Catalogue

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Romanticism, revolution and language [electronic resource] : the fate of the word from Samuel Johnson to George Eliot /
John Beer.
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2009.
description
xi, 232 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0521897556, 9780521897556
format(s)
Book
More Details
author
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2009.
isbn
0521897556
9780521897556
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8372441
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Description for Bookstore
A leading scholar in Romantic literature and theology, John Beer offers a persuasive new account of post-revolutionary continuities between the major Romantic writers and their Victorian successors. This 2009 book traces the impact of revolution on language, from Blake, Coleridge and Wordsworth, to Hazlitt, Austen, Gaskell and George Eliot.
Description for Bookstore
A leading scholar in Romantic literature and theology, John Beer offers a persuasive new account of post-revolutionary continuities between the major Romantic writers and their Victorian successors. This book traces the impact of revolution on language, from Blake, Coleridge and Wordsworth, to Hazlitt, Austen, Gaskell and George Eliot.
Main Description
The repercussions of the French Revolution included erosion of many previously held certainties in Britain, as in the rest of Europe. Even the authority of language as a cornerstone of knowledge was called into question and the founding principles of intellectual disciplines challenged, as Romantic writers developed new ways of expressing their philosophy of the imagination and the human heart. This 2009 book traces the impact of revolution on language, from William Blake, Samuel Taylor Coleridge and William Wordsworth, to William Hazlitt, Jane Austen, Elizabeth Gaskell and George Eliot. A leading scholar in Romantic literature and theology, John Beer offers a persuasive new account of post-revolutionary continuities between the major Romantic writers and their Victorian successors.
Main Description
The repercussions of the French Revolution included erosion of many previously held certainties in Britain, as in the rest of Europe. Even the authority of language as a cornerstone of knowledge was called into question and the founding principles of intellectual disciplines challenged, as Romantic writers developed new ways of expressing their philosophy of the imagination and the human heart. This book traces the impact of revolution on language, from William Blake, Samuel Taylor Coleridge and William Wordsworth, to William Hazlitt, Jane Austen, Elizabeth Gaskell and George Eliot. A leading scholar in Romantic literature and theology, John Beer offers a persuasive new account of post-revolutionary continuities between the major Romantic writers and their Victorian successors.
Table of Contents
Index
Preface and acknowledgmentsp. vii
List of abbreviationsp. viii
'Democracy' in Somerset and beyondp. 1
Politics, sensibility and the quest for adequacy of languagep. 21
The heart of Lyrical Balladsp. 45
The Prelude: a poem in processp. 61
Words or images? Blake's representation of historyp. 80
Blake, Coleridge and 'The Riddle of the World'p. 99
Challenges from the non-verbal and return to the Wordp. 113
The Nature of Hazlitt's tastep. 132
Jane Austen's progressp. 156
Languages of memory and passion: Tennyson, Gaskell and the Brontesp. 175
George Eliot and the future of languagep. 200
Indexp. 225
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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