Catalogue


The princes of Orange [electronic resource] : the stadholders in the Dutch Republic /
Herbert H. Rowen.
imprint
Cambridge [Cambridgeshire] ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1988.
description
xi, 253 p. : ports. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0521345251
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Cambridge [Cambridgeshire] ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1988.
isbn
0521345251
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
general note
Includes index.
catalogue key
8370899
 
Bibliography: p. [233]-244.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Herbert H. Rowen was for many years Professor of History at Rutgers University. Professor Rowen is a foreign member of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1989-02:
Not a biographical study of the seven Orange-Nassau stadholders but a political history, based on a vast amount of published primary and secondary material, of the Dutch Republic from c. 1550 to 1795. The first stadholder was the famous William of Orange (1533-1584), founder of the Dutch Republic; the last was William V (1748-1806), who was one of the weakest and most ineffective of the seven. As Rowen shows, stadholders were primarily servants of the sovereign provinces and could not pretend to be kings or monarchs. Their primary duty was to execute policy, although, especially in time of crisis, they were expected to provide good leadership. That their presence was not essential to the Dutch Republic became obvious when Holland, the most important and powerful province of the Dutch Republic, had on two occasions no stadholder for many years. The last two stadholders, William IV and William V, lacked the force of character and will power to impose themselves as leaders. Yet, stadholders should not be criticized, as they often have been, for their failure to institute many reforms because their task was not to change the status quo. This work is not easy reading, and might have been more interesting if better biographical descriptions of the seven stadholders had been included. Yet, it is an important contribution to the political history of the Dutch Republic. University libraries. -G. D. Homan, Illinois State University
Reviews
Review Quotes
' ... a skilful outline history which promises to enable the ordinary reader with little previous knowledge of Dutch history to grasp the essence of the political history of one of the more distinctive, dynamic and creative societies of early modern times.' The Times Literary Supplement
' ... a skilful outline history which promises to enable the ordinary reader with little previous knowledge of Dutch history to grasp the essence of the political history of one of the more distinctive, dynamic and creative societies of early modern times.'The Times Literary Supplement
‘ … a skilful outline history which promises to enable the ordinary reader with little previous knowledge of Dutch history to grasp the essence of the political history of one of the more distinctive, dynamic and creative societies of early modern times.’The Times Literary Supplement
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, February 1989
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Summaries
Main Description
This is an account of the Princes of Orange in the Dutch Republic from William I, "the Silent", to William V, the last and saddest, in their roles as "stadholders." It interweaves their personal lives and characters with the development of the unique institution of the stadholderate and the broad political history of the republic. Without attempting to engage in psychohistory, the book treats the mind and personalities of the stadholders as significant factors.
Main Description
This major study provides the first comprehensive assessment of an important European institution, the Stadholderate of the Dutch Republic. Professor Rowen looks at the career of each Prince of Orange in turn, from William I ('The Silent'), to the last and saddest, William V, examining their roles as Stadholder and interweaving their personal lives and characters with the development of the institution. Without engaging in psycho-history, Rowen treats the individual personality of each Stadholder as a significant factor, and shows how the Stadholderate contributed to a distinctive political and constitutional coloration that rendered the United Provinces unique in Europe. The work assesses the contribution of the Stadholderate to the rise and subsequent fall of the Dutch Republic as one of the great powers of early modern Europe, and analyses each prince within his contemporary context, avoiding the highly present-minded approach of many of the Republic's subsequent historians. The Princes of Orange is thus neither a work of hagiography, glorifying the Dutch royal house, nor a piece of destructive iconoclasm, but an authoritative account of a most unusual political, dynastic and diplomatic institution.
Table of Contents
List of illustrationsp. viii
Prefacep. ix
Prologue: lieutenants of the crownp. 1
William I: from courtier to rebelp. 8
Maurice of Nassau: defender of the Republicp. 32
Frederick Henry: firm in moderationp. 56
William II: the challengerp. 77
The first stadholderless period: 1 exclusionp. 95
The first stadholderless period: 2 returnp. 112
William III: stadholder and kingp. 131
The second stadholderless period: doldrumsp. 148
William IV: neither revolutionary nor reformerp. 163
William V: the era of Anna and Brunswickp. 186
William V: the Patriot challengep. 205
Epilogue: consequences and conclusionsp. 230
Bibliographyp. 233
Indexp. 245
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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