Catalogue


The politics of gender in Victorian Britain [electronic resource] : masculinity, political culture, and the struggle for women's rights /
Ben Griffin.
imprint
Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2012.
description
xii, 352 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
1107015073, 9781107015074
format(s)
Book
More Details
author
imprint
Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2012.
isbn
1107015073
9781107015074
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Machine generated contents note: Part I. Introduction: 1. 'Feminism' and the history of women's rights; Part II. Masculinity and the Struggle for Women's Rights: 2. The domestic ideology of Victorian patriarchy; 3. Class, liberalism and the erosion of Victorian domestic ideology; 4. Religious change and the transformation of domestic ideology; 5. The politics of paternity; 6. Performing masculinities in the House of Commons; Part III. Political Culture and the Struggle for Women's Rights: 7. Classes, interests and parliamentary reform; 8. The instability of the 1867 settlement, the secret ballot, and women's suffrage; 9. Redefining 'fitness': from the educated voter to household suffrage; 10. The road to democracy, 1885-1906; 11. Fin de si├Ęcle.
abstract
"This groundbreaking history of Victorian politics, feminism and parliamentary reform challenges traditional assumptions about the development of British democracy and the struggle for women's rights and demonstrates how political activity has been shaped by changes in the history of masculinity. From the second half of the nineteenth century Britain's all-male parliament began to transform the legal position of women as it reformed laws that had upheld male authority for centuries. To explain these revolutionary changes, Ben Griffin looks beyond the actions of the women's movement alone and shows how the behaviour and ideologies of male politicians were fundamentally shaped by their gender. He argues that changes to women's rights were not simply the result of changing ideas about women but also changing beliefs about masculinity, religion and the nature of the constitution and, in doing so, demonstrates how gender inequality can be created and reproduced by the state"--
catalogue key
8370551
 
Includes bibliographical references (p.323-329) and index.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Description for Bookstore
This groundbreaking history of Victorian politics, feminism and parliamentary reform challenges traditional assumptions about the development of British democracy and the struggle for women's rights. It shows how political activity was shaped by changing beliefs about masculinity and demonstrates how gender inequality can be created and reproduced by the state.
Main Description
This groundbreaking history of Victorian politics, feminism and parliamentary reform challenges traditional assumptions about the development of British democracy and the struggle for women's rights and demonstrates how political activity has been shaped by changes in the history of masculinity. From the second half of the nineteenth century Britain's all-male parliament began to transform the legal position of women as it reformed laws that had upheld male authority for centuries. To explain these revolutionary changes, Ben Griffin looks beyond the actions of the women's movement alone and shows how the behaviour and ideologies of male politicians were fundamentally shaped by their gender. He argues that changes to women's rights were not simply the result of changing ideas about women but also changing beliefs about masculinity, religion and the nature of the constitution and, in doing so, demonstrates how gender inequality can be created and reproduced by the state.

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