated, clearly written, and important exploration of the ways in which Catholicism, Candombl , and Evangelical Protestantism figure into resistance, struggle, and the construction of Afro-Brazilian identity.”--Lindsey Hale, The University of Texas, Austin Brazilians of African descent draw upon both Christian and African diasporic religions to construct their racial identities in a variety of intriguing ways. Focusing on the Reconcavo region of northeastern Brazil--known for its rich Afro-Brazilian traditions and as a center of racial consciousness in the country--Stephen Selka provides a nuanced and sophisticated ethnography that examines what it means to be black in Brazil. Selka examines how Evangelical Protestantism, Candombl (traditional Afro-Brazilian religion), and Catholicism--especially progressive Catholicism--are deployed in discursive struggles concerning racism and identity. In the process, he provides a model of wedding abstract theory with concrete details of everyday life. Revealing the complexity and sometimes contradictory aspects of Afro-Brazilian religious practices and racial identity, Selka brings a balanced perspective to polarized discussions of Brazilian racial politics.
Main Description
Brazilians of African descent draw upon both Christian and African diasporic religions to construct their racial identities in a variety of intriguing ways. Focusing on the Reconcavo region of northeastern Brazil--known for its rich Afro-Brazilian traditions and as a center of racial consciousness in the country--Stephen Selka provides a nuanced and sophisticated ethnography that examines what it means to be black in Brazil. Selka examines how Evangelical Protestantism, Candombl (traditional Afro-Brazilian religion), and Catholicism--especially progressive Catholicism--are deployed in discursive struggles concerning racism and identity. In the process, he provides a model of wedding abstract theory with concrete details of everyday life. Revealing the complexity and sometimes contradictory aspects of Afro-Brazilian religious practices and racial identity, Selka brings a balanced perspective to polarized discussions of Brazilian racial politics.
Main Description
Brazilians of African descent draw upon both Christian and African diasporic religions to construct their racial identities in a variety of intriguing ways. Focusing on the Reconcavo region of northeastern Brazil--known for its rich Afro-Brazilian traditions and as a center of racial consciousness in the country--Stephen Selka provides a nuanced and sophisticated ethnography that examines what it means to be black in Brazil. Selka examines how Evangelical Protestantism, CandomblÉ (traditional Afro-Brazilian religion), and Catholicism--especially progressive Catholicism--are deployed in discursive struggles concerning racism and identity. In the process, he provides a model of wedding abstract theory with concrete details of everyday life. Revealing the complexity and sometimes contradictory aspects of Afro-Brazilian religious practices and racial identity, Selka brings a balanced perspective to polarized discussions of Brazilian racial politics.
Table of Contents
List of Figuresp. viii
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introductionp. 1
Religion and Race in Brazilp. 9
Catholicism and Afro-Brazilian Identityp. 48
Candomble, Afro-Brazilian Culture, and Anti-Racismp. 73
Alternative Identities, Emergent Politicsp. 97
The Politics of Afro-Brazilian Identityp. 120
Notesp. 153
Referencesp. 157
Indexp. 170
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem