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The rise and fall of early American magazine culture /
Jared Gardner.
imprint
Urbana : University of Illinois Press, c2012.
description
xi, 203 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0252036700 (cloth : alk. paper), 9780252036705 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Urbana : University of Illinois Press, c2012.
isbn
0252036700 (cloth : alk. paper)
9780252036705 (cloth : alk. paper)
contents note
Introduction : the literary museum and the unsettling of the early American novel -- American spectators, tatlers, and guardians : transatlantic periodical culture in the eighteenth century -- The American magazine in the early national period : publishers, printers, and editors -- The American magazine in the early national period : readers, correspondents, and contributors -- The early American magazine in the nineteenth century : Brown, Rowson, and Irving.
catalogue key
8377534
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [177]-198) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2012-12-01:
Gardner (Ohio State) demonstrates that early American periodicals constitute a coherent genre and play a more central role in the formation of an early American literary imagination than is generally recognized. Early American periodicals, he argues, are organized by conventions that contrast with those of the early American novel: they privilege the editorial over the authorial function, encourage active rather than passive reading, and celebrate the fragment and miscellany instead of fictional coherence. All in all, they articulate a kind of federalist ideology and literary imagination, one that assumes a talented editor can discover order and beauty in the careful arrangement of varied submissions. Drawing on every major early American periodical published from the Revolution onward, Gardner traces the early American periodical to the early 1800s, when the periodical culture and the literary market shifted. He offers real revelations, particularly in his examinations of how the conventions of early American periodicals inform and/or shape even the longer works of Charles Brockden Brown, Susanna Rowson, and Washington Irving. The early American novel will never seem the same. Summing Up: Essential. Lower-division undergraduates through faculty; general readers. G. D. MacDonald Virginia State University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Gardner demonstrates that early American periodicals constitute a coherent genre and play a more central role in the formation of an early American literary imagination than is generally recognized. . . . Essential."-- Choice
"Gardner demonstrates that early American periodicals constitute a coherent genre and play a more central role in the formation of an early American literary imagination than is generally recognized. . . . Essential."-- Choice "An eloquent picture of magazine journalism's place in literary history as the seminal contributor to the beginnings of the great American novel."-- American Journalism
"Jared Gardner provides an innovative account of the place of the magazine in U.S. literary history that allows for a reimagining of a large part of the conventional wisdom of the field. His well-written, original book situates magazine culture between and against the newspaper press on one hand and the novel on the other, and he usefully explains both the curious career trajectories of a number of familiar writers and the reasons why intelligent men and women continued to produce magazines without rational expectation of commercial success or viability."--John C. Nerone, coauthor of The Form of News: A History
"Smoothly written and well researched. . . . an important contribution to the University of Illinois Press's valuable History of Communication series."-- The Journal of American History "Jared Gardner provides an innovative account of the place of the magazine in U.S. literary history that allows for a reimagining of a large part of the conventional wisdom of the field. His well-written, original book situates magazine culture between and against the newspaper press on one hand and the novel on the other, and he usefully explains both the curious career trajectories of a number of familiar writers and the reasons why intelligent men and women continued to produce magazines without rational expectation of commercial success or viability."--John C. Nerone, coauthor of The Form of News: A History
"Stimulating and highly readable. . . . fizzes with ideas, offered as answers to a question glossed over by established literary histories."-- H-Net Reviews " The Rise and Fall of Early American Magazine Culture is an ambitious reimagining of magazine culture in the early national period, which largely has been viewed not only as a failure but also as less important and less rich than the so-called golden age of nineteenth-century periodicals. Under Gardner's careful attention, however, the early national period emerges as a time of extraordinary periodical experimentation and worthy, in its own right, of a study such as this."--Patricia Okker, author of Social Stories: The Magazine Novel in Nineteenth-Century America
" The Rise and Fall of Early American Magazine Culture is an ambitious reimagining of magazine culture in the early national period, which largely has been viewed not only as a failure but also as less important and less rich than the so-called golden age of nineteenth-century periodicals. Under Gardner's careful attention, however, the early national period emerges as a time of extraordinary periodical experimentation and worthy, in its own right, of a study such as this."--Patricia Okker, author of Social Stories: The Magazine Novel in Nineteenth-Century America
" The Rise and Fall of Early American Magazine Culture is an ambitious reimagining of magazine culture in the early national period, which largely has been viewed not only as a failure but also as less important and less rich than the so-called golden age of nineteenth-century periodicals. Under Gardner's careful attention, however, the early national period emerges as a time of extraordinary periodical experimentation and worthy, in its own right, of a study such as this." Patricia Okker, author of Social Stories: The Magazine Novel in Nineteenth-Century America "Jared Gardner provides an innovative account of the place of the magazine in U.S. literary history that allows for a reimagining of a large part of the conventional wisdom of the field. His well-written, original book situates magazine culture between and against the newspaper press on one hand and the novel on the other, and he usefully explains both the curious career trajectories of a number of familiar writers and the reasons why intelligent men and women continued to produce magazines without rational expectation of commercial success or viability." John C. Nerone, co-author of The Form of News: A History
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, December 2012
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Countering assumptions about early American print culture and challenging our scholarly fixation on the novel, Gardner re-imagines the early American magazine as a literary culture that operated as a model for nation-building by celebrating editorship over authorship and serving as a virtual salon.
Main Description
Countering assumptions about early American print culture and challenging our scholarly fixation on the novel, Jared Gardner re-imagines the early American magazine as a rich literary culture that operated as a model for nation-building by celebrating editorship over authorship and serving as a virtual salon in which citizens were invited to share their different perspectives. The Rise and Fall of Early American Magazine Culture re-examines early magazines and their reach to show how magazine culture was multi-vocal and presented a porous distinction between author and reader, as opposed to novel culture, which imposed a one-sided authorial voice and restricted the agency of the reader.
Main Description
Countering assumptions about early American print culture and challenging our scholarly fixation on the novel, Jared Gardner reimagines the early American magazine as a rich literary culture that operated as a model for nation-building by celebrating editorship over authorship and serving as a virtual salon in which citizens were invited to share their different perspectives. The Rise and Fall of Early American Magazine Culture reexamines early magazines and their reach to show how magazine culture was multivocal and presented a porous distinction between author and reader, as opposed to novel culture, which imposed a one-sided authorial voice and restricted the agency of the reader.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. ix
Introduction: The Literary Museum and the Unsettling of the Early American Novelp. 1
American Spectators, Tatlers, and Guardians: Transatlantic Periodical Culture in the Eighteenth Centuryp. 31
The American Magazine in the Early National Period: Publishers, Printers, and Editorsp. 69
The American Magazine in the Early National Period: Readers, Correspondents, and Contributorsp. 103
The Early American Magazine in the Nineteenth Century: Brown, Rowson, and Irvingp. 134
Conclusion: What Happened Nextp. 169
Notesp. 177
Indexp. 199
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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