Catalogue


Virginia Woolf and the migrations of language [electronic resource] /
Emily Dalgarno.
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2012.
description
xi, 215 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
9781107010185 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2012.
isbn
9781107010185 (hardback)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Machine generated contents note: Introduction; 1. Translation and ethnography in 'On Not Knowing Greek'; 2. Antigone and the public language; 3. Tolstoy, Dostoyevsky, and the Russian soul; 4. Proust and the fictions of the unconscious; 5. Translation and iterability; 6. Assia Djebar and the poetics of lamentation; Conclusion; Bibliography; Index.
abstract
"The need to change the structure of the English sentence in order better to meet the requirements of women writers is a constant theme in the work of Virginia Woolf. She wrote during a period when the goals of translation were undergoing fundamental changes that enlarged and facilitated that project. The British translator who was compelled to observe the ethnocentric standards of Greek translation in the university evolved within a few decades into a figure whose aim, in response to the demands of colonial readers, was to mediate between cultures. It is the argument of this book that although Woolf read translations to acquaint herself with the diverse cultures of the world, as a writer she quickly learned to use translation as a means to resist the tendency of the dominant language to control meaning, the first step to remodeling semantics and syntax"--
"Virginia Woolf's rich and imaginative use of language was partly a result of her keen interest in foreign literatures and languages - mainly Greek and French, but also Russian, German and Italian. As a translator she naturally addressed herself both to contemporary standards of translation within the university, but also to readers like herself. In Three Guineas she ranged herself among German scholars who used Antigone to critique European politics of the 1930s. Orlando outwits the censors with a strategy that focuses on Proust's untranslatable word. The Waves and The Years show her looking ahead to the problems of postcolonial society, where translation crosses borders. In this first in-depth study of Woolf and European languages and literatures, Emily Dalgarno opens up a rewarding new way of reading her prose"--
catalogue key
8375063
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 196-211) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2012-10-01:
This rich study centers on Virginia Woolf's engagement--as reader, writer, publisher, and translator--with texts in foreign languages. Woolf, writes Dalgarno (emer., Boston Univ.), used translation to resist the authority of dominant, patriarchal language; as such, translation is central to Woolf's idea that social transformation begins with linguistic transformation. Translation thus refers to a cultural process rather than a discrete product; it works as much within as between languages. Each chapter of this book focuses on a different set of texts to show how Woolf's personal experience with foreign language texts affected her own writing. In Three Guineas, Woolf draws on her own vexed relation to classical languages, and the patriarchal system of education that valued them, to conceive a feminine subject that refuses to mimic patriarchal language. In The Years and Mrs. Dalloway, Woolf uses ideas from Tolstoy and Dostoyevsky to distance herself from literary realism and create an English audience for Russian literature. In To the Lighthouse and Orlando, Woolf develops new conceptions of time and gender based on Proust's translation of feeling into thought. Dalgarno's book is a model of how to combine history, theory, cultural studies, and close reading. Summing Up: Essential. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. D. Stuber Hendrix College
Reviews
Review Quotes
"By forging new connections between Woolf studies and translation studies, Dalgarno's project contributes richly to both." --Woolf Studies Annual
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, October 2012
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Description for Bookstore
Dalgarno offers an extended discussion of the influence of the foreign writers whom Woolf considered most important to her work - Sophocles, Tolstoy, Dostoyevsky and Proust, from the perspective of translation theory.
Description for Bookstore
Dalgarno offers the first extended discussion of the influence of the foreign writers whom Woolf considered most important to her work - Sophocles, Tolstoy, Dostoyevsky and Proust, from the perspective of translation theory.
Description for Bookstore
Dalgarno offers the first extended discussion of the influence of the foreign writers whom Woolf considered most important to her work Sophocles, Tolstoy, Dostoyevsky and Proust, from the perspective of translation theory.
Library of Congress Summary
"Virginia Woolf's rich and imaginative use of language was partly a result of her keen interest in foreign literatures and languages - mainly Greek and French, but also Russian, German and Italian. As a translator she naturally addressed herself both to contemporary standards of translation within the university, but also to readers like herself. In Three Guineas she ranged herself among German scholars who used Antigone to critique European politics of the 1930s. Orlando outwits the censors with a strategy that focuses on Proust's untranslatable word. The Waves and The Years show her looking ahead to the problems of postcolonial society, where translation crosses borders. In this first in-depth study of Woolf and European languages and literatures, Emily Dalgarno opens up a rewarding new way of reading her prose"--
Main Description
Virginia Woolf's rich and imaginative use of language was partly a result of her keen interest in foreign literatures and languages mainly Greek and French, but also Russian, German and Italian. As a translator she naturally addressed herself both to contemporary standards of translation within the university, but also to readers like herself. In Three Guineas she ranged herself among German scholars who used Antigone to critique European politics of the 1930s. Orlando outwits the censors with a strategy that focuses on Proust's untranslatable word. The Waves and The Years show her looking ahead to the problems of postcolonial society, where translation crosses borders. In this first in-depth study of Woolf and European languages and literatures, Emily Dalgarno opens up a rewarding new way of reading her prose.
Main Description
In Virginia Woolf and the Visible World, Emily Dalgarno examines WoolfÆs engagement with notions of the subject and codes of the visible. Dalgarno examines how Woolf's writing engages with visible and non-visible realms of experience, and draws on ideas from the diverse fields of psychoanalytic theory, classical Greek tragedy, astronomy, photography, and photojournalism. The solar eclipse of 1927 marks a dividing line in Woolf's career, after which she portrayed the visible world in terms of light, and shifted her interest from painting to photography. Dalgarno offers textual analyses of Woolf's individual works, including To the Lighthouse, The Waves, and Three Guineas, arguing for the importance of her ongoing interest in Greek translation. In later chapters, she explores the theory of the subject that emerges from Woolf's representation of the visible in her autobiography. Book jacket.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. viii
List of abbreviationsp. x
The migrations of language: introductionp. 1
Translation and ethnography in "On Not Knowing Greek"p. 18
Antigone and the public languagep. 38
Tolstoy, Dostoyevsky, and the Russian soulp. 69
Proust and the fictions of the unconsciousp. 97
Translation and iterabilityp. 133
Assia Djebar and the poetics of lamentationp. 156
Conclusion
Bibliography of works citedp. 196
Indexp. 212
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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