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Zimbabwe's guerrilla war [electronic resource] : peasant voices /
Norma J. Kriger.
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1992.
description
x, 303 p. : maps ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0521392543
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1992.
isbn
0521392543
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8375510
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 277-295) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1992-09:
After explaining at length why structuralist theories are less applicable than voluntarist ones to peasant mobilization during Zimbabwe's war for independence, the author adopts both in a unique and fascinating micro case study of that country's Mutoko region near Mozambique. Drawing on interview data acquired in 1981-82 and on extensive literature, Kriger argues that peasants participated in the war of liberation not because they were united by either cultural nationalism or opposition to white racism, or because the guerrillas offered attractive benefits, but because distinctive groups among them had their own particular agendas. Emphasizing the voluntarist position that "human agency determines outcomes" and noting that coercive measures used by guerrilla organizations were unpopular, Kriger analyzes modes of participation rising out of internal conflicts among the peasants. Youths challenged the traditional authority of their elders, strangers (non-clan members) claimed lineage status in villages, women hoped for relief from subservience vis-'a-vis their male relatives, and the poor eagerly sought an improved quality of life. This excellent and unique analysis of internal sources of peasant liberationist support tends to be overcritical of the external orientation of other analysts e.g., Terence O. Ranger's Peasant Consciousness and Guerrilla War in Zimbabwe (CH, Mar'86) and David Lan's Guns and Rain (1985). The bibliography is excellent; the description of methodology is a model. Graduate collections. M. E. Doro; Connecticut College
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, September 1992
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Summaries
Description for Bookstore
In this study of political mobilization and organization in Zimbabwe's rural-based war of independence, Norma Kriger is interested in the extent to which ZANU guerrillas were able to mobilize peasant support, the reasons why peasants participated, and in the links between the post-war outcomes for peasants and the mobilization process.
Main Description
Studies of revolution generally regard peasant popular support as a prerequisite for success. In this study of political mobilization and organization in Zimbabwe's recent rural-based war of independence, Norma Kriger is interested in the extent to which ZANU guerrillas were able to mobilize peasant support, the reasons why peasants participated, and in the links between the post-war outcomes for peasants and the mobilization process. Hers is an unusual study of revolution in that she interviews peasants and other participants about their experiences, and she is able to produce fresh insights into village politics during a revolution. In particular, Zimbabwean peasant accounts direct our attention to the ZANU guerrillas' ultimate political victory despite the lack of peasant popular support, and to the importance that peasants attached to gender, generational and other struggles with one another. Her findings raise questions about theories of revolution.
Table of Contents
Peasant revolutions: theories and methods
Inequalities and peasant grievances
Strategies, goals and appeals: continuity and change
Guerrilla - civilian relations: the issue of popular support
Struggles in the struggle
Legacies of the war for peasants
Conclusion.
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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