Catalogue

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The politics of national celebrations in the Arab Middle East [electronic resource] /
Elie Podeh.
imprint
New York : Cambridge University Press, 2011.
description
xiii, 338 p. ; ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
1107001080 (hardback), 9781107001084 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
More Details
author
imprint
New York : Cambridge University Press, 2011.
isbn
1107001080 (hardback)
9781107001084 (hardback)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Celebrating nation and state : a theoretical framework -- Celebrations and ceremonies in Arab-Islamic lands -- Egypt : changes within continuity -- Iraq : changing regimes, changing celebrations -- Jordan : preserving invented traditions -- Lebanon : upholding the integrity of the state -- Saudi Arabia : between religious and secular holidays.
abstract
"Why do countries celebrate defining religious moments or significant events in their history, and how and why do their leaders select certain events for commemoration and not others? This book is the first systematic study of the role of celebrations and public holidays in the Arab Middle East from the fall of the Ottoman Empire to the present. By tracing the history of the modern nation-state through successive generations, the book shows how Arab rulers have used public holidays as a means of establishing their legitimacy and, more broadly, a sense of national identity. Most recently, some states have attempted to nationalize religious festivals in the face of the Islamic revival. With its many illustrations and copious examples from across the region, the book offers an alternative perspective on the history and politics of the Middle East"--Provided by publisher.
catalogue key
8370559
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
ELIE PODEH is Professor of Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. His publications include Britain and the Middle East, co-edited with Zach Levey (2008); Arab-Jewish Relations from Conflict to Resolution?, co-edited with Asher Kaufmann (2005); Rethinking Nasserism: Revolution and Historical Memory in Modem Egypt, co-edited with Onn Winckler (2004); and The Arab-Israeli Conflict in Israeli History Textbooks, 1948-2000 (2002).
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2012-02-01:
This comprehensive, thoroughly researched study focuses on the historical transformation of national state celebrations in five Arab countries: Egypt, Iraq, Lebanon, Jordan, and Saudi Arabia. As the author (Hebrew Univ., Israel) writes, "this book explores the roles of national state celebrations in the Arab world" through an analysis of "the reasons rulers and elites invest great efforts in inventing holidays and manufacturing grandiose celebrations." Chapter one sets the theoretical framework. An analysis of the five case studies follows, with empirical data gathered from Arabic sources including TV programs and newspapers. As the book demonstrates, Arab rulers and elites, just like their counterparts in other regions of the world, initiate and support national celebrations and commemoratives for a number of reasons. Chief among them is to create and consolidate national identity, and to acquire and reinforce legitimacy; in cases where the polity may be under threat, these communal celebrations will act to reignite patriotic sentiments and help to preserve the integrity of the body politic. This original work is a valuable contribution to understanding the cultural history of the Middle East. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All academic levels/libraries. A. Rassam emerita, CUNY Queens College
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, February 2012
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This is a study of the role of celebrations and public holidays in the Arab Middle East. By tracing this history through successive generations, the author shows how Arab rulers have used public holidays as a means of establishing their legitimacy and a sense of national identity.
Description for Bookstore
This book is the first systematic study of the role of celebrations and public holidays in the Arab Middle East. By tracing this history through successive generations, the author shows how Arab rulers have used public holidays as a means of establishing their legitimacy and a sense of national identity.
Description for Bookstore
This book is the first systematic study of the role of celebrations and public holidays in the Arab Middle East from the fall of the Ottoman Empire to the present. By tracing the history of the modern nation-state through successive generations, the author shows how Arab rulers have used public holidays as a means of establishing their legitimacy and a sense of national identity. Most recently, some states have attempted to nationalize religious festivals in the face of the Islamic revival. With many illustrations and examples from across the region, the book offers an alternative perspective on the history and politics of the Middle East.
Library of Congress Summary
"Why do countries celebrate defining religious moments or significant events in their history, and how and why do their leaders select certain events for commemoration and not others? This book is the first systematic study of the role of celebrations and public holidays in the Arab Middle East from the fall of the Ottoman Empire to the present. By tracing the history of the modern nation-state through successive generations, the book shows how Arab rulers have used public holidays as a means of establishing their legitimacy and, more broadly, a sense of national identity. Most recently, some states have attempted to nationalize religious festivals in the face of the Islamic revival. With its many illustrations and copious examples from across the region, the book offers an alternative perspective on the history and politics of the Middle East"--
Table of Contents
List of Figuresp. viii
Prefacep. xi
Introductionp. 1
Celebrating Nation and State: A Theoretical Frameworkp. 9
Celebrations and Ceremonies in Arab-Islamic Landsp. 34
Egypt: Changes within Continuityp. 55
Iraq: Changing Regimes, Changing Celebrationsp. 108
Jordan: Preserving Invented Traditionsp. 168
Lebanon: Upholding the Integrity of the Statep. 207
Saudi Arabia: Between Religious and Secular Holidaysp. 255
Conclusionsp. 285
Bibliographyp. 305
Indexp. 327
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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