Catalogue


Urban protest in Mexico and Brazil [electronic resource] /
Kathleen Bruhn.
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2008.
description
xii, 212 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0521881293 (hbk.), 9780521881296 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2008.
isbn
0521881293 (hbk.)
9780521881296 (hbk.)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Riding the tiger : popular organizations, political parties and urban protest -- Setting the stage : research design, case selection, and methods -- The limits of loyalty -- A union born out of struggles : the Union of Municipal Public Servants of São Paulo -- Partisan loyalty and corporatist control : the Unified Union of Workers of the Government of the Federal District -- Clients or citizens? : neighborhood associations in Mexico City -- Favelas and cortiços : neighborhood organizing in São Paulo -- The dynamics of protest.
catalogue key
8374902
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 182-208) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2009-01-01:
At times, urban protest seems to be endemic in Latin America. People take to the streets to protest myriad real and imagined wrongs. In the past, such protest has not been subject to any rigorous investigation. Bruhn (Univ. of California, Santa Barbara) presents a cogent examination of urban protest in Mexico and Brazil, analyzing both internal dynamics of the protest movements and external elements that either facilitate or diminish protest. This is a political science book: hypotheses are presented and tested against real-world results in order to determine the predictive power of the hypotheses. In the process hypotheses are either partially or wholly confirmed or are discarded. For instance, a past history of protests is hypothesized to increase protest, which it does, for both unions and urban popular movements. Bruhn's summary of results at the end of the book presents all the results of her analysis. One caveat: Bruhn relies almost exclusively on newspaper reports. In Latin America, newspapers are generally highly politicized and may or may not report the size and composition of the protest, or may not report it at all. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduate through professional collections. E. A. Duff emeritus, Randolph-Macon Woman's College
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Kathleen Bruhn is a first rate scholar and the work presented in this volume is excellent and very innovative. There are some fascinating stories to be told about this material, and Bruhn's exhaustive fieldwork concentrates on areas which deserve scholarly attention. Her book is based on a fantastic data set which she uses with statistical sophistication without sacrificing the user-friendliness of the text."
"Kathleen Bruhn is a first rate scholar and the work presented in this volume is excellent and very innovative. There are some fascinating stories to be told about this material, and Bruhn's exhaustive fieldwork concentrates on areas which deserve scholarly attention. Her book is based on a fantastic data set which she uses with statistical sophistication without sacrificing the user-friendliness of the text." Miguel Centeno, Princeton University
"Kathleen Bruhn, whose earlier work on the Mexican left remains the definitive analysis of the Democratic Revolutionary Party, adds to her initial scholarly reputation with a fascinating, detailed, original exploration of protest movements in Mexico City and Sao Paulo, based on a unique, author-generated, extensive data-base from newspaper archives. Bruhn masterfully combines a rigorous comparative framework and empirical analysis with qualitative insights and assessments drawn from years of field research, noting the importance of such variables as organizational culture, resources, political context, and party alliances in explaining differences in protest behavior. Urban Protest in Mexico and Brazil establishes a notable benchmark for understanding the nature and impact of social movements in the region." Roderick Camp, Claremont McKenna College
"Most movement scholarship is movement 'centric' in its ignorance of other parties to contention, and biased toward the study of reform movements in Western democracies. That is what makes Bruhn's book such a welcome change. Not only does her comparative study of movements in Brazil and Mexico shed light on the dynamics of contention in an important and understudied regime context, but in focusing her analysis on the dynamic relationships between states, parties and movements, the author offers a model for the way movements ought to be studied. This book deserves to find a broad audience in sociology and political science." Doug McAdam, Stanford University
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, January 2009
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Summaries
Description for Bookstore
Why do social organizations decide to protest instead of working through institutional channels? This book analyzes why organizations decide to protest. It also outlines the process by which protest became a key part of organizational maintenance, producing constant incentives to protest that do not reflect changing external conditions.
Description for Bookstore
Why do social organizations decide to protest instead of working through institutional channels? This book analyzes why organizations decide to protest. It also outlines the process by which protest became a key part of organizational maintenance, producing constant incentives to protest that does not reflect changing external conditions.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Why do social organisations decide to protest instead of working through institutional channels? This book draws hypotheses from three standard models of contentious political action - POS, resource mobilisation, and identity - and subjects them to a series of qualitative and quantitative tests.
Table of Contents
List of Tables
List of Figures
List of Abbreviations
Riding the Tiger: Popular Organizations, Political Parties, and Urban Protestp. 1
Setting the Stage: Research Design, Case Selection, and Methodsp. 20
The Limits of Loyaltyp. 40
A Union Born Out of Struggles: The Union of Municipal Public Servants of Sao Paulop. 62
Partisan Loyalty and Corporatist Control: The Unified Union of Workers of the Government of the Federal Districtp. 90
Clients or Citizens? Neighborhood Associations in Mexico Cityp. 114
Favelas and Cortices: Neighborhood Organizing in Sao Paulop. 138
The Dynamics of Protestp. 162
Appendixp. 173
Selected Sourcesp. 182
Indexp. 209
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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