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Tragedy and biblical narrative [electronic resource] : arrows of the Almighty /
J. Cheryl Exum.
imprint
Cambridge [England] ; New York, NY, USA : Cambridge University Press, 1992.
description
xiv, 206 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0521410738 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Cambridge [England] ; New York, NY, USA : Cambridge University Press, 1992.
isbn
0521410738 (hardback)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8374495
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 182-194) and indexes.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1993-01:
After an initial discussion of the place of biblical story in the context of classical definitions of tragedy, the author focuses on the stories of Saul (contrasted with Samson, a comic rather than a tragic figure), Jephthah and his sacrificed daughter, and David and his family. Special attention is given to three women: Jephthah's unnamed daughter; Rizpah, mother of two of Saul's sons; and Michal, Saul's younger daughter and David's wife. The author's analysis of the use of Michal by both the storyteller and the story characters is a particularly effective feminist reading. The work is very successful in applying literary techniques to expose the ambiguities and particularly the shortcomings (e.g., Saul's perfectionism, Jephthah's unfaithfulness, and David's duplicity) in the characters of the heroes and ways in which they are or are not tragic figures. The introduction contains a rich discussion of the interplay of fate, responsibility, guilt, and evil. A valuable contribution to both feminist and literary biblical analysis. Advanced undergraduate; graduate; faculty. R. T. Anderson; Michigan State University
Reviews
Review Quotes
'Exum is one interpreter who faces the dark side of biblical reality without flinching. With a refreshing fidelity to a tradition that struggles with the unintelligible and the contingent ... Exum demonstrates a remarkable literary sensitivity that delights the reader with a well-crafted work of deep insight.' Catholic Biblical Quarterly
'Exum is one interpreter who faces the dark side of biblical reality without flinching. With a refreshing fidelity to a tradition that struggles with the unintelligible and the contingent ... Exum demonstrates a remarkable literary sensitivity that delights the reader with a well-crafted work of deep insight.'Catholic Biblical Quarterly
‘Exum is one interpreter who faces the dark side of biblical reality without flinching. With a refreshing fidelity to a tradition that struggles with the unintelligible and the contingent … Exum demonstrates a remarkable literary sensitivity that delights the reader with a well-crafted work of deep insight.’Catholic Biblical Quarterly
'Exum's analysis of the Hebrew texts is subtle and penetrating.' Theology
'Exum's analysis of the Hebrew texts is subtle and penetrating.'Theology
‘Exum’s analysis of the Hebrew texts is subtle and penetrating.’Theology
'Exum writes beautifully.' JSOT
'Exum writes beautifully.'JSOT
‘Exum writes beautifully.’JSOT
'The book is excellent ... This is a book to read and reread and one which will make a big contribution to current literary readings of the Bible.' Biblical Interpretation
'The book is excellent ... This is a book to read and reread and one which will make a big contribution to current literary readings of the Bible.'Biblical Interpretation
'The book is excellent... This is a book to read and reread and one which will make a big contribution to current literary readings of the Bible.' Biblical Interpretation
‘The book is excellent … This is a book to read and reread and one which will make a big contribution to current literary readings of the Bible.’Biblical Interpretation
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, January 1993
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Description for Bookstore
Using insights about ancient and modern tragedy, this much-praised study offers challenging and provocative new readings of selected biblical narratives: the stories of Saul, Jephthah and Israel's most famous king, David.
Description for Library
This much-praised study offers challenging and provocative new readings of selected biblical narratives: the stories of Saul, Jephthah and Israel's most famous king, David.
Description for Library
Using insights about ancient and modern tragedy, this much-praised study offers challenging and provocative new readings of selected biblical narratives: the stories of Saul, Jephthah and Israel's most famous king, David. Exum discusses how these narratives handle such perennial tragic issues as guilt, suffering, and evil. She suggests that the extraordinary range and power of biblical narrative has its source in the Bible's uncompromising portrayal of reality as embracing despair, as well as resolution.
Main Description
Using insights about ancient and modern tragedy, this much-praised study offers challenging and provocative new readings of selected biblical narratives: the story of Israel's first king, Saul, rejected for his disobedience to God and driven to despair and madness by an evil spirit from the Lord; the story of Jephthah's sacrifice of his daughter in fulfilment of his vow to offer God a sacrifice in return for military victory; the stories of the members of Saul's house, each of whom comes to a tragic end; and the story of Israel's most famous king, David, whose tragedy lies in the burden of divine judgement that falls upon his house as a consequence of his sins. Exum discusses how these narratives handle such perennial tragic issues as guilt, suffering, and evil. She suggests that the extraordinary range and power of biblical narrative has its source in the Bible's uncompromising portrayal of reality as embracing despair, as well as resolution.
Main Description
Using insights about ancient and modern tragedy, this study offers challenging and provocative new readings of selected Biblical narratives: the story of Israel's first king, Saul, rejected for his disobedience to God and driven to madness; the story of Jephthah's sacrifice of his daughter in fulfillment of his vow to offer God a sacrifice in return for military victory; and the story of Israel's most famous king, David, whose tragedy lies in the burden of divine judgement that falls on his house as a consequence of his sins. The book discusses how these narratives handle such perennial tragic issues as guilt, suffering and evil.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgements
About translations and transliterations
Biblical Narrative and the Tragic Vision
the Hostility of God
Excursus: hostile transcendence in the Samson story
the Absence of God
Excursus 1: The awful and sustaining power of words
Excursus 2: Jephthah and his daughter: a feminist reading
The Fate of the House of Saul: Michal and Jonathan; Jonathan; Michal; Abner and Ishbosheth; Rizpah's vigil and the tragic end of the House of Saul
the Judgement of God
Afterword
Notes
Bibliography
Index of authors
Index of proper names
Index of citations
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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