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Romans and the apologetic tradition [electronic resource] : the purpose, genre, and audience of Paul's letter /
Anthony J. Guerra.
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1995.
description
xiii, 200 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0521471265 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1995.
isbn
0521471265 (hardback)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8372433
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 182-190) and indexes.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1995-11:
Guerra (Univ. of Bridgeport) argues that Paul's letter to the Romans belongs to the ancient classical genre protreptikos l'ogos and addresses an audience of mostly Jewish Christians. Protreptic is the genre of the apologist with a dual intent: confirm the believer's confidence in the truth and convert the nonbeliever to it. Protreptic urges adoption of a particular way of life (or deeper commitment to it), setting out its advantages, replying to objections, and demonstrating its superiority. Paul, however, transforms the characteristic thrust of ethnocentric apologetics, as his intent is not to argue for the superiority of one race/religion over the other but to assert human solidarity in Christ. This investigation of Romans works with the presupposition that Romans is written rationally to achieve the author's purpose. Guerra argues that the protreptic analysis of Romans reveals its underlying logical unity. Motif analysis of Romans yields a preponderant correspondence between apologetic theology and Paul's communication to Rome. Apologetic orientation subordinates apocalyptic themes. Pauline apologetic stands between Hellenistic Jewish tradition and second-century Christian apologists. This book breaks new ground and invites further investigation. Extensive bibliography, limited one-page glossary. Upper-division undergraduate; graduate; faculty. J. W. McCant; Point Loma Nazarene College
Reviews
Review Quotes
"...a lucid and insightful discussion of the implications of reading Romans as a proteptic letter and for showing us where futher research is needed." The Catholic Biblical Quarterly
"Guerra's well-supported thesis will have significant impact on future studies of this epistle." Kirk Summers, Religious Studies Review
"...makes a valuable contribution to the discussion of the literary genre of Romans and can be recommended to anyone interested in a serious study of Romans." Thomas H. Tobin, Anglican Theological Review
"This book breaks new ground and invites further investigation." Choice
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, November 1995
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Summaries
Description for Bookstore
Guerra illuminates one of the most significant writings in western religious history, and shows how classical Greek and hellenistic philosophical/ethical traditions have informed Romans - especially the protreptic genre, or the class of writing in antiquity which advocates the adoption of a particular way of life.
Description for Library
This study shows how classical Greek and hellenistic philosophical and ethical traditions inform Paul's Letter to the Romans. It concentrates especially on protreptic, a kind of literature deriving its name from the title of a lost writing of Aristotle that has been largely reconstructed by scholars in our time. The protreptic writers seek to awaken their readers to a realisation of human frailty and then to commit themselves to a new way of life. Guerra shows also how the political conditions of Nero's Rome are reflected in Romans.
Main Description
Of all the letters in the Pauline corpus, the Letter to the Romans has attracted the greatest degree of scholarly attention. Yet surprisingly scant consideration has been given to the question of its literary genre. Taking up the comparatively brief suggestions of previous scholars, Dr Guerra argues that the Letter belongs to the protreptic genre - the class of writing in antiquity which urges the adoption of a particular way of life (or a deeper commitment to it), setting out its advantages, replying to objections, and demonstrating its superiority. Working through each chapter of the Letter in turn, he indicates how Paul provides a critique of non-Christian ways of life (both Jewish and Gentile) and affirms the superiority of the Christian Gospel. It becomes apparent that the Pauline apologetics of Romans stand between the hellenistic Jewish tradition and the later Greek Christian apologists, and may have influenced the latter.
Main Description
This study shows how classical Greek and Hellenistic philosophical and ethical traditions inform Paul's Letter to the Romans. It concentrates especially on Protreptic, a kind of literature deriving its name from the title of a lost writing of Aristotle that has been largely reconstructed by scholars in our time. The Protreptic writers seek to awaken their readers to a realization of human frailty and then to commit themselves to a new way of life. Guerra shows also how the political conditions of Nero's Rome are reflected herein.
Table of Contents
Preface
List of abbreviations
Apologetic and audience: making the message meet
Apologetic motifs in Romans 1.18-3.31
Romans 4: the continuation of apologetic argumentation
Paul recommends and defends the gospel of God
Romans 9-11: Paul defends his mission to the Gentiles for the sake of the Jews
Romans 12-13 and 16: the 'Roman factor'
Summary and conclusion
Appendix
Glossary
Select Bibliography
Indexes
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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