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Industry in the countryside [electronic resource] : Wealden society in the sixteenth century /
Michael Zell.
imprint
Cambridge [England] ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1994.
description
xv, 257 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0521445418 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Cambridge [England] ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1994.
isbn
0521445418 (hardback)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8364881
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 247-254) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1995-03:
Proposing the 16th-century Kentish Weald as a test case, Zell (Univ. of Greenwich, UK) offers an empirical examination of the protoindustrialization model. Preliminary chapters analyze such social categories as landholding; geographical mobility; and demographic, occupational, and household structure. Emphasizing "the link between agriculture and rural industry," Zell's work culminates in an investigation of the culture of Wealden textile manufacturing. Dual employment, it seems, was as integral to the economic success of workers as complementary landownership was to the prospects of employers. Zell pronounces protoindustrialization to be a useful model for describing "the social and demographic impact of fully-developed cottage industry." He finds it less helpful in explaining how and why rural manufacturing developed where it did and in predicting which protoindustrial areas would produce "modern" industry. The Weald de-industrialized during the 17th century, he claims, because its capitalist clothmakers "failed as entrepreneurs." In a work whose scope recalls Victor Skipp's Crisis and Development (1978), Zell's prose is admirably clear, and his use of archival sources is both judicious and imaginative. The inadequate index will diminish the usefulness of the volume for the scholars who will form its main audience. Graduate; faculty. M. C. Noonkester; William Carey College
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, March 1995
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This text explores the nature of manufacturing before the Industrial Revolution. It is a study of one English region where woollen textiles were produced by outworkers in their own cottages, on behalf of capitalist entrepreneurs.
Description for Bookstore
Industry in the Countryside explores the nature of manufacturing before the Industrial Revolution. It is a wide ranging study of the Kentish Weald - a region where woollen textiles were produced by outworkers in their own cottages, on behalf of capitalist entrepreneurs. Zell asks the question, is there anything in the 'proto- industrialisation' model?
Main Description
Industry in the Countryside is a wide-ranging and readable study of the nature of manufacturing before the Industrial Revolution. It examines the widely-debated theory of 'proto-industrialisation', drawing on data from the Kentish Weald - an area which was already a centre of cottage industry in the Tudor era and was also the earliest rural manufacturing region to 'de-industrialise'. The book analyses the Wealden textile industry from its workforce to its industrialists and emphasises the ubiquity of dual employment among textile workers. It explores the local context of cottage industry, investigating the pattern of landholding and inheritance, the local farming regime, and the demographic background to rural industrialisation. Zell outlines what type of local economy became the site of this so-called 'proto-industry' and shows the impact of cottage industry on the people of such regions. He concludes by asking, is there anything in the 'proto-industrialisation' model?
Table of Contents
Introduction
Landholding, inheritance and the local land market
Demographic movements, household structure and geographical mobility
The Wealden agrarian regime
Occupational structure and levels of wealth in the Weald
The textile industry in the Weald
Clothiers and capitalism
The Weald and 'proto-industrialisation'
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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