Catalogue

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Slave emancipation and racial attitudes in nineteenth-century South Africa [electronic resource] /
R.L. Watson.
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2012.
description
xv, 318 p. : maps ; 24 cm.
ISBN
1107022002 (hardback), 9781107022003 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2012.
isbn
1107022002 (hardback)
9781107022003 (hardback)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Machine generated contents note: Introduction; Part I. THE FOUNDATIONS oF a RACIAL ORDER: 1. The passing of the slave system; 2. Labor and the economy; Part II. CULTURAL AND POLITICAL FACTORS: 3. Missions; 4. Respectability; 5. The frontier; 6. The trek; 7. Plagues; Part III. RAPE, rACE, AND VIOLENCE: 8. Violence; 9. Rape and other crimes; 10. Honor; Part IV. A RACIAL ORDER: 11. Sediment at the bottom of the mind; 12. An aristocracy of skin; Appendix.
abstract
"This book examines the social transformation wrought by the abolition of slavery in 1834 in South Africa's Cape Colony. It pays particular attention to the effects of socioeconomic and cultural changes in the way both freed slaves and dominant whites adjusted to the new world. It compares South Africa's relatively peaceful transition from a slave to a non-slave society to the bloody experience of the US South after abolition, analyzing rape hysteria in both places as well as the significance of changing concepts of honor in the Cape. Finally, the book examines the early development of South Africa's particular brand of racism, arguing that abolition, not slavery itself, was a causative factor; although racist attitudes were largely absent while slavery persisted, they grew incrementally but steadily after abolition, driven primarily by whites' need for secure, exploitable labor"--
catalogue key
8373027
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
Advance praise: 'This book, based on meticulous research, is well written and at times deliciously sharp. It provides an unprecedented account of the ways in which both the slaves of the Cape Colony and their erstwhile owners reorganized their intertwined lives in the aftermath of abolition. For the first time, a description of Cape society is combined with a clear understanding of the shifting social ideologies that led to an enhanced South African racism. It is a singular achievement.' Robert Ross, Leiden University
'Rick Watson's accessible book admirably synthesizes existing scholarship with his new research, and, by focusing on the era of slave emancipation at the Cape, makes an important contribution to knowledge of the origins of South African racism.' Christopher Saunders, University of Cape Town
'This book, based on meticulous research, is well written and at times deliciously sharp. It provides an unprecedented account of the ways in which both the slaves of the Cape Colony and their erstwhile owners reorganized their intertwined lives in the aftermath of abolition. For the first time, a description of Cape society is combined with a clear understanding of the shifting social ideologies that led to an enhanced South African racism. It is a singular achievement.' Robert Ross, Leiden University
'This is a critical study of a much neglected period - the decades around and after slave emancipation in the 1830s - and its impact on the racial structuring of the Cape Colony. Watson writes with vigor and insight, offering fresh perspectives on a vital topic in South African history, with comparative insights from North American scholarship.' Nigel Worden, University of Cape Town
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Examining the significance of the abolition of slavery in South Africa's Cape Colony in 1834, this book explores the development of a distinctive type of racism that shaped South African race relations.
Description for Bookstore
This book examines the social transformation wrought by the abolition of slavery in 1834 in South Africa's Cape Colony, tracing the effects of socio-economic and cultural factors in the development of a distinctive type of racism that shaped South African race relations for centuries to come.
Main Description
This book examines the social transformation wrought by the abolition of slavery in 1834 in South Africa's Cape Colony. It pays particular attention to the effects of socioeconomic and cultural changes in the way both freed slaves and dominant whites adjusted to the new world. It compares South Africa's relatively peaceful transition from a slave- to a non-slave society to the bloody experience of the U.S. South after abolition, analyzing rape hysteria in both places as well as the significance of changing concepts of honor in the Cape. Finally, the book examines the early development of South Africa's particular brand of racism, arguing that abolition, not slavery itself, was a causative factor; although racist attitudes were largely absent while slavery persisted, they grew incrementally but steadily after abolition, driven primarily by whites' need for secure, exploitable labor.
Table of Contents
List of Mapsp. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Abbreviations Used in Text and Footnotesp. xiii
Introductionp. i
The Foundations of a Racial Order
The Passing of the Slave Systemp. 11
Labor and the Economyp. 35
Cultural and Political Factors
Missionsp. 63
Respectabilityp. 82
The Frontierp. 108
The Trekp. 129
Plaguesp. 143
Rape, Race, and Violence
Violencep. 167
Rape and Other Crimesp. 184
Honorp. 204
A Racial Order
Sediment at the Bottom of the Mindp. 239
An Aristocracy of Skinp. 265
Appendix: The Newspapersp. 289
Archival Sources and B ibliographyp. 295
Indexp. 311
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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