Catalogue

COVID-19: Updates on library services and operations.

Poor relief and welfare in Germany from the Reformation to World War I [electronic resource] /
Larry Frohman.
imprint
New York : Cambridge University Press, 2008.
description
x, 257 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0521506034 (hardback), 9780521506038 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
New York : Cambridge University Press, 2008.
isbn
0521506034 (hardback)
9780521506038 (hardback)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8370642
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2009-06-01:
Frohman (SUNY Stony Brook) traces the history of institutional responses to poverty from the 16th to the 20th century. The fact that the book is concerned with such a long period of time is one of its major strengths. Frohman's approach allows him to analyze the long-term origins of the welfare state, instead of viewing it as the product of the 19th and 20th centuries. Frohman rejects earlier interpretations that tend to oversimplify by viewing poor relief as an effort on the part of elites to increase their power over the masses or a bourgeois attempt to impose middle-class values upon society as a whole. Rather, he regards the motives of those overseeing state-sponsored poor relief as consisting of a complex combination of factors. Two major themes run throughout the book. The first is the secularization and resulting bureaucratization of poor relief following the Reformation. The second is the development of a system based upon the needs of the recipient, rather than his or her supposed "worthiness." This fascinating book is marred only by its often-impenetrable academic prose, a shortcoming that renders the book useful only to academics. Summing Up: Recommended. Faculty/researchers. R. W. Lemmons Jacksonville State University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"An ambitious, wide-ranging and intelligent book, successfully combining the history of relief institutions with the history of social theory. There is nothing in English or German that can match it." -E. P. Hennock, University of Liverpool
"...an interesting and well-researched book..." German Studies Review, C . Edmund Clingan, Queensborough Community College, CUNY
"For the first time we have an authoritative general history of the treatment of the poor in Germany between the early modern era and the early twentieth century. Larry Frohman navigates expertly between those 'whiggish' readings of social policy that emphasize improvement, social integration, and the supports needed for productive citizenship and the darker story of social discipline, biopolitics, and the rationalizing drives of governmentality. His book will appeal not just to German historians, but to historians of social policy and social welfare across national fields and to sociologists and social work specialists too." -Geoff Eley, Karl Pohrt Distinguished University Professor of Contemporary History, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
"Frohman's study deepens our understandings of the German welfare state across an impressively long trajectory from the Reformation until the founding of the Weimar Republic. Suggesting a powerful place for poor relief in German solutions to the social question, Frohman offers definitive insights into the history of social citizenship as it emerged in the nineteenth century and as it was transformed by the rise of the nation-state, by liberalism and scientific social reform, and ultimately by the First World War." - Kathleen Canning, University of Michigan
"Frohman traces the history of institutional responses to poverty from the 16th to the 20th century. The fact that the book is concerned with such a long period of time is one of its major strenghts. Recommended." -Choice
"Poor Relief and Welfare in Germany is an exceptionally well-organized narrative that advances relevant arguments illuminating the connections between poor relief, welfare, and modernity across modern Europe and the United States." Canadian Journal of History, Ian Miller, University College of Dublin
"This book is an impressive synthesis. Drawing on archival, published, and secondary sources, Frohman presents a coherent and compelling account of the evolution of poor relief and welfare in Germany in the modern period. Frohman's analysis integrates cultural, institutional, and political history, local and national history, and offers a nuanced, thoughtful, and persuasive perspective on competing interpretive and theoretical frameworks. This book will be obligatory reading and a valuable resource for everyone interested in the history of the welfare state in Central Europe." -Edward Ross Dickinson, University of California at Davis
"This important work provides the first comprehensive history of German social policy from the early modern era until the First World War. A well-organized narrative that surveys all of Germany's many regions shows how charitable and religious approaches to poor relief evolved into Europe's most advanced welfare-state system. The author presents this complex process neither negatively as the repression of the lower classes nor over-optimistically as progress toward perfect social justice, but rather as a flawed but often well-intentioned attempt to integrate the poor into cities, communities, and the national state. This book will certainly become a standard work in its field, and it provides an indispensable basis for future research." -Ann Taylor Allen, University of Louisville
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, June 2009
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This account of poor relief, charity, and social welfare in Germany from the Reformation through World War I integrates historical narrative and theoretical analysis of such issues as social discipline, governmentality, gender, religion, and state-formation.
Description for Bookstore
This book considers poor relief, charity, and social welfare in Germany from the Reformation through World War I, arguing that preventive social welfare programs evolved out of traditional poor relief. Frohman emphasises the role of progressive reformers and local, voluntary initiative in this process.
Description for Bookstore
This book considers poor relief, charity, and social welfare in Germany from the Reformation through World War I, arguing that preventive social welfare programs evolved out of traditional poor relief. Frohman emphasizes the role of progressive reformers and local, voluntary initiative in this process.
Main Description
This account of poor relief, charity, and social welfare in Germany from the Reformation through World War I integrates historical narrative and theoretical analysis of such issues as social discipline, governmentality, gender, religion, and state-formation. It analyses the changing cultural frameworks through which the poor came to be considered as needy; the institutions, strategies, and practices devised to assist, integrate, and discipline these populations; and the political alchemy through which the needs of the individual were reconciled with those of the community. While the Bismarckian social insurance programs have long been regarded as the origin of the German welfare state, this book shows how preventive social welfare programs - the second pillar of the welfare state - evolved out of traditional poor relief, and it emphasises the role of progressive reformers and local, voluntary initiative in this process and the impact of competing reform discourses on both the social domain and the public sphere.
Main Description
This account of poor relief, charity, and social welfare in Germany from the Reformation through World War I integrates historical narrative and theoretical analysis of such issues as social discipline, governmentality, gender, religion, and state-formation. It analyzes the changing cultural frameworks through which the poor came to be considered as needy; the institutions, strategies, and practices devised to assist, integrate, and discipline these populations; and the political alchemy through which the needs of the individual were reconciled with those of the community. While the Bismarckian social insurance programs have long been regarded as the origin of the German welfare state, this book shows how preventive social welfare programs - the second pillar of the welfare state - evolved out of traditional poor relief, and it emphasizes the role of progressive reformers and local, voluntary initiative in this process and the impact of competing reform discourses on both the social domain and the public sphere.
Table of Contents
List of Tables and Figurep. vii
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introductionp. 1
Discipline, Community, and the Sixteenth-Century Origins of Modern Poor Reliefp. 11
The Desacralization of Poverty and the New Discourse on Vagrancyp. 12
Work and the Reorganization of Public Assistancep. 16
Confessional Differences and the Role of Religion in the New Poor Reliefp. 24
The Rise and Fall of the Workhouse: Poor Relief in the Age of Absolutismp. 32
Rethinking the Disciplinary Telosp. 32
The Formation of the Classical Workhousep. 35
Beyond the Workhouse: Industriousness, Education, and the Prevention of Poverty in the Age of Enlightenmentp. 43
Pauperism, Moral Reform, and Visions of Civil Society, 1800-1870p. 53
Voluntary Associations and the Problem of Social Governancep. 53
Pauperism, the Dangerous Classes, and the Social Questionp. 58
Protestant Social Conservatism and the Founding of the Inner Missionp. 64
Mobility, Modernity, and the Liberal Response to the Social Questionp. 71
The State, the Market, and the Organization of Poor Relief, 1830-1870p. 80
Reform Strategies in Prussia and Southern Germanyp. 81
The Elberfeld System and the Formation of a Market Society, 1850-1870p. 87
The Assistantial Double Helix: Poor Relief, Social Insurance, and the Political Economy of Poor Law Reformp. 99
Poor Law Reform by Another Namep. 100
Old Conflicts and New Departuresp. 109
New Voices: Citizenship, Social Reform, and the Origins of Modern Social Work in Imperial Germanyp. 112
The Inner Mission, 1870-1914p. 115
The Bourgeois Women's Movement, the Spiritualization of Motherhood, and Social Work as Social Reconciliationp. 116
The Caritas Association and the Reluctant Modernization of Catholic Charityp. 133
Social Democracy: The Demonization of the Capitalist System and Pragmatic Cooperation at the Local Levelp. 138
The Social Perspective on Poverty and the Origins of Modern Social Welfarep. 141
The Social Perspective on Poverty and the Logic of Social Citizenshipp. 141
Familial Subjects - The Archimedean Point of Social Reformp. 152
From Fault to Risk: Changing Strategies of Assistance to the Jobless in Imperial Germanyp. 158
Migrant Relief, Workhouses, and the Policing of the Residuump. 160
From the Margins to the Center: The War on Labor Market Riskp. 172
Youth Welfare and the Political Alchemy of Juvenile Justicep. 179
Guardianship and the Public Interest in the Private Familyp. 180
Juvenile Delinquency and the Socialization of Juvenile Justicep. 183
The Social Evolution of Poor Relief, the Crisis of Voluntarism, and the Limits of Progressive Social Reformp. 196
Family, Welfare, and (Dis)order on the Home Frontp. 206
Total War and the Transformation of Social Politicsp. 206
Female Dependence, Female Citizenship, and the Wartime Challenge to Deterrent Poor Reliefp. 210
Kriegerfrauen and the Politics of National Obligationp. 220
Motherhood, Work, and the Grounds of Citizenshipp. 224
Disabled Veterans and the Contradictions of Therapeutic Welfarep. 230
Wartime Youth Welfare and the Progressive Refiguring of the Social Contractp. 233
From Prevention to Promotion: Rethinking the Political Rationality of Social Assistancep. 233
State, Society, and the Corporatist Turn in the Social Sectorp. 238
Conclusion: The End of Poor Relief and the Invention of Welfarep. 243
Sources and Abbreviationsp. 249
Indexp. 251
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem