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Medieval listening and reading [electronic resource] : the primary reception of German literature, 800-1300 /
D.H. Green.
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1994.
description
xv, 483 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0521444934 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1994.
isbn
0521444934 (hardback)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8367099
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 427-476) and indexes.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1995-03:
Long accustomed to providing seminal analyses on medieval German literature, Green has again enriched the discipline with the present masterful study. Proceeding from the premise that exclusive concentration on orality or reading does not adequately represent medieval modes of reception, Green proposes the inclusion of the interplay of the spoken and written, i.e., a mixed form that could include reading aloud, recitation, dictation, etc. Two chapters dealing with previous scholarship on orality and literacy as well as the inception of writing in Carolingian Germany serve as an introduction. The next six chapters consider the three modes of reception with great subtlety. In this section of his investigation Green utilizes evidence gained from a scrutiny of an impressively broad spectrum of medieval German works, both literary and nonliterary. The concluding two chapters discuss the greater implications of the interpenetration and coexistence of orality and literacy during the Middle Ages. The book closes with an appendix dealing with the Middle High German term lesen, a substantial note section, an exhaustive bibliography of primary and secondary sources, and an index of names. Graduate; faculty. F. G. Gentry; Pennsylvania State University, University Park Campus
Reviews
Review Quotes
'Admirable ... a very complex, well-researched and absorbing book ... highly recommended.' Icarus
'Admirable ... a very complex, well-researched and absorbing book ... highly recommended.'Icarus
‘Admirable … a very complex, well-researched and absorbing book … highly recommended.’Icarus
"Green's book will be useful to scholars, college instructors, and graduate students not conversant in modern German who seek an informed discussion of questions and sources central to orality and literacy in the German Middle Ages." Speculum
"Long accustomed to providing seminal analyses on medieval German literature, Green has again enriched the discipline with the present masterful study." F. G. Gentry, Choice
"This book is important for what it reveals about literature in German from 800 to 1300; it is of value, too, for the techniques of analysis that it employs. Even during my first reading, I was thinking how some of Green's methods could be modified to fit Old and Middle English literature. I am not the only reader who will be so animated." Modern Philology
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, March 1995
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Description for Bookstore
This book deals with the first five hundred years of German literature (800-1300) and how it was received by contemporaries. Covering the whole spectrum of genres, from dance-songs to liturgy to drama, it explores which works were meant to be recited to listeners, which were destined for the individual reader (however rare), and which anticipated a twofold reception.
Description for Bookstore
This book deals with the first five hundred years of German literature (800–1300) and how it was received by contemporaries. Covering the whole spectrum of genres, from dance-songs to liturgy to drama, it explores which works were meant to be recited to listeners, which were destined for the individual reader (however rare), and which anticipated a twofold reception.
Description for Library
This book deals with the first five hundred years of German literature (800-1300) and how it was received by contemporaries. Covering the whole spectrum of genres, from dance-songs to liturgy to drama, it explores which works were meant to be recited to listeners, which were destined for the individual reader (however rare), and which anticipated a twofold reception. It emphasises this third possibility, seeing it as an example of the bicultural world of the Middle Ages, combining orality with writing, illiteracy with literacy, vernacular with Latin, lay with clerical.
Main Description
This book deals with the first 500 years of German literature (800-1300) and how it was received by contemporaries. Covering the whole spectrum of genres, from dance-songs to liturgy, heroic epics to drama, it explores which works were meant to be recited to listeners, which were destined for the individual reader, and which anticipated a twofold reception. It emphasizes this third possibility, seeing it as an example of the bicultural world of the Middle Ages, combining orality with writing, illiteracy with literacy, vernacular with Latin, lay with clerical.
Main Description
This new study brings recent scholarly debates on oral cultures and literate societies to bear on the earliest recorded literature in German (800-1300). It considers the criteria for assessing what works were destined for listeners, what examples anticipated readers, and how far both modes of reception could apply to one work. The opening chapters review previous scholarship, and the introduction of writing into preliterate Germany. The core of the book presents lexical and non-lexical evidence for the different modes of reception, taken from the whole spectrum of genres, from dance songs to liturgy, from drama and heroic literature to the court narrative and lyric poetry. The social contexts of reception and the physical process of reading books are also considered. Two concluding chapters explore the literary and historical implications of the slow interpenetration of orality and literacy.
Table of Contents
Preliminary Problems
Orality and writing
The historical background
Three Modes of Reception
Criteria for reception by hearing
Survey of reception by hearing
Criteria for reception by reading
Survey of reception by reading
Criteria for the intermediate mode of reception
Survey of the intermediate mode of reception
Conclusions
Literacy, history and fiction
Recital and reading in their historical context
Notes
Bibliographic index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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