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Reconstructing Appalachia [electronic resource] : the Civil War's aftermath /
edited by Andrew L. Slap ; introduction by Gordon B. McKinney.
imprint
Lexington, Ky. : University Press of Kentucky, c2010.
description
ix, 379 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0813125812 (hbk. : alk. paper), 9780813125817 (hbk. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
added author
imprint
Lexington, Ky. : University Press of Kentucky, c2010.
isbn
0813125812 (hbk. : alk. paper)
9780813125817 (hbk. : alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
A new frontier : historians, Appalachian history, and the aftermath of the Civil War / Andrew L. Slap -- Reconstruction-era violence in north Georgia : the Mossy Creek Ku Klux Klan's defense of local autonomy / Keith S. H├ębert -- UnReconstructed Appalachia : the persistence of war in Appalachia / T.R.C. Hutton -- "The other war was but the beginning" : the politics of loyalty in western North Carolina, 1865-1867 / Steven E. Nash -- "Resistless uprising"? : Thomas Dixon's uncle and western North Carolinians as Klansmen and statesmen / Paul Yandle -- Reconstructing race : Parson Brownlow and the rhetoric of race in postwar east Tennessee / Kyle Osborn -- Gathering Georgians to Zion : John Hamilton Morgan's 1876 mission to Georgia / Mary Ella Engel -- "Neither war nor peace" : West Virginia's reconstruction experience / Randall S. Gooden -- A house redivided : from sectionalism to political economy in West Virginia / Ken Fones-Wolf -- "Grudges and loyalties die so slowly" : contested memories of the Civil War in Pennsylvania's Appalachia / Robert M. Sandow -- The lost cause that wasn't : east Tennessee and the myth of unionist Appalachia / Tom Lee -- "A Northern wedge thrust into the heart of the Confederacy" : explaining Civil War loyalties in the age of Appalachian discovery, 1900-1921 / John C. Inscoe -- Civil War memory in eastern Kentucky is "predominately white" : the Confederate flag in unionist Appalachia / Anne E. Marshall.
catalogue key
8381254
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
Families, communities, and the nation itself were irretrievably altered by the Civil War and the subsequent societal transformations of the nineteenth century. The repercussions of the war incited a broad range of unique problems in the mountains, including treacherous political dynamics, racial prejudices, and a struggling regional economy. Andrew L. Slap's Reconstructing Appalachia examines life in Appalachia after the ravages of the Civil War, an unexplored area that represents a void in historical literature. Addressing a gap in the chronicles of our nation, this vital anthology explores little-known aspects of history with a particular emphasis on the Reconstruction and post-Reconstruction periods. Acclaimed scholars John C. Inscoe and Ken Fones-Wolf are joined by up-and-comers like Mary Ella Engel, Anne E. Marshall, and Kyle Osborn in a unique collection of essays investigating postwar Appalachia with clarity and precision. Featuring a broad geographic focus, these compelling essays cover postwar events in Georgia, Kentucky, North Carolina, Tennessee, West Virginia, and Pennsylvania. This approach yields an intimate portrait of Appalachia as a diverse collection of communities where the values of place and family are of crucial importance. Highlighting a wide array of topics including racial reconciliation, tension between former Unionists and Confederates, the evolution of post--Civil War memory, and altered perceptions of race, gender, and economic status, Reconstructing Appalachia illuminates the depth and breadth of the far-reaching problems in Appalachia. Mountain dwellers endured the terrible effects of the war regardless of their loyalties to North or South; both armies destroyed railroads and trade routes throughout the region, mountain communities lost hundreds of able-bodied men,and farms were stripped of produce by passing regiments, causing widespread food shortages throughout Appalachia. The combined effects of these losses caused the collapse of an economic and social infrastructure that took decades to repair. Exploring the voices voices of a forgotten region, Reconstructing Appalachia unearths the history of a proud people coming to grips with the aftermath of war.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 2010-04-15:
Editor Slap (history, East Tennessee State Univ.; The Doom of Reconstruction) addresses a well-studied period of American history-the Civil War-but takes on a neglected topic: the war's effect on southern Appalachia, a region encompassing western Virginia, eastern Kentucky, western North Carolina, eastern Tennessee, northern Georgia, western Pennsylvania, and northern Alabama. The Civil War experience and its aftermath in these isolated mountainous communities is investigated with new information and expert analysis, which show that the region quickly turned out to be less than hospitable to either the Confederate or the Union side, with residents who grew increasingly resistant and then hostile to the policies of both. The contributing scholars, by highlighting a wide array of topics, show how particularly harmful the conflict was in southern Appalachia, where the inhabitants suffered from social fragmentation, profound economic breakdowns, and grudges and loyalties that only slowly died. The area was caught in the grip of continuing warfare even after the war itself had ended. VERDICT This impressive new study will pave the way for additional scholarship. Excellent, readable, and absorbing history, it gives us a better understanding of this compelling aspect of the Civil War. Highly recommended for both general readers and specialists.-Nancy Richey, Western Kentucky Univ. Lib., Bowling Green (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Appeared in Choice on 2010-12-01:
Devastated by the Civil War, Appalachia was immediately subjected to the further stresses of Reconstruction and modernization. The shock of rapid modernization on the region has been well explored, but its experience under Reconstruction has been largely ignored. This collection of 13 essays ends that neglect. Appalachians continued to fight the Civil War among themselves long after the Confederate surrender at Appomattox. T. R. C. Hutton and Steven E. Nash graphically describe how wartime hostilities continued to smolder, fueling political rivalries and violence for decades after the war. Emancipation meant that Appalachia's struggle to deal with race took new forms. Kyle Osborn, Paul Yandle, and Keith S. Hebert provide insights into how the Ku Klux Klan complicated the region's reaction to Reconstruction. Reconstruction also subjected Appalachia to the influence of outside forces. Randall S. Gooden and Ken Fones-Wolf describe how outsiders shaped and exploited the region's political and governmental landscape and economic development, while Mary Ella Engel examines the religious consequences of the Mormon Church's Southern States Mission. Many of the essays reveal how outsiders shaped the long-lasting hillbilly stereotype. An important book. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. H. T. Blethen emeritus, Western Carolina University
Reviews
Review Quotes
""Achieving the editor's worthy objective of stimulating additional work, these essays on post-Civil War Appalachia and its long reconstruction will become a necessary touchstone... the volume incidentally makes a strong case for Appalachian exceptionalism for the last four decades of the nineteenth century."--The Journal of Southern History" --
""All of [the chapters] are of high quality and well worth the read."--The Journal of American History" --
"A major contribution to the continuing re-evaluation of the mountain region's history. This volume marks an extension of that rich scholarship, providing a vital bridge between the agrarian/sectional and industrial/national eras." -- Martin Crawford, author of Ashe County's Civil War: Community and Society in the Appalachian South
""Devastated by the Civil War, Appalachia was imediately subjected to the further stresses of Reconstruction and modernization. The shock of rapid modernization on the region has been well explored, but its experience under Reconstruction has been largely ignored. This collection of thirteen essays ends that neglect...Many of the essays reveal how outsiders shaped the long-lasting hillbilly steretype. An important book. Highly recommended."--Choice Magazine" --
""I hope southern historians will seek it out as a fresh contribution."--Journal of East Tennessee History" --
""In a collection of essays, several Southern historians examine life in Appalachia after the War Between the States ravaged the region."--Bluegrass Bookshelf" --
"In a collection of essays, several Southern historians examine life in Appalachia after the War Between the States ravaged the region." -- Kentucky.com, Bluegrass Bookshelf
""In a collection of essays, several Southern historians examine life in Appalachia after the War Between the States ravaged the region."--Lexington Herald-Leader" --
""Is about how the mountaineers endured the war's consequences....this is a great book."--H-War" --
""It invites reinterpretation and helps to redefine a region characterized by a multitude of stereotypes."--Maryland Historical Magazine" --
""Many of the essays reveal how outsiders shaped the long-lasting hillbilly steretype. An important book. Highly recommended."--Choice" --
""Provide deeply researched and generally well-argued topical chapters that offer important revisionist insights into Reconstruction-era Appalachia's cultural, economic, political, and social history."--Florida Historical Quarterly" --
""Reconstructing Appalachia addresses a gap in the nation's chronicles, as it explores little-known aspects of history with a particular focus on the Reconstruction and even the post-Reconstruction periods of the late 1800s."--Bristol Herald Courier" --
""Reconstructing Appalachia addresses a gap in the nation's chronicles, as it explores little-known aspects of history with a particular focus on the Reconstruction and even the post-Reconstruction periods of the late 1800s."" -- TriCities.com
""Reconstructing Appalachia addresses a gap in the nation's chronicles, as it explores little-known aspects of history with a particular focus on the Reconstruction and even the post-Reconstruction periods of the late 1800s."--TriCities.com" -- TriCities.com
""Reconstructing Appalachia is outstanding."--North Caroline Historical Review" --
"Reconstructing Appalachia is outstanding." -- The North Caroline Historical Review
""Reconstructing Appalachia is outstanding."--The North Caroline Historical Review" -- The North Caroline Historical Review
"Reconstructing Appalachia is the story of a region coming to grips with the aftermath of a devastating homegrown war." -- kydirect.net
""Slap and twelve other historians... offer important revisionist insights into Reconstruction-era Appalachia's cultural, economic, political, and social history." -- Florida Historical Quarterly" --
""[Slap] has collected 13 essays.... examining a wide array of topics related to the tough, often halting, healing process in our region."--Goldenseal" --
""The American Civil War left a lasting mark on the lands and people of Appalachia, where there are diverse collection of communities where the values of place and family are crucial importance."--Lone Star" --
"The American Civil War left a lasting mark on the lands and people of Appalachia, where there are diverse collection of communities where the values of place and family are crucial importance." -- The Lone Star
""The collection provides a well-constructed and much needed historiographical connection between the Civil War era and the industrialization of Appalachia." --West Virginia History" --
"The end of the Civil War was only the beginning." -- Ina Hughs, Knoxnews.com
""The end of the Civil War was only the beginning."--Ina Hughs, Knoxnews.com" -- Ina Hughs, Knoxnews.com
""The end of the Civil War was only the beginning."--Knoxville News-Sentinel" --
"The mountain people and small farmers didn't own many slaves or care too much about states' rights.... But they bore a great amount of the war's destruction. It left them embittered, resentful of any government authority and suspicious of outsiders." -- Louisville Courier-Journal
""This collection of essays is a sign that the era of missed opportunities is coming to an end, and it contains a range of thought-provoking essays.... [It] has the potential to be an important influence on Reconstruction historiography."--American Historical Review" --
""This impressive new study will pave the way for additional scholarship. Excellent, readable, and absorbing history, it gives us a better understanding of this compelling aspect of the Civil War. Highly recommended for both general readers and specialists"--Library Journal" --
"This impressive new study will pave the way for additional scholarship. Excellent, readable, and absorbing history, it gives us a better understanding of this compelling aspect of the Civil War. Highly recommended for both general readers and specialists" -- The Library Journal
""This impressive new study will pave the way for additional scholarship. Excellent, readable, and absorbing history, it gives us a better understanding of this compelling aspect of the Civil War. Highly recommended for both general readers and specialists"--The Library Journal" -- The Library Journal
""This is an essential work for Appalachian Studies scholars whether historians or not."--H-Net Reviews" --
""This much needed and very useful collection highlights the Appalachian region's diverse responses to the Civil War and complicates, while it illuminates, several long-standing historical debates...Andrew L. Slap illuminates the course of Appalachian historiography, stressing the persistent debates over isolation and the origins of poverty, exposing myths and methodologies alike. He also articulates the purpose of this collection--new scholarship on the less studied period immediately after the war can create a chronological bridge, thus clarifying the debates over farm and industrial Appalachias...In sum, these essays show a diverse, often localized Appalachian postwar society, with a contested, mythologized, but still relevant past, and increasingly dominant outsiders' stereotypes and capital."" -- Civil War Book Review
""This much needed and very useful collection highlights the Appalachian region's diverse responses to the Civil War and complicates, while it illuminates, several long-standing historical debates."--Civil War Book Review" --
This item was reviewed in:
Library Journal, April 2010
Reference & Research Book News, November 2010
Choice, December 2010
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
The repercussions of the Civil War incited unique problems in Appalachia, including treacherous political dynamics, racial prejudices, and the struggling regional economy. Here, Andrew L. Slap explores life in Appalachia after the ravages of the Civil War.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. vii
Introductionp. 1
A New Frontier: Historians, Appalachian History, and the Aftermath of the Civil Warp. 23
Reconstruction-era Violence in North Georgia: The Mossy Creek Ku Klux Klan's Defense of Local Autonomyp. 49
UnReconstructed Appalachia: The Persistence of War in Appalachiap. 71
"The Other War was but the Beginning": The Politics of Loyalty in Western North Carolina, 1865-1867p. 105
"Resistless Uprising"?: Thomas Dixon's Uncle and Western North Carolinians as Klansmen and Statesmenp. 135
Reconstructing Race: Parson Brownlow and the Rhetoric of Race in Postwar East Tennesseep. 163
Gathering Georgians to Zion: John Hamilton Morgan's 1876 Mission to Georgiap. 185
"Neither War nor Peace": West Virginia's Reconstruction Experiencep. 211
A House Redivided: From Sectionalism to Political Economy in West Virginiap. 237
"Grudges and Loyalties Die so Slowly": Contested Memories of the Civil War in Pennsylvania's Appalachiap. 269
The Lost Cause that Wasn't: East Tennessee and the Myth of Unionist Appalachiap. 293
"A Northern Wedge Thrust into the Heart of the Confederacy" Explaining Civil War Loyalties in the Age of Appalachian Discovery, 1900-1921p. 323
Civil War Memory in Eastern Kentucky Is "Predominately White": The Confederate Flag in Unionist Appalachiap. 349
List of Contributorsp. 367
Indexp. 371
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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