Catalogue


War, state, and society in Württemberg, 1677-1793 [electronic resource] /
Peter H. Wilson.
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1995.
description
xvii, 294 p. : ill., map ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0521473020 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1995.
isbn
0521473020 (hardback)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8375165
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 260-283) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1996-02:
Wilson's work offers a reassessment of the goals of the lesser German princes under the old regime. Focusing on the state of W"urttemberg, Wilson argues against the "cultural competition" thesis of the late James Allen Vann. In Vann's view, the rulers of the small states compensated for their hopeless lack of military and political power by pursuing cultural prestige. Wilson adduces much evidence that these rulers in fact had grand political ambitions, but were constantly frustrated by the traditional powers of the Estates and structures of the Reich. Even the notorious "soldier trade" must be understood in this light: the minor princes sold troops not simply to the highest bidder, but in hopes of political advantage in their relations with the larger states. In chapters on the W"urttemberg rulers Friedrich Carl (1677-93), Eberhard Ludwig (1693-1733), Carl Alexander (1733-37), the regency (1737-44), and Carl Eugen (1744-93), Wilson strives to show that the "primacy of foreign policy" affected state-building even among relatively weak princes. This is sophisticated, if old-fashioned, political history, directed at advanced students of early-modern state structures, finances, and relations. Full scholarly apparatus. Graduate level and above. R. B. Barnes; Davidson College
Reviews
Review Quotes
"...a challenging and impressive study....Peter Wilson has provided much new material in this study. We can learn much as a result of his extensive research and creative thought." Charles J. Herber, The Sixteenth Century Journal
‘An important study that goes well beyond what a mere glance at the title might suggest, it is one of the most significant additions to Cambridge's 'Studies in Early Modern History' series.’The International History Review
' ... an important study which not only adds real substance to the slowly growing body of English-language works on the lesser states of early-modern Germany (the 'third Germany') but also demonstrates that even they could pursue complex foreign policies aimed at something more ambitious than sheer survival'. Central European History
‘ … a useful and important book … this book must be warmly welcomed as one of a growing list of serious works in English which study the Holy Roman Empire on its own terms’.Parliaments, Estates and Representation
‘ … an important study which not only adds real substance to the slowly growing body of English-language works on the lesser states of early-modern Germany (the 'third Germany') but also demonstrates that even they could pursue complex foreign policies aimed at something more ambitious than sheer survival’.Central European History
' ... a useful and important book ... this book must be warmly welcomed as one of a growing list of serious works in English which study the Holy Roman Empire on its own terms'. Parliaments, Estates and Representation
' ... a useful and important book ... this book must be warmly welcomed as one of a growing list of serious works in English which study the Holy Roman Empire on its own terms'.Parliaments, Estates and Representation
"...a well researched and crisply written case study..." David Martin Luebke, The Historian
"Peter wilson has written an important study which not only adds real substance to the slowly growing body of English-language works on the lesser states of early modern Germany...but also demonstrates that even they could pursue complex foreign policies aimed at something more ambitious than sheer survival." Central European History
"...well researched and crisply written" The Historian
‘ … an important contribution to a new appreciation of the military connection to politics and society in early modern Germany’.Journal of Modern History
'An important study that goes well beyond what a mere glance at the title might suggest, it is one of the most significant additions to Cambridge's 'Studies in Early Modern History' series.' The International History Review
' ... an important contribution to a new appreciation of the military connection to politics and society in early modern Germany'. Journal of Modern History
'An important study that goes well beyond what a mere glance at the title might suggest, it is one of the most significant additions to Cambridge's 'Studies in Early Modern History' series.'The International History Review
' ... an important contribution to a new appreciation of the military connection to politics and society in early modern Germany'.Journal of Modern History
' ... an important study which not only adds real substance to the slowly growing body of English-language works on the lesser states of early-modern Germany (the 'third Germany') but also demonstrates that even they could pursue complex foreign policies aimed at something more ambitious than sheer survival'.Central European History
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, February 1996
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Summaries
Main Description
This book provides a radical new interpretation of the aims of the lesser German princes during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries through the example of the duchy of Württemberg. Arguing that the princes' political ambitions were fundamental in shaping the internal development of their territories, the author sheds new light on the political importance of the notorious German 'soldier trade' and its role in international diplomacy. The wider social and political impact of these policies is also investigated in a comparative framework, while traditional interpretations of the dramatic struggle between duke and estates are challenged in a reassessment of the role of early modern representative institutions in German state development. The relationship of these internal political struggles to the different elements of the Holy Roman Empire is revealed, opening up new perspectives on the role of the German states within the imperial structure and revealing the empire as a flawed but functioning political system.
Main Description
This book examines the role of war and the development of the smaller German territories in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries through the example of the duchy of WÜrttemberg. It reappraises traditional interpretations of German history that emphasize the role of Prussia and play down the significance of the smaller states. This is also the first comprehensive investigation of the relationship between developments within such territories and the structure of the Holy Roman Empire of which they formed a part. It reveals the Empire as a flawed but functioning political system and sheds new light on the reasons for its collapse in 1806.
Description for Library
This book examines the role of war and the development of the smaller German territories in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries through the example of the duchy of Württemberg. It reappraises traditional interpretations of German history which emphasise the role of Prussia and play down the significance of the smaller states. This is also the first comprehensive investigation of the relationship between developments within such territories and the structure of the Holy Roman Empire of which they formed a part. It reveals the empire as a flawed but functioning political system and sheds new light on the reasons for its collapse in 1806.
Description for Bookstore
This book examines the role of war and the development of the smaller German territories in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries through the example of the duchy of Württemberg. It is also the first comprehensive investigation of the relationship between developments within such territories and the structure of the Holy Roman Empire.
Table of Contents
List of tables
Preface
Note on form
Abbreviations
Introduction
Princely aims and policy making
Strategies and resources
The German soldier trade
Regent Friedrich Carl 1677-93
Eberhard Ludwig 1693-1733
Carl Alexander 1733-37
The Regency 1737-44
Carl Eugen 1744-93
Conclusion
Bibliography
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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