Catalogue


Kant on beauty and biology [electronic resource] : an interpretation of the Critique of judgment /
Rachel Zuckert.
imprint
Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2007.
description
xiii, 409 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0521865891 (hbk), 9780521865890 (hbk)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2007.
isbn
0521865891 (hbk)
9780521865890 (hbk)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8365771
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 388-395) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
'... impressive in its intellectual scope, its clearly-written quality, its well-informed, considerable citation of the secondary literature in Kant scholarship and its manner of arguing for a variety of nuanced positions that arise within the text's many subthemes. It is a contribution that stands solidly on the shoulders of the presently leading Kant scholarship and that integrates itself well into it.'
Review of the hardback: '... impressive in its intellectual scope, its clearly-written quality, its well-informed, considerable citation of the secondary literature in Kant scholarship and its manner of arguing for a variety of nuanced positions that arise within the text's many subthemes. It is a contribution that stands solidly on the shoulders of the presently leading Kant scholarship and that integrates itself well into it.' British Journal for the History of Philosophy
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Kant's 'Critique of Judgement' has often been interpreted by scholars as comprising of separate treatments of three uneasily connected topics: beauty, biology, and empirical knowledge. This text interprets the Critique as a unified argument concerning all three domains.
Main Description
Kant's Critique of Judgment has often been interpreted by scholars as comprising separate treatments of three uneasily connected topics: beauty, biology, and empirical knowledge. Rachel Zuckert's book is the first to interpret the Critique as a unified argument concerning all three domains. She argues that on Kant's view, human beings demonstrate a distinctive cognitive ability in appreciating beauty and understanding organic life: an ability to anticipate a whole that we do not completely understand according to preconceived categories. This ability is necessary, moreover, for human beings to gain knowledge of nature in its empirical character as it is, not as we might assume it to be. Her wide-ranging and original study will be valuable for readers in all areas of Kant's philosophy.
Main Description
Kant's Critique of Judgment has often been interpreted by scholars as comprising separate treatments of three uneasily connected topics: beauty, biology, and empirical knowledge. Rachel Zuckert's book interprets the Critique as a unified argument concerning all three domains. She argues that on Kant's view, human beings demonstrate a distinctive cognitive ability in appreciating beauty and understanding organic life: an ability to anticipate a whole that we do not completely understand according to preconceived categories. This ability is necessary, moreover, for human beings to gain knowledge of nature in its empirical character as it is, not as we might assume it to be. Her wide-ranging and original study will be valuable for readers in all areas of Kant's philosophy.
Description for Bookstore
Kant's Critique of Judgment has often been interpreted by scholars as comprising separate treatments of three uneasily connected topics: beauty, biology, and empirical knowledge. Rachel Zuckert's book interprets the Critique as a unified argument concerning all three domains.
Description for Bookstore
Kant's Critique of Judgment has often been interpreted by scholars as comprising separate treatments of three uneasily connected topics: beauty, biology, and empirical knowledge. Rachel Zuckert's book is the first to interpret the Critique as a unified argument concerning all three domains.
Long Description
Kant?'s Critique of Judgment has often been interpreted by scholars as comprising separate treatments of three uneasily connected topics: beauty, biology, and empirical knowledge. Rachel Zuckert?'s book is the first to interpret the Critique as a unified argument concerning all three domains. She argues that on Kant?'s view, human beings demonstrate a distinctive cognitive ability in appreciating beauty and understanding organic life: an ability to anticipate a whole that we do not completely understand according to preconceived categories. This ability is necessary, moreover, for human beings to gain knowledge of nature in its empirical character as it is, not as we might assume it to be. Her wide-ranging and original study will be valuable for readers in all areas of Kant?'s philosophy.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Note on citationp. xiii
Introductionp. 1
The problem: The unity of the diversep. 23
Reflective judgment and its principle: Preliminary remarksp. 64
Teleological judgmentp. 87
The analytic of teleological judgment: Purposive unity is the "highest formal unity"p. 89
A merely subjective principle: Time and the "peculiarities" of our intellectsp. 130
Aesthetic judgmentp. 171
Introduction to Part IIp. 173
Beautiful objects: Subjectively purposive formp. 181
Aesthetic pleasure: The feeling of subjective, projective temporalityp. 231
The free harmony of the faculties: Purposiveness as the principle of aesthetic Beurteilungp. 279
The justification of aesthetic judgment: Purposiveness as the principle of reflective judgingp. 321
Conclusionp. 36
Bibliography of works citedp. 388
Indexp. 396
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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