Catalogue

COVID-19: Updates on library services and operations.

The Soviet study of international relations [electronic resource] /
Allen Lynch.
imprint
Cambridge [Cambridgeshire] ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1987.
description
xii, 197 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0521330556
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Cambridge [Cambridgeshire] ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1987.
isbn
0521330556
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
general note
Includes index.
catalogue key
8373271
 
Bibliography: p. 174-194.
A Look Inside
Awards
This item was nominated for the following awards:
Marshall Shulman Book Prize, USA, 1988 : Won
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1988-09-01:
Despite the extensive literature in the West concerning Soviet foreign policy behavior, relatively little scholarly attention has been paid to the Soviet theory of international relations, either as a serious body of thought or its effects on Soviet foreign policy. Now two new books, each worthy in its own way, present thoughtful studies of Soviet international relations theory. The small overlap between them is surprising: they are complementary in coverage rather than differing in their views of the same issue. Light's book analyzes official Soviet international relations theory from the origins of the Soviet state to the present. Her primary sources are speeches and writings of authoritative Soviet spokesmen and party and government documents. Although Light uses works on international relations theory from Soviet research institutes, these sources are for the most part supplementary. Lynch, on the other hand, concentrates primarily on the development of Soviet international relations theory in these research institutes since the mid-1950s and shows that some of the recent theoretical works have a range, diversity, and complexity that will surprise many outside the Soviet bloc. In a sense, then, Light is strongest in explaining the official international relations theory and showing how it has developed some basic internal contradictions, while Lynch provides more detail about the studies of international relations theory in Soviet research centers and how they may indicate possible future theoretical directions. On the whole, Light does a better job than Lynch of connecting the theory to Soviet practices. She shows how theory is used to legitimize Soviet leaders, justify their foreign policy actions, and provide at least the terminology and conceptual framework for decision makers, although it is too imprecise to serve as an infallible guide to Soviet behavior. If a library can afford both books, they are desirable additions, but Light's study probably will be more useful to undergraduates. Both studies contain extensive notes and bibliographies. J. M. Scolnick, Jr. Clinch Valley College of the University of Virginia
Reviews
Review Quotes
'This book comes just at the right moment ... [It] is important firstly for the account it provides of changes in methodologies and assumptions, and secondly for its survey of related changes in Soviet views of the world over the last twenty years ... This book stands out from previous treatments of the subject by virtue of its author's talent for distinguishing the essential from the inessential in the sometimes cryptic Soviet literature. It deserves a wide readership.' Neil Malcolm, Soviet Studies
'This book comes just at the right moment ... [It] is important firstly for the account it provides of changes in methodologies and assumptions, and secondly for its survey of related changes in Soviet views of the world over the last twenty years ... This book stands out from previous treatments of the subject by virtue of its author's talent for distinguishing the essential from the inessential in the sometimes cryptic Soviet literature. It deserves a wide readership.'Neil Malcolm, Soviet Studies
‘This book comes just at the right moment … [It] is important firstly for the account it provides of changes in methodologies and assumptions, and secondly for its survey of related changes in Soviet views of the world over the last twenty years … This book stands out from previous treatments of the subject by virtue of its author’s talent for distinguishing the essential from the inessential in the sometimes cryptic Soviet literature. It deserves a wide readership.’Neil Malcolm, Soviet Studies
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, September 1988
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Description for Bookstore
This book examines what observers of foreign policy within the Soviet Union have been saying to each other over the last twenty years. The author shows how phenomena such as nuclear warfare, western prosperity, and the Sino-Soviet split have enforced analysts to diverge from Leninist orthodoxy, giving a surprisingly complex and sophisticated analysis of world politics.
Main Description
'Dr Lynch's book is an insightful and incisive examination of Soviet theories and concepts of international politics and foreign policy. Not only does he provide a concise exposition of the orthodox Marxist, Leninist and Stalinist foundations of Soviet thinking on international affairs, but he also examines the important departures from that orthodoxy under Khrushchev and Brezhnev. More important, however, he focuses on the intellectual ferment which characterized the infrastructure of the Soviet foreign policy establishment during the past twenty years ... His elegantly written words and powerful expository style enable us to understand better both Soviet thinking and Soviet behaviour in international affairs.' Vernon Aspaturian, Chair of the Shulman Prize Committee, 1987
Main Description
'Dr Lynch's book is an insightful and incisive examination of Soviet theories and concepts of international politics and foreign policy. Not only does he provide a concise exposition of the orthodox Marxist, Leninist and Stalinist foundations of Soviet thinking on international affairs, but he also examines the important departures from that orthodoxy under Khrushchev and Brezhnev. More important, however, he focuses on the intellectual ferment which characterized the infrastructure of the Soviet foreign policy establishment during the past twenty years ... His elegantly written words and powerful expository style enable us to understand better both Soviet thinking and Soviet behaviour in international affairs.'Vernon Aspaturian, Chair of the Shulman Prize Committee, 1987
Main Description
‘Dr Lynch’s book is an insightful and incisive examination of Soviet theories and concepts of international politics and foreign policy. Not only does he provide a concise exposition of the orthodox Marxist, Leninist and Stalinist foundations of Soviet thinking on international affairs, but he also examines the important departures from that orthodoxy under Khrushchev and Brezhnev. More important, however, he focuses on the intellectual ferment which characterized the infrastructure of the Soviet foreign policy establishment during the past twenty years … His elegantly written words and powerful expository style enable us to understand better both Soviet thinking and Soviet behaviour in international affairs.’Vernon Aspaturian, Chair of the Shulman Prize Committee, 1987
Main Description
This systematic observation of foreign policy within the Soviet Union shows how such phenomena as nuclear warfare, continued Western prosperity, and the Sino-Soviet split have forced analysts to diverge sharply from traditional Leninist orthodoxy. The result has been a Soviet analysis of world politics that is considerably more complex and politically sophisticated than westerners often assume. This is manifested in an increasingly multipolar world view, accepting the continued existence of the United States, in which the USSR is seen as an integral component of an international system rather than simply as the center of a unique and expanding system of its own. Fundamental to this changing perspective is the perception that no Soviet interests could possibly be served by nuclear war. In an extended preface to this paperback edition, Allen Lynch examines the impact of the recent Gorbachev reform initiative on the intellectual basis of Soviet foreign policy.
Table of Contents
Forewordp. xi
Acknowledgementsp. xiv
Introduction: the "New Political Thinking" and Soviet Foreign Policy: Intellectual Origins and Political Consequencesp. xv
Motive forces behind the "new political thinking"p. xix
Leadership support for the "new thinking"p. xxii
How have the parameters of discussion changed?p. xxx
How has the role of foreign-policy specialists changed?p. xxxvi
Conclusionp. xxxviii
Introduction to the First Editionp. 1
A note on methodologyp. 6
The Background: Marx, Lenin, Stalin and the Theory of International Relationsp. 8
Marx and Engelsp. 8
Lenin: "imperialism"p. 14
Stalin: "socialism in one country"p. 18
Stalin's dispute with Vargap. 20
The Development of Soviet Political Studiesp. 26
Approaches to International Relationsp. 32
Introductionp. 32
The early Brezhnev periodp. 34
Toward a Soviet sociology of international relationsp. 49
Substantive applicationsp. 60
Conclusionp. 68
The Systems Approach and International Relationsp. 71
Soviet critiques of Western systems methodsp. 72
The development of a Soviet systems approachp. 78
The Structure of the International System: The Systems Levelp. 89
Criteria of evaluation: power, correlation of forces, and the balance of powerp. 89
The new correlation of forces and emerging multipolaritiesp. 95
The place of Soviet-American relations in the international systemp. 104
Critical Subsystemsp. 108
Inter-"imperialist" relationsp. 108
Inter-socialist relationsp. 116
International organizationp. 124
Summaryp. 128
The Scientific-Technical Revolution and the Changing Face of International Relationsp. 131
A new factor in international relations: the scientific-technical revolutionp. 133
Conclusionp. 140
Notesp. 149
Bibliographyp. 174
Indexp. 195
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem