Catalogue


Writing to the king [electronic resource] : nation, kingship, and literature in England, 1250-1350 /
David Matthews.
imprint
Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2010.
description
xv, 221 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0521111374 (hardback), 9780521111379 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2010.
isbn
0521111374 (hardback)
9780521111379 (hardback)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Introduction -- Defending Anglia -- Attacking Scotland : Edward I and the 1290s -- Regime change -- The destruction of England : crisis and complaint c.1300-41 -- Love letters to Edward III -- Envoy -- Appendix. The tail-rhyme poems of Langtoft's chronicle.
catalogue key
8375474
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 205-216) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
'… this book is to be welcomed for its ambitious contribution to the history of political writing in the century before the great Ricardian poets.' The Review of English Studies
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Description for Bookstore
In this 2010 book David Matthews explores political critique - in Anglo-Latin, Anglo-Norman, and Middle English - in the century before Chaucer, highlighting its frequent direction to the king. He shows that the monarch was clearly not intended to be the direct recipient; instead, the rhetoric was used to make political comment more effective.
Main Description
In the century before Chaucer a new language of political critique emerged. In political verse of the period, composed in Anglo-Latin, Anglo-Norman, and Middle English, poets write as if addressing the king himself, drawing on their sense of the rights granted by Magna Carta. These apparent appeals to the sovereign increase with the development of parliament in the late thirteenth century and the emergence of the common petition, and become prominent, in an increasingly sophisticated literature, during the political crises of the early fourteenth century. However, very little of this writing was truly directed to the king. As David Matthews shows, the form of address was a rhetorical stance revealing much about the position from which writers were composing, the audiences they wished to reach, and their construction of political and national subjects.
Description for Bookstore
David Matthews explores political critique - in Anglo-Latin, Anglo-Norman, and Middle English - in the century before Chaucer, highlighting its frequent direction to the king. He shows that the monarch was clearly not intended to be the direct recipient; instead, the rhetoric was used to make political comment more effective.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. ix
Abbreviationsp. xiv
Introductionp. 1
Defending Angliap. 29
Attacking Scotland: Edward I and the 1290sp. 52
Regime changep. 81
The destruction of England: crisis and complaint c.1300-41p. 108
Love letters to Edward IIIp. 135
Envoyp. 156
Appendix: The tail-rhyme poems of Langtoft's chroniclep. 161
Notesp. 167
Bibliographyp. 205
Indexp. 217
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem