Catalogue


Shadows of empire [electronic resource] : the Indian nobility of Cusco, 1750-1825 /
David T. Garrett.
imprint
Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2005.
description
xviii, 300 p. ill., maps ; 24 cm.
ISBN
052184634X (hardback)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2005.
isbn
052184634X (hardback)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8372876
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 273-287) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2006-11-01:
This revised PhD dissertation focuses on the political status of the indigenous elites of late colonial southern Peru and western Bolivia. The first third of the volume reviews the establishment of the Republica de Indios as a legal space; the second part details the political, economic, and social status of the "Indian" elite in "Alta Peru" during the 1700s; the third section describes the impact upon the indigenous political elites of new royal Spanish reform decrees from 1780 to 1825. The approach is one that views the non-European population from an Iberian peninsular perspective. Although there are some disclaimers, the Indian populations are effectively conceived of as a single monolithic social entity, whether of Aymara or Quechua heritage. While Cuzco loosely defines an ideal geographic focus, supporting anecdotal evidence is widely selected from Andahuaylas to Oruro. Because of this perspective, the primary audience will be Latin American historians. The index is limited mainly to proper names. Adequate bibliography and footnotes, and a dozen tables and maps. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. D. L. Browman Washington University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"This is a fine-grained study, meticulously researched and scrupulously written, and it represents a considerable achievement. It should remain the standard reference on the late colonial vicissitudes of the Inca nobles and other indigenous elites in southern Peru. Its emphasis on social divergence within interlocking indigenous, and even non-indigenous, elites and local governance has significant implications for the study of politics, society, and power well beyond the colonial era. -David Cahill, University of New South Wales, American Historical Review
"This is a fine-grained study, meticulously researched and scrupulously written, and it represents a considerable achievement. It should remain the standard reference on the late colonial vicissitudes of the Inca nobles and other indigenous elites in southern Peru. Its emphasis on social divergence within interlocking indigenous, and even non-indigenous, elites and local governance has significant implications for the study of politics, society, and power well beyond the colonial era.
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, November 2006
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
After the Spanish conquest of Peru, the old Inca nobility retained much of its power and status in the region of Cusco. David Garrett examines their place in Spanish colonial society & how the old Inca collapsed finally in the wake of the Túpac Amaru rebellion in the late 18th century.
Description for Bookstore
The Indian nobility of the Andes occupied a crucial economic and political position in late colonial Andean society, a position widely accepted as legitimate until the Túpac Amaru rebellion. Shadows of Empire, first published in 2005, traces the history of this elite and examines the pre-conquest and colonial foundations of their privilege and authority.
Description for Bookstore
The Indian nobility of the Andes occupied a crucial economic and political position in late colonial Andean society, a position widely accepted as legitimate until the Túpac Amaru rebellion. Shadows of Empire traces the history of this elite and examines the pre-conquest and colonial foundations of their privilege and authority.
Main Description
The Indian nobility of the Andes - largely descended from the Inca monarchs and other pre-conquest lords - occupied a crucial economic and political position in late colonial Andean society, a position widely accepted as legitimate until the Túpac Amaru rebellion. Shadows of Empire, first published in 2005, traces the history of this late colonial elite and examines the pre-conquest and colonial foundations of their privilege and authority. It brings to light the organization and the ideology of the Indian nobility in the bishopric of Cusco in the decades before the rebellion, and uses this nobility as a lens through which to study the internal organization and tension of late colonial Indian communities. The work analyzes the significance of the collapse of the Indian nobility, both repudiated by the Indian commons and the crown in the last years of Spanish rule, following the rebellion to the emergence of the creole-dominated republican order after 1825.
Main Description
The Indian nobility of the Andes--largely descended from the Inca monarchs and other pre-conquest lords--occupied a crucial economic and political position in late colonial Andean society, a position widely accepted as legitimate until the Tupac Amaru rebellion. This volume traces the history of this late colonial elite and examines the pre-conquest and colonial foundations of their privilege and authority. It brings to light the organization and the ideology of the Indian nobility in the bishopric of Cusco in the decades before the rebellion, and uses this nobility as a lens through which to study the internal organization and tension of late colonial Indian communities.
Description for Bookstore
The Indian nobility of the Andes occupied a crucial economic and political position in late colonial Andean society, a position widely accepted as legitimate until the Tpac Amaru rebellion. Shadows of Empire, first published in 2005, traces the history of this elite and examines the pre-conquest and colonial foundations of their privilege and authority.
Main Description
The Indian nobility of the Andes - largely descended from the Inca monarchs and other pre-conquest lords - occupied a crucial economic and political position in late colonial Andean society, a position widely accepted as legitimate until the Tpac Amaru rebellion. Shadows of Empire, first published in 2005, traces the history of this late colonial elite and examines the pre-conquest and colonial foundations of their privilege and authority. It brings to light the organization and the ideology of the Indian nobility in the bishopric of Cusco in the decades before the rebellion, and uses this nobility as a lens through which to study the internal organization and tension of late colonial Indian communities. The work analyzes the significance of the collapse of the Indian nobility, both repudiated by the Indian commons and the crown in the last years of Spanish rule, following the rebellion to the emergence of the creole-dominated republican order after 1825.
Table of Contents
Indian Elites and the Colonial Order
Spanish conquest and the Habsburg reforms
The long seventeenth century
The Indian Nobility of Bourbon Cusco
Cacical families and provincial nobilities
Communal economies and Indian fortunes
The politics of the Cacicazgo
Crisis and Collapse
From reform to rebellion
The breakdown of colonial order
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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