Catalogue

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Women and mass consumer society in postwar France [electronic resource] /
Rebecca J. Pulju.
imprint
Cambridge [England] ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2011.
description
xiv, 260 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
9781107001350
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Cambridge [England] ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2011.
isbn
9781107001350
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
abstract
"Women and Mass Consumer Society in Postwar France examines the emergence of a citizen consumer role for women during postwar modernization and reconstruction in France, integrating the history of economic modernization with that of women and the family. This role both celebrated the power of the woman consumer and created a gendered form of citizenship that did not disrupt the sexual hierarchy of home, polity, and marketplace. Redefining needs and renegotiating concepts of taste, value, and thrift, women and their families drove mass consumer society through their demands and purchases at the same time that their very need to consume came to define them"--
catalogue key
8375368
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 229-254) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Like all the best works of cultural history, Women and Mass Consumer Society in Postwar France has implications for economic, political, and social history. It will be of interest to anyone who is interested in postwar France and, more generally, for anyone interested in consumerism and the European economy in the aftermath of the Second World War." - Richard Vinen, King's College London
"This book transforms our understanding of France's economic recovery following World War II. Pulju persuasively argues that women and domestic consumption were key to the development of mass consumer society - a totally different orientation for economic growth that both the government of the Fourth Republic and women themselves espoused." -Whitney Walton, Purdue University
"This impressive study fills an important gap in the history of post-World War II economic and social recovery by expertly analyzing the contribution of women's consumption and consumer advocacy to the 'trentes glorieuses' of French economic growth between 1945 and 1975. In this fascinating story, Pulju connects data on the expansion of credit and the production and purchase of household appliances to gender and class differences. She has brilliantly blended the analysis of quantitative data with the views of economists and planners, sociologists' surveys, popular novels, and articles from women's magazines, among other sources." - Laura Levine Frader, Northeastern University
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This title examines the emergence of a citizen consumer role for women during postwar modernization and reconstruction in France.
Description for Bookstore
Examines the emergence of a citizen consumer role for women during postwar modernization and reconstruction in France, integrating the history of economic modernization with that of women and the family.
Description for Bookstore
Women and Mass Consumer Society in Postwar France examines the emergence of a citizen consumer role for women during postwar modernization and reconstruction in France, integrating the history of economic modernization with that of women and the family.
Main Description
Women and Mass Consumer Society in Postwar France examines the emergence of a citizen consumer role for women during postwar modernization and reconstruction in France, integrating the history of economic modernization with that of women and the family. This role both celebrated the power of the woman consumer and created a gendered form of citizenship that did not disrupt the sexual hierarchy of home, polity, and marketplace. Redefining needs and renegotiating concepts of taste, value, and thrift, women and their families drove mass consumer society through their demands and purchases at the same time that their very need to consume came to define them.
Table of Contents
List of Figures and Tablesp. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Abbreviationsp. xiii
Introductionp. 1
The Consensus for Modernization: State Planningp. 3
The Role of the Citizen Consumerp. 9
Women's Citizenship, ôNormalcy,ö and the Baby Boomp. 16
Organization of the Bookp. 19
Consumers for the Nation: Women, Politics, and Citizenshipp. 27
Creating a Voice for the Consumerp. 29
Defining Women's Citizenshipp. 34
The Politics of Everyday Lifep. 39
The Productivity Drive in the Home and Gaining Comfort on Creditp. 59
Productivity in the Homep. 62
The Consumer Credit Debatep. 73
Educating Citizen Consumers and Advocating the ôModern Form of Savingöp. 81
The Cost of Credit and the Expansion of the Marketp. 88
For Better and For Worse: Marriage and Family in the Consumer Societyp. 95
Choosing Home and Familyp. 97
Defining New Needs and Driving Economic Changep. 110
The Desire for Durables and Structural Change in Rural Francep. 121
Spending Money on the Homep. 130
Liberation through Domestic Consumption?p. 135
ôCan a Man with a Refrigerator Make a Revolution?ö Redefining Class in the Postwar Yearsp. 143
Standardized Living in the Classless Societyp. 144
The New Middle Classp. 149
Working Women: ôThis Machine, She's a Socialistöp. 161
The Democratization of Modernityp. 172
The Salon des arts ménagers: Learning to Consume in Postwar Francep. 180
The Evolution of the Salon des arts ménagersp. 181
Creating Citizen Consumers at the Salon des arts ménagersp. 188
The Fairy Homemaker: The Perfect Consumerp. 195
The Housewife Speaksp. 202
Epiloguep. 210
Failed Promises of Equalityp. 212
May 1968 and the Rejection of Liberation through Consumptionp. 215
End of the Market Community and the Role of Consumer for the Nationp. 222
Bibliographyp. 229
Indexp. 255
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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