Catalogue


Marriage gifts and social change in ancient Palestine, 1200 BCE to 200 CE [electronic resource] /
T.M. Lemos.
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2010.
description
xii, 296 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0521113490 (hbk.), 9780521113496 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2010.
isbn
0521113490 (hbk.)
9780521113496 (hbk.)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8366912
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 247-273) and indexes.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"This study will have lasting value for not only its conclusions but also the model of interdisciplinary study that it provides. It is of major importance both for its conclusions and for its model of interdisciplinary methodology. The book is well written and will stimulate thinking about the subject at hand. It is both instructive and persuasive. Undoubtedly, it will spark further research into the social world of the family in ancient Israel and the economics of marriage, as well as a better understanding of the correlation between bridewealth and dowry societies and incidences of monogamy, polygyny, and women's social status. -- Biblical Interpretation Naomi Steinberg, DePaul University
'This Yale doctoral dissertation is noteworthy for its use of anthropological theory' International Review of Biblical Studies
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
T. M. Lemos traces changes in the marriage customs of ancient Palestine over the course of several hundred years. The most important of these changes was a shift in emphasis from bridewealth to dowry, the latter of which clearly predominated in the Hellenistic and Roman periods. Whereas previous scholarship has often attributed these shifts to the influence of foreign groups, Lemos connects them instead with a transformation that occurred in Palestine's social structure during the very same period. In the early Iron Age, Israel was a kinship-based society with a subsistence economy, but as the centuries passed, it became increasingly complex and developed marked divisions between rich and poor. At the same time, the importance of its kinship groups waned greatly. Utilizing an interdisciplinary approach that draws heavily on anthropological research, cultural theory, archaeological evidence, and historical-critical methods, Lemos posits that shifts in marriage customs were directly related to these wider social changes.
Description for Bookstore
T. M. Lemos traces changes in the marriage customs of ancient Palestine over the course of several hundred years. Utilizing an interdisciplinary approach that draws heavily on anthropological research, cultural theory, archaeological evidence, and historical-critical methods, Lemos posits that shifts in marriage customs were directly related to wider social changes.
Main Description
In Marriage Gifts and Social Change in Ancient Palestine, T. M. Lemos traces changes in the marriage customs of ancient Palestine over the course of several hundred years. The most important of these changes was a shift in emphasis from bridewealth to dowry, the latter of which clearly predominated in the Hellenistic and Roman periods. Whereas previous scholarship has often attributed these shifts to the influence of foreign groups, Lemos connects them instead with a transformation that occurred in Palestine's social structure during the very same period. In the early Iron Age, Israel was a kinship-based society with a subsistence economy, but as the centuries passed, it became increasingly complex and developed marked divisions between rich and poor. At the same time, the importance of its kinship groups waned greatly. Utilizing an interdisciplinary approach that draws heavily on anthropological research, cultural theory, archaeological evidence, and historical-critical methods, Lemos posits that shifts in marriage customs were directly related to these wider social changes.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Abbreviationsp. xi
Introductionp. 1
Biblical Evidence for Marriage Giftsp. 20
Postexilic Evidence for Marriage Giftsp. 62
Anthropology and the Study of Marriage Giftsp. 89
The Social Structure of Ancient Israel from Iron I to the Babylonian Exilep. 159
The Social Structure of Palestine in the Second Temple Periodp. 200
Final Analysis and Conclusionsp. 230
Appendix: Marriage Gifts Among Judeans Living in Babylonia During the Sixth Century BCEp. 237
Glossaryp. 245
Bibliographyp. 247
Index of Biblical and Other Ancient Sourcesp. 275
General Indexp. 283
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem