Catalogue

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The national integration of Italian return migration, 1870-1929 [electronic resource] /
Dino Cinel.
imprint
Cambridge [England] ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1991.
description
vi, 280 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0521400589 (hard)
format(s)
Book
More Details
author
imprint
Cambridge [England] ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1991.
isbn
0521400589 (hard)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8367803
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 235-272) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1992-09:
Over a period of 60 years, from the completion of the risorgimento until the beginning of the Great Depression, millions of Italians left their country to start new lives abroad. Nearly half of those who left Italy, as Cinel shows in this wonderfully lucid and scholarly study, later came back. They were certainly welcomed, especially those who returned to Southern Italy with savings acquired in the US. Contemporary observors thought American capital would encourage economic growth and modernization in the Mezzogiorno. It fact it did not the savings of the return migrants helped to inflate land prices, but they scarcely brought transformation to the backward agrarian economy of the south. As Cinel notes, it still remains very much an open question whether the wealth acquired from abroad by migrants can do much for marginal economy. But the best parts of this work are those that deal with the culture of the Italian migrants themselves. Whether they returned to their native villages or stayed abroad, they remained sons and daughters of the Italian South individualistic, loyal to their familes, and intensely distrustful of government. College, univeristy and public libraries. S. Bailey; Knox College
Reviews
Review Quotes
"...an interesting and insightful study of Italian emigration and return migration in the late nineteenth century." American Historical Review
"This book does well to raise so many questions that continue to need answering, and the role of regional differences is a fascinationg one." Journal of American Ethnic History
"Where Cinel's book is most successful is in assembling the most exhaustive documentation yet available on the economic prospects awaiting southern returnees and on the extent to which their savings (ranging from modest to substantial), besides translating into improved working and living conditions, could ignite an economic takeoff in the South. Particularly praiseworthy is the author's decision to break down the data at a regional level, thus making readers more aware of the socio-economic diversity existing in the Italian South." Bruno Ramirez, Journal of American History
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, September 1992
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Description for Bookstore
This book examines return migration to Italy from the United States from 1870 to 1929. Many imigrants went to the United States to make money to buy land in Italy, and the Italian government came to see this as the best way of promoting economic modernization at home.
Description for Library
This book examines return migration to Italy from the United States from 1870 to 1929. Many imigrants did not intend to settle permanently in the United States, but to make money in order to buy land in Italy. The Italian government came to see this as the best way of creating savings, which would in turn promote the modernization at home, especially in the south. Eventually, return migration and remittances were regarded by many Italians as the best way to solve the thorny southern question.
Main Description
This book examines return migration to Italy from the United States from 1870 to 1929. Many imigrants did not intend to settle permanently in the United States, but to make money in order to buy land in Italy. The book documents the flow from America back to Italy of individuals and remittances and discusses the strategies used by returnees in investing American savings. The Italian government and Italian society in general took a great deal of interest in return migration. Initially, Italy opposed mass emigration. In time, the government promoted emigration and return migration as the best way of creating savings, which would in turn promote the modernization of the Italian economy, especially in the south. Eventually, return migration and remittances were regarded by many Italians as the best way to solve the thorny southern question.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgments
Introduction: emigration and the process of national integration
The difficult task of national integration
A blueprint for change
The southern ethos
The national debate
Return migration
American remittances
Investing American savings
regional differences
Return and retirement
Conclusion: national integration and return migration
Notes
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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