Catalogue


Islamic society and state power in Senegal [electronic resource] : disciples and citizens in Fatick /
Leonardo A. Villalón.
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1995.
description
xix, 338 p. : map ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0521460077 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1995.
isbn
0521460077 (hardback)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
general note
The vast majority of Senegalese belong to the Sufi muslim orders which are among the most significant institutions of social organisations which the author argues have been a central component of a political system that has been among the most stable in Africa.
catalogue key
8365559
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 314-331) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1995-10:
In recent years African Islamic nations have not been particularly noted either for their stability or for success in maintaining democratic principles. Senegal, as a stunning exception to this observation, is the focus of Villal'on's intricate and intriguing study. Although his identification of Sufi politics as key to understanding changing state/citizen relations is not new, the depth with which he has studied the nexus between bureaucrats and believers is. Villal'on immersed himself in the political and Sufi culture of Fatick, a provincial town whose ethnic and religious variety is fully charted. Particularly impressive is his account of the multiple roles played by the various Sufi leaders, or marabouts, in mediating between secular administration and their disciples. His portrait of political influence, patronage, and manipulation occasionally recalls Tammany Hall, but also raises important contemporary questions regarding the "state-society struggle" within Africa and political Islam. This monograph deserves a wide readership among Africanists, political scientists, and students of Islam. All levels. J. A. Works Jr.; University of Missouri--St. Louis
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Through skillful use of sources and his own adroit analysis, Villalon develops his thesis convincingly....The work is useful for political scientists....Recommended for graduate students and specialists." Stephen Haarmon, Mesa Bulletin
"This book is an excellent addition to the corpus of work on Sengalese Islam in particular, as well as to our knowledge of state-society relations in Africa." Roy Dilley, Journal of Religion in Africa
"The theoretically dense discussion of this issue, and the rich analysis of Islam in Senegal makes this book a significant example of the sort of case study useful for introducing students to Islam." Religious Studies Review
‘… the detail of political relationships at a local level has never been as well presented as in this exemplary study, centred on the Serer town of Fatick. A wide and critical reading in the politics of Islam, and on state-society relations in Africa, situate the case study in a clear and well-argued theoretical perspective … Beautifully researched, rich in oral as well as documentary material.’African Affairs
'... the detail of political relationships at a local level has never been as well presented as in this exemplary study, centred on the Serer town of Fatick. A wide and critical reading in the politics of Islam, and on state-society relations in Africa, situate the case study in a clear and well-argued theoretical perspective ... Beautifully researched, rich in oral as well as documentary material.'African Affairs
"The author persuasively argues that Sufi brotherhoods, especially the Murid sect, have comprised the critical element in the Senegalese state's stability, exceptional in West Africa....Villalón's major work, should appeal to all Africanists interested in the social sciences." African Studies Review
'... the detail of political relationships at a local level has never been as well presented as in this exemplary study, centred on the Serer town of Fatick. A wide and critical reading in the politics of Islam, and on state-society relations in Africa, situate the case study in a clear and well-argued theoretical perspective ... Beautifully researched, rich in oral as well as documentary material.' African Affairs
"...deserves a wide readership among Africanists, political scientists, and students of Islam." Choice
"...Leonardo Villalón makes an excellent contribution to what has become, in recent years, the dominant issue in African political studies--the relationship between state and society....an important and well-researched book. Islamic Society and State Power in Senegal is a must for all scholars interested in Senegal and African politics." Comparative Politics
"...[an] exemplary study....[a] beautifully researched study, rich in oral as well as documentary material." African Affairs
"...an important contribution to the study of the relationship of religion to politics in Senegal and more generally in the Third World." Robert Launay, American Journal of Sociology
"...[an] intricate and intriguing study....This monograph deserves a wide readership among Africanists, political scientists, and students of Islam." Social & Behavioral Sciences
"...both case study and broad statement on African politics...provides some excellent synthesis and insight into the situations of the major Senegalese brotherhoods...Villalon has given us a richly textured, well-recounted description and analysis...Islamic Society will stand for some time to come as a model of research, as case study and broadly relevant statement, and as a thorough exploration of state-society relations. It would constitute a useful study for classes in African politics." International Journal of Middle East Studies
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, October 1995
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Summaries
Description for Bookstore
In Senegal, Sufi Muslim orders have contributed significantly to democracy and stability, Leo Villalon's superb study of these orders combines a detailed account of local politics with an analysis of national and international political forces. It should be read by every student of Islam and African politics.
Description for Bookstore
The Sufi Muslim orders are the most significant institutions in Senegales society. While Islamic political groups are often accused of destabilising African states, Leonardo Villalon argues that these brotherhoods have played a crucial part in making Senegal one of the most stable and democratic of African countries. Focusing on a regional administrative centre, he combines a detailed account of grassroots politics with an analysis of national and international political forces. This is a major study, that should be read by every student of Islam and African politics.
Main Description
The Sufi Muslim orders are the most significant institutions in Senegalese society. While Islamic political groups are often accused of destabilizing African states, Leonardo Villalon argues that these brotherhoods have played a crucial part in making Senegal one of the most stable and democratic of African countries. Focusing on a regional administrative center, he combines a detailed account of grassroots politics with an analysis of national and international political forces. This is a major study that should be read by every student of Islam and African politics.
Main Description
The Sufi Muslim orders to which the vast majority of Senegalese belong are the most significant institutions of social organization in the country. While studies of Islam and politics have tended to focus on the destabilizing force of religiously based groups, the author argues that in Senegal the orders have been a central component of a political system that has been among the most stable in Africa. Focusing on a regional administrative centre, he combines a detailed account of grassroots politics with an analysis of national and international forces to examine the ways in which the internal dynamics of the orders shape the exercise of power by the Senegalese. This is a major study that should be read by every student of Islam and politics as well as of Africa.
Table of Contents
List of tables
Acknowledgments
A note on spelling
Glossary
Map of Senegal
Introduction: good Africans, good citizens, good Muslims
Islam in the politics of state-society relations
The structure of society: Fatick in the Senegalese context
The state-citizen relationship: struggle over bridges
The marabout-disciple relationship I: foundations of recruiting and following
The marabout-disciple relationship II: the structures of allegiance
The state-marabout relationship: collaboration, conflict and alternatives
Bureaucrats, marabouts and citizen-disciples: how precarious a balance?
Notes
Select Bibliography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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