Catalogue


Nietzsche's dangerous game [electronic resource] : philosophy in the twilight of the idols /
Daniel W. Conway.
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1997.
description
xii, 267 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0521573718 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
Subjects
More Details
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1997.
isbn
0521573718 (hardback)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8368074
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Daniel W. Conway has written an important book that warrants sreious attention from both Nietzsche scholars and the broader scholarly community interested in Nietzsche's critique of modernity." Aln D. Schrift, Philosophy in Review
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Summaries
Description for Bookstore
This is the first book-length treatment of the unique nature and development of Nietzsche's post-Zarathustran political philosophy. Daniel Conway has written a powerful book about Nietzsche's own appreciation of the limitations of both his writing style and of his famous prophetic 'stance'.
Bowker Data Service Summary
The same critique of modernity that Nietzsche levelled against modernity is turned on him as Conway shows Nietzsche suffering the same decadence and complicity that he himself deplored and dissected in his post-Zarathustran political philosophy.
Description for Library
This is the first book-length treatment of the unique nature and development of Nietzsche's post-Zarathustran political philosophy. This later political philosophy is set in the context of the critique of modernity that Nietzsche advances in the years 1885-1888, in such texts as Beyond Good and Evil, On the Genealogy of Morals, Twilight of the Idols, The Antichrist, The Case of Wagner, and Ecce Homo. Daniel Conway has written a powerful book about Nietzsche's own appreciation of the limitations of both his writing style and of his famous prophetic 'stance'.
Main Description
This is the first book-length treatment of the unique nature and development of Nietzsche's post-Zarathustran political philosophy. This later political philosophy is set in the context of the critique of modernity that Nietzsche advances in the years 18851888, in such texts as Beyond Good and Evil, On the Genealogy of Morals, Twilight of the Idols, The Antichrist, The Case of Wagner, and Ecce Homo. In this light Nietzsche's own diagnosis of the ills of modernity is subject to the same criticism that he himself levelled against previous philosophies; that it is an involuntary symptom of the age it represents. Nietzsche is seen to be aware of his own decadence and of his complicity with the very tendencies that he dissects and deplores. By relating the political philosophy, the critique of modernity and the theory of decadence Daniel Conway has written a powerful book about Nietzsche's own appreciation of the limitations of both his writing style and of his famous prophetic 'stance'.
Main Description
This is the first book-length treatment of the unique nature and development of Nietzsche’s post-Zarathustran political philosophy. This later political philosophy is set in the context of the critique of modernity that Nietzsche advances in the years 1885–1888, in such texts as Beyond Good and Evil, On the Genealogy of Morals, Twilight of the Idols, The Antichrist, The Case of Wagner, and Ecce Homo. In this light Nietzsche’s own diagnosis of the ills of modernity is subject to the same criticism that he himself levelled against previous philosophies; that it is an involuntary symptom of the age it represents. Nietzsche is seen to be aware of his own decadence and of his complicity with the very tendencies that he dissects and deplores. By relating the political philosophy, the critique of modernity and the theory of decadence Daniel Conway has written a powerful book about Nietzsche’s own appreciation of the limitations of both his writing style and of his famous prophetic ‘stance’.
Table of Contents
Reading the signs of the times: Nietzsche contra Nietzsche
The economy of decadence
Peoples and ages: The mortal soul writ large
Et tu, Nietzsche?
Parastrategesis
Skirmishes of an untimely man: Nietzsche's revaluation of all values
Standing between two millenia: intimations of the antichrist
Conclusion: Odysseus bound?
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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