Catalogue


The Virgin Mary in late medieval and early modern English literature and popular culture [electronic resource] /
Gary Waller.
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2011.
description
xii, 237 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0521762960, 9780521762960
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2011.
isbn
0521762960
9780521762960
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
1538 and after : the Virgin Mary in the century of iconoclasm -- The Virgin Mary in late medieval culture to 1538. The sexualization of the Virgin in the late Middle Ages ; The Virgin's body in late medieval poetry, romance, and drama ; Walsingham or Falsingham, Woolpit or Foulpit : Marian shrines and pilgrimage before 1538 -- Fades, traces : transformations of the Virgin in early modern England. Fades : Elizabethan ruins, tunes, ballads, poems ; Traces : English Petrarchism and the veneration of the Virgin ; Traces : Shakespeare and the Virgin : All's well that ends well, Pericles, and The winter's tale ; Multiple Madonnas : traces and transformations in the seventeenth century.
catalogue key
8375062
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 210-231) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2011-11-01:
With this study, Waller (Purchase College, SUNY) makes a useful contribution to discussion about early-modern portrayals of the Virgin Mary, a subject of recent literary interest as evidenced by, for example, Reuben Espinosa's Masculinity and Marion Efficacy in Shakespeare's England (2011) and Marian Moments in Early Modern British Drama, ed. by Regina Buccola and Lisa Hopkins (CH, Dec'07, 45-1904). Waller's opening three chapters summarize the popularity of the cult of the Virgin in late medieval England; the final four chapters explore the remnants of this devotional practice in the work of Spenser, Shakespeare, Raleigh, Donne, and others after the Church was established as Protestant. Waller's close attention to primary texts makes the volume of interest to historians as well as those studying literature. However, his chapters on sexualized portrayals of the Virgin and their reception by late medieval worshippers relies on psychoanalytic approaches (notably that of Julia Kristeva) that are more speculative and "presentist" than he allows, especially given the paucity of religious testimony by women of this period. These approaches are more fruitful when he examines Shakespeare's late romances; his chapter on All's Well That Ends Well, Pericles, and The Winter's Tale helpfully addresses Mary's persistent theatrical and literary presence. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. C. Baker Armstrong Atlantic State University
Reviews
Review Quotes
Review of the hardback: 'There is much food for thought about the cultural presence of the Virgin, and about the emotions and desires involved in three crucial phases of [her] history: the glories and extravagances of late medieval veneration, the violence of Reformation destruction, and her persistence in vestigial or transmuted forms in the decades that followed.' Times Literary Supplement
"Waller employs complex psychoanalytic concepts that are both thought-provoking and clearly explained." Holly Crawford Pickett, Washington and Lee University
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, November 2011
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Summaries
Description for Bookstore
Combining historical analysis and contemporary theory, including issues raised by psychoanalysis and feminist theology, Gary Waller examines the literature, theology and popular culture associated with Mary in the transition between late medieval and early modern England.
Description for Bookstore
Combining historical analysis and contemporary theory, including issues raised by psychoanalysis and feminist theology, this 2011 book examines the literature, theology and popular culture associated with Mary in the transition between late medieval and early modern England.
Main Description
The Virgin Mary was one of the most powerful images of the Middle Ages, central to people's experience of Christianity. During the Reformation, however, many images of the Virgin were destroyed, as Protestantism rejected the way the medieval Church over-valued and sexualized Mary. Although increasingly marginalized in Protestant thought and practice, her traces and surprising transformations continued to haunt early modern England. Combining historical analysis and contemporary theory, including issues raised by psychoanalysis and feminist theology, Gary Waller examines the literature, theology and popular culture associated with Mary in the transition between late medieval and early modern England. He contrasts a variety of pre-Reformation texts and events, including popular mariology, poetry, tales, drama, pilgrimage, and the emerging 'New Learning', with later sixteenth-century ruins, songs, ballads, Petrarchan poetry, the works of Shakespeare, and other texts where the Virgin's presence or influence, sometimes surprisingly, can be found.
Main Description
This book was first published in 2011. The Virgin Mary was one of the most powerful images of the Middle Ages, central to people's experience of Christianity. During the Reformation, however, many images of the Virgin were destroyed, as Protestantism rejected the way the medieval Church over-valued and sexualized Mary. Although increasingly marginalized in Protestant thought and practice, her traces and surprising transformations continued to haunt early modern England. Combining historical analysis and contemporary theory, including issues raised by psychoanalysis and feminist theology, Gary Waller examines the literature, theology and popular culture associated with Mary in the transition between late medieval and early modern England. He contrasts a variety of pre-Reformation texts and events, including popular mariology, poetry, tales, drama, pilgrimage and the emerging 'New Learning', with later sixteenth-century ruins, songs, ballads, Petrarchan poetry, the works of Shakespeare and other texts where the Virgin's presence or influence, sometimes surprisingly, can be found.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. vii
1538 and after: the Virgin Mary in the century of iconoclasmp. 1
The Virgin Mary in Late Medieval Culture to 1538p. 29
The sexualization of the Virgin in the late Middle Agesp. 31
The Virgin's body in late medieval poetry, romance, and dramap. 55
Walsingham or Falsingham, Woolpit or Foulpit? Marian shrines and pilgrimage before 1538p. 80
Fades, Traces: Transformations of the Virgin in Early Modern Englandp. 107
Fades: Elizabethan ruins, tunes, ballads, poemsp. 109
Traces: English Petrarchism and the veneration of the Virginp. 136
Traces: Shakespeare and the Virgin - All's Well That Ends Well, Pericles, and The Winter's Talep. 157
Multiple Madonnas: traces and transformations in the seventeenth centuryp. 181
Works citedp. 210
Indexp. 232
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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