Catalogue


Masculinity, gender and identity in the English Renaissance lyric [electronic resource] /
Catherine Bates.
imprint
Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2007.
description
viii, 263 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
9780521882873
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2007.
isbn
9780521882873
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8366932
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
In this book, Catherine Bates presents a radical new reading of representations of gender in Shakespeare, Spenser, Sidney and Donne.
Description for Bookstore
Catherine Bates uncovers radically alternative models of masculinity in the lyric tradition of the Renaissance. She develops critical strategies that make it possible to understand and appreciate what is genuinely revolutionary about these texts and about the English Renaissance lyric tradition at large.
Main Description
A radical reading of representations of gender in Shakespeare, Ralegh, Sidney and Donne.
Main Description
In early modern lyric poetry, the male poet or lover often appears not as powerful and masterly but rather as broken, abject, and feminine. Catherine Bates examines the cultural and literary strategies behind this representation and uncovers radically alternative models of masculinity in the lyric tradition of the Renaissance. Focusing on Sidney, Ralegh, Shakespeare, and Donne, she offers astute readings of a wide range of texts - a sonnet sequence, a blazon, an elegy, a complaint, and an epistle. She shows how existing critical approaches have too much invested in the figure of the authoritative male writer to be able to do justice to the truly radical nature of these alternative masculinities. Taking direction from psychoanalytic theories of gender formation, Bates develops critical strategies that make it possible to understand and appreciate what is genuinely revolutionary about these texts and about the English Renaissance lyric tradition at large.
Table of Contents
Introduction
Masochism in Astrophil and Stella
Fort! Da! The phallus in 'What tongue can her perfections tell?'
Abjection and melancholia in The Ocean to Cynthia
Feminine identifications in A Lover's Complaint
The lesbian phallus in Sapho to Philaenis
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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