Catalogue

COVID-19: Updates on library services and operations.

How Australia decides [electronic resource] : election reporting and the media /
Sally Young.
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2011.
description
xxii, 323 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0521147077 (pbk.), 9780521147071 (pbk.)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2011.
isbn
0521147077 (pbk.)
9780521147071 (pbk.)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Election reporting in the 2000s -- pt. 1. Political news audiences and outlets. The political news audience -- The elite public sphere -- The popular public sphere -- Elections and audiences -- pt. 2. Where does election news come from and what is it about? Creating election news: journalists -- The stars of the show: politicians and campaigning -- Who controls the news agenda? -- 'From the campaign trail': the framing of election news -- pt. 3. Elections in mediated times. News, political reporting and the internet -- Bias -- News, the public and democracy.
catalogue key
8364365
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 287-307) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Sally Young is Senior Lecturer in the School of Social and Political Sciences at the University of Melbourne and Senior Research Fellow at the Centre for Advanced Journalism.
Reviews
Review Quotes
'Sally Young's excellent book not only clearly and compellingly addresses the major issues in media coverage of election campaigns, but for anyone interested in Australian politics in the early part of the 21st century, it offers a treasure trove of fascinating material.' Rodney Tiffen, University of Sydney
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Description for Bookstore
This groundbreaking book shows how election reporting has changed over time, and how political news audiences, news production and shifts in political campaigning are influencing media content with profound implications for Australian democracy.
Main Description
In recent years, the Australian media have come under fire for their reporting of politics and election campaigns. Political reporting is said to be too influenced by commercial concerns, too obsessed with gossip and scandal, and too focused on trivia and 'sound bites' at the expense of serious issues. There are accusations of bias, sensationalism, 'lazy' journalism and 'horse-race' reporting that is obsessed with opinion polls. How Australia Decides is the first book to put these allegations to the test. Based on a four-year empirical study, Sally Young reports the results of the only systematic, historical and in-depth analysis of Australian election reporting. This groundbreaking book shows how election reporting has changed over time, and how political news audiences, news production and shifts in political campaigning are influencing media content with profound implications for Australian democracy.
Table of Contents
List of tables, figures and boxesp. ix
Acknowledgementsp. xiv
Prefacep. xvii
Election reporting in the 2000sp. 1
Political news audiences and outlets
The political news audiencep. 23
The elite public spherep. 42
The popular public spherep. 61
Elections and audiencesp. 84
Where does election news come from and what is it about?
Creating election news: journalistsp. 107
The stars of the show: politicians and campaigningp. 126
Who controls the news agenda?p. 145
'From the campaign trail': the framing of election newsp. 173
Elections in mediated times
News, political reporting and the internetp. 203
Biasp. 229
News, the public and democracyp. 255
Appendixp. 281
Notesp. 284
Referencesp. 287
Indexp. 309
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem