Catalogue

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Puritanism and theatre [electronic resource] : Thomas Middleton and opposition drama under the early Stuarts /
Margot Heinemann.
imprint
Cambridge [Cambridgeshire] ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1980.
description
ix, 300 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0521226023
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Cambridge [Cambridgeshire] ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1980.
isbn
0521226023
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8371390
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Description for Bookstore
The closing of the theatres by Parliament in 1642 is perhaps the best-known fact in the history of English drama. As the Parliamentary Puritans were then in power, it is easy to assume that all opponents of the theatre were Puritans, and that all Puritans were hostile to the drama.
Description for Library
The closing of the theatres by Parliament in 1642 is perhaps the best-known fact in the history of English drama. As the Parliamentary Puritans were then in power, it is easy to assume that all opponents of the theatre were Puritans, and that all Puritans were hostile to the drama. The reality was more interesting and more complicated. Margot Heinemann looks at Thomas Middleton's work in relation to the society and social movements of his time, and traces the connections this work may have had with radical, Parliamentarian or Puritan groups or movements.
Main Description
The closing of the theatres by Parliament in 1642 is perhaps the best-known fact in the history of English drama. As the Parliamentary Puritans were then in power, it is easy to assume that all opponents of the theatre were Puritans, and that all Puritans were hostile to the drama. The reality was more interesting and more complicated. Margot Heinemann looks at Thomas Middleton's work in relation to the society and social movements of his time, and traces the connections this work may have had with radical, Parliamentarian or Puritan groups or movements. In the light of the recent work of seventeenth-century historians we can no longer see these complex opposition movements as uniformly anti-theatre or anti-dramatist. The book suggests fresh meanings and implications in Middleton's own writings, and helps towards rethinking the place of drama in the changing life of early Stuart England.
Table of Contents
Introductory note
Time and place
Puritanism, censorship and opposition to the theatre
Middleton as satirical journalist
Early satirical comedies
How anti-Puritan are Middleton's city comedies?
Money and morals in Middleton's city comedies
Middle years: tragi-comedy and moral comedy
City employments
Hard times and Hengist, King of Kent
Political satire: A Game at Chess
City tragedy
Drama and opposition, 1619G++1640
From popular drama to leveller style: a postscript
Middleton's parliamentary Puritan patrons
a note on authorship
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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