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Traders, planters, and slaves [electronic resource] : market behavior in early English America /
David W. Galenson.
imprint
Cambridge [Cambridgeshire] ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1986.
description
xiv, 230 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0521308453
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Cambridge [Cambridgeshire] ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1986.
isbn
0521308453
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
general note
Includes index.
catalogue key
8374483
 
Bibliography: p. 217-223.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1986-10:
Galenson is a member of the economics department of the University of Chicago and a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research. In this study he analyzes the operation of the slave industry in the late 17th and early 18th centuries. He centers his study on the Royal African Company, the largest British company engaged in the slave trade. Galenson provides a detailed analysis of the market behavior of the Royal African Company and their principal customers, the sugar planters of the Caribbean. The author traces the Atlantic slave trade; the shipping and the mortality of the slave trade; the sale of slaves; the demographic composition of the slave trade; and the economic structure of the early Atlantic slave trade. This is an excellent work. The bibliography, footnotes, and appendixes are carefully done and are of great value to other researchers. This book is extremely provocative and because of its advanced nature, the volume is most beneficial for graduate students and faculty.-R.J. Wechman, Borough of Manhattan Community College, CUNY
Reviews
Review Quotes
'Galenson's book is a welcome addition to the growing literature on economic institutions. Using a blend of cliometric techniques and institutional analyses, he mines the economic and demographic data in the records of the Royal African Company to reconstruct the organization of the seventeenth-century slave trade. The result is a detailed demonstration that this trade took place in a highly organized and sophisticated market. The book will be of interest not just to economic historians of slavery, but to everyone interested in the evolution of modern economic organization and exchange.' Douglass C. North, Washington University
'Galenson's book is a welcome addition to the growing literature on economic institutions. Using a blend of cliometric techniques and institutional analyses, he mines the economic and demographic data in the records of the Royal African Company to reconstruct the organization of the seventeenth-century slave trade. The result is a detailed demonstration that this trade took place in a highly organized and sophisticated market. The book will be of interest not just to economic historians of slavery, but to everyone interested in the evolution of modern economic organization and exchange.'Douglass C. North, Washington University
'Traders, Planters, and Slaves analyzes nearly 75,000 transactions of the Royal African Company to explore the operations of the slave trade, the economy of the sugar islands, and the efficiency of markets in early modern history. It illuminates all three subjects and is essential reading for students of the Atlantic world during the colonial era. In the best tradition of cliometrics, Galenson combines a historian's careful reading of archival material with an economist's theoretical precision to produce a model of social science history.' Russell R. Menard, University of Minnesota
'Traders, Planters, and Slaves analyzes nearly 75,000 transactions of the Royal African Company to explore the operations of the slave trade, the economy of the sugar islands, and the efficiency of markets in early modern history. It illuminates all three subjects and is essential reading for students of the Atlantic world during the colonial era. In the best tradition of cliometrics, Galenson combines a historian's careful reading of archival material with an economist's theoretical precision to produce a model of social science history.'Russell R. Menard, University of Minnesota
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, October 1986
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Description for Bookstore
This book explores the operation of the Atlantic slave trade industry in the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries, focusing on the market behaviour of the Royal African Company - the largest English company engaged in the slave trade - and the sugar planters of the Caribbean.
Description for Library
The explosive growth of the Atlantic slave trade in the second half of the seventeenth century made the international trade in Africans one of the world's largest industries. This book explores the operation of that industry in the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries, focusing on the market behaviour of the Royal African Company - the largest English company engaged in the slave trade - and the sugar planters of the Caribbean, who were the trade's principal customers in English America.
Main Description
The explosive growth of the Atlantic slave trade in the second half of the seventeenth century made the international trade in Africans one of the world's largest industries. This book explores the operation of that industry in the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries, focusing on the market behaviour of the Royal African Company - the largest English company engaged in the slave trade - and the sugar planters of the Caribbean, who were the trade's principal customers in English America. A richly detailed portrayal of the slave trade to English America emerges, one that shows it to have been a highly competitive and efficient transatlantic market. In revealing the existence of sophisticated and complex market behaviour in this early period of black slavery in the New World, the book adds to our understanding of the development of large-scale competitive markets, as well as to our knowledge of the efficiency of resource allocation in early English America.
Table of Contents
List of tables
Preface
The Atlantic slave trade and the early development of the English West Indies
Shipping and mortality
Slave prices in the Barbados market, 1673-1723
On the order of purchases by characteristics at slave sales
The demographic composition of the slave trade: an economic investigation
Establishing geographic persistence from market observations: population turnover among estate owners and managers in Barbados and Jamaica, 1673-1725
The economic structure of the early Atlantic slave trade: the challenge of Adam Smith's analysis
Appendices
Notes
Selected bibliography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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