Catalogue

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The Jewish press and the Holocaust, 1939-1945 [electronic resource] : Palestine, Britain, the United States, and the Soviet Union /
Yosef Gorny ; translated by Naftali Greenwood.
imprint
New York : Cambridge University Press, 2012.
description
x, 284 p. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
1107011310 (hardback), 9781107011311 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
More Details
author
imprint
New York : Cambridge University Press, 2012.
isbn
1107011310 (hardback)
9781107011311 (hardback)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Introduction: The transnational community -- I. From concern to outcry 1939-1942. Chapt. I. The Hebrew-language press in Palestine (Davar, Hatzofe, Ha'aretz, Haboqer, Hamashqif) -- Chapt. 2. Sounding the alarm: the American Jewish press, 1939-1942 -- II. The illusion dashed 1942-1945 -- Chapt. 3. The Hebrew-language press in Palestine -- Chapt. 4. The American Jewish press -- Chapt. 5. The British Jewish press, 1939-1945 -- Chapt. 6. The brief days of Jewish national unity: Aynikayt, 1942-1945 -- III. The individual confronts the horror -- Chapt. 7. Itzhak Gruenbaum: the main defendant -- Chapt. 8. The optimism that deludes the intellectuals -- Chapt. 9. Between Lidice and Majdanek -- Chapt. 10. Remarks on the continuing Jewish angst -- Chapt. 11. Conclusion.
catalogue key
8365647
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2012-06-01:
Drawing on his facility in Hebrew, Yiddish, and English, emeritus Tel Aviv University historian Gorni carefully analyzes how the Jewish press in four countries responded to the unfolding of the Holocaust. The press underscored the political weakness of Jews worldwide, often pointing to the lack of a Jewish nation. No matter their ideological makeup, Jewish journalists and other writers expressed anguish, cried out for humanitarian assistance, and insisted on political intervention by the Allies and Jewish organizations. The response of the press, which began on a somewhat hopeful, disbelieving note, shifted to a more pained and insistent quality as revelations of the full extent of the Holocaust emerged. The Jewish press acknowledged its own failures to appreciate the enormity of what was transpiring, but did faithfully record events throughout the duration of the Shoah. It reported mass shooting, the driving of Jews into ghettos, the ensuing starvation of those terrible enclaves, high death rates, massacres in German-occupied lands, and the Nazi determination to rid Europe of Jews altogether. Through it all, the Jewish press remained cautiously optimistic about the possibility of saving the remaining European Jews and of building a Jewish community in Palestine following the war. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. R. C. Cottrell California State University, Chico
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This item was reviewed in:
Choice, June 2012
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This text shows the reaction of the Jewish press in the free countries in face of the Holocaust. The book argues that the Jewish press was the persistent open national voice fighting on behalf of the Jewish people suffering and perishing under Nazi occupation.
Description for Bookstore
In this book Yosef Gorny shows the reaction of the Jewish press in the free countries in the face of the Holocaust. The book explores the international Jewish public stance and argues that the Jewish press was the persistent open national voice fighting on behalf of the Jewish people.
Description for Bookstore
The main purpose of this book is to show the reaction of the Jewish press in the free countries in face of the Holocaust. The book explores the international Jewish public stance at that time with new comprehensive research. The book argues that the Jewish press was the persistent open national voice fighting on behalf of the Jewish people suffering and perishing under Nazi occupation.
Main Description
This book presents the results of comprehensive research into the world's Jewish press during the Second World War and explores its stance in the face of annihilation of the Jewish people by the Nazi regime in Europe. The research is based on the major Jewish newspapers that were published in four countries - Palestine, Britain, the United States, and the Soviet Union - and in three languages - Hebrew, Yiddish, and English. The Jewish press frequently described the situation of the Jewish people in occupied countries. It urged the Jewish leaders and institutions to act in rescue of their brethren. It protested vigorously against the refusal of the democratic leadership to recognize that the Jewish plight was unique because of the Nazi intention to annihilate Jews as a people. Yosef Gorny argues that the Jewish press was the persistent open national voice fighting on behalf of the Jewish people suffering and perishing under Nazi occupation.
Main Description
This book represents comprehensive research into the world's Jewish press during the Second World War and explores its stance in the face of annihilation of the Jewish people by the Nazi regime in Europe. The research is based on the major Jewish newspapers that were published in four countries – Palestine, Britain, the United States and the Soviet Union – and in three languages – Hebrew, Yiddish and English. The Jewish press frequently described the situation of the Jewish people in occupied countries. It urged the Jewish leaders and institutions to act in rescue of their brethren. It protested vigorously against the refusal of the democratic leadership to recognize that the Jewish plight was unique because of the Nazi intention to annihilate Jews as a people. Yosef Gorny argues that the Jewish press was the persistent open national voice fighting on behalf of the Jewish people suffering and perishing under Nazi occupation.
Main Description
This book represents comprehensive research into the world's Jewish press during the Second World War and explores its stance in the face of annihilation of the Jewish people by the Nazi regime in Europe. The research is based on the major Jewish newspapers that were published in four countries Palestine, Britain, the United States and the Soviet Union and in three languages Hebrew, Yiddish and English. The Jewish press frequently described the situation of the Jewish people in occupied countries. It urged the Jewish leaders and institutions to act in rescue of their brethren. It protested vigorously against the refusal of the democratic leadership to recognize that the Jewish plight was unique because of the Nazi intention to annihilate Jews as a people. Yosef Gorny argues that the Jewish press was the persistent open national voice fighting on behalf of the Jewish people suffering and perishing under Nazi occupation.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. ix
Introduction: The Transnational Communityp. 1
From Concern to Outcry - 1939-1942p. 21
The Hebrew-Language Press in Palestinep. 23
The American Jewish Pressp. 80
The Illusion Dashed - 1942-1945p. 103
The Hebrew-Language Press in Palestinep. 105
The American Jewish Press, 1942-1945p. 143
The British Jewish Press, 1939-1945p. 176
The Brief Days of Jewish National Unity: Aynikayt, 1942-1945p. 185
The Individual Confronts the Horrorp. 203
Yitzhak Gruenbaum - "The Main Culprit"p. 205
The Intellectuals' Delusional Optimismp. 220
Between Lidice and Majdanekp. 231
Remarks on the Continuing Jewish Angstp. 251
Conclusion: The Cry of the Helplessp. 267
Bibliographyp. 275
Indexp. 279
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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