Catalogue

COVID-19: Updates on library services and operations.

One god [electronic resource] : pagan monotheism in the Roman Empire /
edited by Stephen Mitchell and Peter van Nuffelen.
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2010.
description
ix, 239 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0521194164 (hbk.), 9780521194167 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2010.
isbn
0521194164 (hbk.)
9780521194167 (hbk.)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Machine generated contents note: 1. Introduction: the debate about pagan monotheism S. Mitchell and P. Van Nuffelen; 2. Pagan monotheism as a religious phenomenon P. Van Nuffelen; 3. Pagan ritual and monotheism J. North; 4. The case for pagan monotheism in Greek and Graeco-Roman antiquity M. Frede; 5. Monotheism between cult and politics. The themes of the ancient debate between pagan and Christian monotheism A. Fürst; 6. The price of monotheism. Some new observations on a current debate about late antiquity C. Markschies; 7. Megatheism: the search for the almighty god and the competition of cults A. Chaniotis; 8. Deus deum ... summorum maximus (Apuleius). Ritual expressions of distinction in the divine world in the imperial period N. Belayche; 9. Further thoughts on the cult of Theos Hypsistos S. Mitchell.
general note
Conference proceedings.
abstract
"Graeco-Roman religion in its classic form was polytheistic; on the other hand, monotheistic ideas enjoyed wide currency in ancient philosophy. This contradiction provides a challenge for our understanding of ancient pagan religion. Certain forms of cult activity, including acclamations of 'one god' and the worship of Theos Hypsistos, the highest god, have sometimes been interpreted as evidence for pagan monotheism. This book discusses pagan monotheism in its philosophical and intellectual context, traces the evolution of new religious ideas in the time of the Roman empire, and evaluates the usefulness of the term 'monotheism' as a way of understanding these developments in later antiquity outside the context of Judaism and Christianity. In doing so, it establishes a new framework for understanding the relationship between polytheistic and monotheistic religious cultures between the first and fourth centuries ad"--Provided by publisher.
catalogue key
8369554
 
Includes bibliographical references and indexes.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
'Whether or not one finds the term pagan monotheism useful, and I do, this volume is ... extraordinarily effective in conveying the continuities between paganism, ancient Judaism and Christianity.' Bryn Mawr Classical Review
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Description for Bookstore
Graeco-Roman religion in its classic form was polytheistic, but monotheistic ideas enjoyed wide currency in ancient philosophy. This 2010 book establishes a new framework for understanding the relationship between polytheistic and monotheistic religious cultures between the first and fourth centuries AD.
Description for Bookstore
Graeco-Roman religion in its classic form was polytheistic, but monotheistic ideas enjoyed wide currency in ancient philosophy. This book establishes a new framework for understanding the relationship between polytheistic and monotheistic religious cultures between the first and fourth centuries AD.
Main Description
Graeco-Roman religion in its classic form was polytheistic; on the other hand, monotheistic ideas enjoyed wide currency in ancient philosophy. This contradiction provides a challenge for our understanding of ancient pagan religion. Certain forms of cult activity, including acclamations of 'one god' and the worship of theos hypsistos, the highest god, have sometimes been interpreted as evidence for pagan monotheism. This 2010 book discusses pagan monotheism in its philosophical and intellectual context, traces the evolution of new religious ideas in the time of the Roman empire, and evaluates the usefulness of the term 'monotheism' as a way of understanding these developments in later antiquity outside the context of Judaism and Christianity. In doing so, it establishes a framework for understanding the relationship between polytheistic and monotheistic religious cultures between the first and fourth centuries AD.
Main Description
Graeco-Roman religion in its classic form was polytheistic; on the other hand, monotheistic ideas enjoyed wide currency in ancient philosophy. This contradiction provides a challenge for our understanding of ancient pagan religion. Certain forms of cult activity, including acclamations of 'one god' and the worship of theos hypsistos, the highest god, have sometimes been interpreted as evidence for pagan monotheism. This book discusses pagan monotheism in its philosophical and intellectual context, traces the evolution of new religious ideas in the time of the Roman empire, and evaluates the usefulness of the term 'monotheism' as a way of understanding these developments in later antiquity outside the context of Judaism and Christianity. In doing so, it establishes a framework for understanding the relationship between polytheistic and monotheistic religious cultures between the first and fourth centuries AD.
Main Description
Graeco-Roman religion in its classic form was polytheistic; on the other hand, monotheistic ideas enjoyed wide currency in ancient philosophy. This contradiction provides a challenge for our understanding of ancient pagan religion. Certain forms of cult activity, including acclamations of 'one god' and the worship of theos hypsistos, the highest god, have sometimes been interpreted as evidence for pagan monotheism. This book discusses pagan monotheism in its philosophical and intellectual context, traces the evolution of new religious ideas in the time of the Roman empire, and evaluates the usefulness of the term 'monotheism' as a way of understanding these developments in later antiquity outside the context of Judaism and Christianity. In doing so, it establishes a new framework for understanding the relationship between polytheistic and monotheistic religious cultures between the first and fourth centuries AD.
Table of Contents
Preface and acknowledgementsp. vii
List of abbreviationsp. ix
Introduction: the debate about pagan monotheismp. 1
Pagan monotheism as a religious phenomenonp. 16
Pagan ritual and monotheismp. 34
The case for pagan monotheism in Greek and Graeco-Roman antiquityp. 53
Monotheism between cult and politics: the themes of the ancient debate between pagan and Christian monotheismp. 82
The price of monotheism: some new observations on a current debate about late antiquityp. 100
Megatheism: the search for the almighty god and the competition of cultsp. 112
Deus deum... summorum maximus (Apuleius): ritual expressions of distinction in the divine world in the imperial periodp. 141
Further thoughts on the cult of Theos Hypsistosp. 167
Bibliographyp. 209
General indexp. 231
Index of authors, works and citationsp. 233
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem