Catalogue


Women writing crime fiction, 1860-1880 : fourteen American, British and Australian authors /
Kate Watson.
imprint
Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., c2012.
description
viii, 252 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0786467827 (softcover : alk. paper), 9780786467822 (softcover : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., c2012.
isbn
0786467827 (softcover : alk. paper)
9780786467822 (softcover : alk. paper)
abstract
"This study explores women's crime fiction writing in the mid to late 19th century in three national contexts: American, Australian and British. It also opens up critical histories of the genre. The bringing of women's "criminographic" fiction to critical attention will help correct a broader critical occlusion of crime fiction in the decades of 1860 to 1880"--Provided by publisher.
catalogue key
8376938
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 222-244) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, August 2012
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Library of Congress Summary
"This study explores women's crime fiction writing in the mid to late 19th century in three national contexts: American, Australian and British. It also opens up critical histories of the genre. The bringing of women's "criminographic" fiction to critical attention will help correct a broader critical occlusion of crime fiction in the decades of 1860 to 1880"--Provided by publisher.
Main Description
Arthur Conan Doyle has long been considered the greatest writer of crime fiction, and the gender bias of the genre has foregrounded William Godwin, Edgar Allan Poe, Wilkie Collins, Emile Gaboriau and Fergus Hume. But earlier and significant contributions were being made by women in Britain, the United States and Australia between 1860 and 1880, a period that was central to the development of the genre. This work focuses on women writers of this genre and these years, including Catherine Crowe, Caroline Clive, Elizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell, Mary Elizabeth Braddon, Mrs. Henry (Ellen) Wood, Harriet Prescott Spofford, Louisa May Alcott, Metta Victoria Fuller Victor, Anna Katharine Green, Celeste de Chabrillan, Oline Keese (Caroline Woolmer Leakey), Eliza Winstanley, Ellen Davitt, and Mary Helena Fortune--innovators who set a high standard for women writers to follow.
Main Description
This study explores women's crime fiction writing in the mid to late 19th century in three national contexts: American, Australian and British. It also opens up critical histories of the genre. The bringing of women's criminographic fiction to critical attention will help correct a broader critical occlusion of crime fiction in the decades of 1860 to 1880, as generic forms and boundaries (including the rise of sensation fiction) shifted and altered.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. viii
Prefacep. 1
Introduction: Transformation, Transmission and Transportationp. 3
Britain
Introductionp. 15
Catherine Crowe (1790-1872)p. 20
Caroline Clive (1810-1873)p. 22
Elizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell (1801-1865)p. 38
Mary Elizabeth Braddon (1835-1915)p. 43
Mrs. Henry (Ellen) Wood (1814-1887)p. 59
Colonial Connectionsp. 64
United States
Introductionp. 68
Harriet Prescott Spofford (1835-1921)p. 79
Louisa May Alcott (1832-1888)p. 85
Metta Victoria Fuller Victor (1831-1885)p. 99
Anna Katharine Green (1846-1935)p. 118
Australia
Introductionp. 132
Céleste de Chabrillan (1824-1909)p. 151
Caroline Woolmer Leakey (Oliné Keese) (1827-1881)p. 153
Eliza Winstanley (1818-1882)p. 157
Ellen Davitt (c. 1812-1879)p. 158
Mary Helena Fortune (c. 1833-c. 1909/10)p. 172
Chapter Notesp. 191
Bibliographyp. 222
Indexp. 245
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem