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A social history of dying [electronic resource] /
Allan Kellehear.
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2007.
description
x, 297 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0521694299 (pbk.), 9780521694292
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2007.
isbn
0521694299 (pbk.)
9780521694292
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8373096
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 257-280) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Allan Kellehear is Professor of Sociology at the University of Bath, UK
Reviews
Review Quotes
'A comprehensive text which will be of interest to anyone working in the field of death and dying or who is interested in its history.' Network Review
'This is no ordinary book. The next generation of death scholars will have to come to terms with it. And it is superb in showing how sociology can illuminate the findings of archaeology and history.' Times Higher Education Supplement
This item was reviewed in:
Globe & Mail, July 2007
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Chapters include: The dawn of mortal awareness; the otherworld journey, death as dying; the emergence of sedentism; the birth of the good death; the exponential rise of modernity; and the birth of the shameful death.
Description for Bookstore
A Social History of Dying, first published in 2007, takes the reader on a 2 million year journey and examines the major challenges we will all eventually face: anticipating, preparing, taming and timing for our eventual deaths. This is a major review of the human and clinical sciences literature about human dying conduct.
Description for Bookstore
A Social History of Dying takes the reader on a 2 million year journey and examines the major challenges we will all eventually face: anticipating, preparing, taming and timing for our eventual deaths. This is a major review of the human and clinical sciences literature about human dying conduct.
Description for Library
Our experiences of dying have been shaped by ancient ideas about death and social responsibility at the end of life. In A Social History of Dying, Allan Kellehear takes the reader on a 2 million year journey examining the major challenges we will all eventually face: anticipating, preparing, taming and timing for our eventual deaths. Arguing that we are witnessing a rise in shameful forms of dying, Allan Kellehear shows that the greatest moral tests facing modern dying conduct include poverty, aging and social exclusion.
Long Description
Our experiences of dying have been shaped by ancient ideas about death and social responsibility at the end of life. From Stone Age ideas about dying as otherworld journey to the contemporary Cosmopolitan Age of dying in nursing homes, Allan Kellehear takes the reader on a 2 million year journey of discovery that covers the major challenges we will all eventually face: anticipating, preparing, taming and timing for our eventual deaths. This is a major review of the human and clinical sciences literature about human dying conduct. The historical approach of this book places our recent images of cancer dying and medical care in broader historical, epidemiological and global context. Professor Kellehear argues that we are witnessing a rise in shameful forms of dying. It is not cancer, heart disease or medical science that presents modern dying conduct with its greatest moral tests, but rather poverty, aging and social exclusion.
Main Description
Our experiences of dying have been shaped by ancient ideas about death and social responsibility at the end of life. From Stone Age ideas about dying as otherworld journey to the contemporary Cosmopolitan Age of dying in nursing homes, Allan Kellehear takes the reader on a 2 million year journey of discovery that covers the major challenges we will all eventually face: anticipating, preparing, taming and timing for our eventual deaths. This book, first published in 2007, is a major review of the human and clinical sciences literature about human dying conduct. The historical approach of this book places our recent images of cancer dying and medical care in broader historical, epidemiological and global context. Professor Kellehear argues that we are witnessing a rise in shameful forms of dying. It is not cancer, heart disease or medical science that presents modern dying conduct with its greatest moral tests, but rather poverty, ageing and social exclusion.
Main Description
Our experiences of dying have been shaped by ancient ideas about death and social responsibility at the end of life. From Stone Age ideas about dying as otherworld journey to the contemporary Cosmopolitan Age of dying in nursing homes, Allan Kellehear takes the reader on a 2 million year journey of discovery that covers the major challenges we will all eventually face: anticipating, preparing, taming and timing for our eventual deaths. This is a major review of the human and clinical sciences literature about human dying conduct. The historical approach of this book places our recent images of cancer dying and medical care in broader historical, epidemiological and global context. Professor Kellehear argues that we are witnessing a rise in shameful forms of dying. It is not cancer, heart disease or medical science that presents modern dying conduct with its greatest moral tests, but rather poverty, ageing and social exclusion.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgementsp. ix
Introductionp. 1
The Stone Age
The Dawn of Mortal Awarenessp. 11
Otherworld Journeys: Death as Dyingp. 28
The First Challenge: Anticipating Deathp. 47
The Pastoral Age
The Emergence of Sedentismp. 69
The Birth of the Good Deathp. 87
The Second Challenge: Preparing for Deathp. 105
The Age of the City
The Rise and Spread of Citiesp. 125
The Birth of the Well-Managed Deathp. 147
The Third Challenge: Taming Deathp. 169
The Cosmopolitan Age
The Exponential Rise of Modernityp. 191
The Birth of the Shameful Deathp. 213
The Final Challenge: Timing Deathp. 234
Conclusionp. 251
Bibliographyp. 257
Indexp. 281
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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