Catalogue


'Religion' and the religions in the English Enlightenment [electronic resource] /
Peter Harrison.
imprint
Cambridge [England] ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1990.
description
ix, 277 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
052138530X
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Cambridge [England] ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1990.
isbn
052138530X
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8371942
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [242]-267) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Professor Harrison has produced a meticulously documented, systematically organized, and challenging monograph. His use of the printed literature and sources of the period is exemplary. Although a demanding exercise in intellectual history, this book is profoundly significant for scholars concerned with English religious thought." Albion
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Summaries
Main Description
This study examines the changes which took place in the understanding of 'religion' and 'the religions' during the Enlightenment in England, the period when the decisive break with Patristic, Medieval and Renaissance notions of religion occurred. Dr Harrison's view is that the principles of the English Enlightenment not only made a special contribution to our modern understanding of what religion is, but they pioneered, in addition, the 'scientific', or non-religious approach, to religious phenomena. During this period a crisis of authority in the Church necessitated a rational enquiry into the various forms of Christianity, and in addition, into the claims of all religions. This led to a concept of 'religion' (based on 'natural' theology) which could link together the apparently disparate religious beliefs and practices found in the empirical religions.
Bowker Data Service Summary
The origins of the modern idea of religion can be traced to the enlightenment. This book shows how the concept of religion and the religions arose out of controversies in 17th and 18th century England.
Description for Library
The origins of the modern idea of religion can be traced to the Enlightenment. This book shows how the concept of 'religion' and 'the religions' arose out of controversies in seventeenth- and eighteenth-century England. The birth of 'the religions', conceived to be sets of beliefs and practices, enabled the establishment of a new science of religion in which the various 'religions' were studied and impartially compared. Dr Harrison gives a detailed historical picture of the emergence of comparative religion as an academic discipline.
Main Description
The origin of the modern perception of religion can be traced to the Enlightenment. This book shows how the concepts of "religion" and "the religions" arose from controversies in seventeenth- and eighteenth-century England. The birth of "the religions," conceived of as sets of beliefs and practices, created a new science of religion in which the various "religions" could be studied and impartially compared. Harrison gives a detailed historical picture of the emergence of this concept and how it led to the discipline of comparative religion.
Description for Bookstore
This book shows how the concept of 'religion' and 'the religions' arose out of controversies in seventeenth- and eighteenth-century England. The birth of 'the religions', conceived to be sets of beliefs and practices, enabled the establishment of a new science of religion in which the various 'religions' were studied and impartially compared.
Table of Contents
Introduction
Antecedents
+Religion+, revelation, and the light of nature: Protestants and Platonists
The religious instinct and priestly corruptions: Lord Herbert and deism
Sacred history and religious diversity
From sacred history to natural history
Epilogue
Notes
References
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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