Catalogue


The Greeks and the new [electronic resource] : novelty in ancient Greek imagination and experience /
Armand D'Angour.
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2011.
description
x, 264 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
9780521850971 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2011.
isbn
9780521850971 (hardback)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Machine generated contents note: 1. New, new, new; 2. Loosening the grip of the past; 3. The transformations of Kaineus; 4. Old and new; 5. Nothing new under the sun; 6. The birth of Athena; 7. Inventions of Eris; 8. The newest song; 9. Constructions of novelty; 10. So what's new?
abstract
"The Greeks have long been regarded as innovators across a wide range of fields in literature, culture, philosophy, politics and science. However, little attention has been paid to how they thought and felt about novelty and innovation itself, and to relating this to the forces of traditionalism and conservatism which were also present across all the various societies within ancient Greece. What inspired the Greeks to embark on their unique and enduring innovations? How did they think and feel about the new? This book represents the first serious attempt to address these issues, and deals with the phenomenon across all periods and areas of classical Greek history and thought. Each chapter concentrates on a different area of culture or thought, while the book as a whole argues that much of the impulse towards innovation came from the life of the polis which provided its setting"--
catalogue key
8363878
 
Includes bibliographical references and indexes.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Armand DAngour is Fellow and tutor in Classics at Jesus College Oxford
Reviews
Review Quotes
'(An) engaging and aptly original study.' Times Literary Supplement
'[Angour's] knowledge of Greek literature is exhaustive and he has a gift for the apt quotation, so every page glitters with gold nuggets.' The Spectator
'[D'Angour's] knowledge of Greek literature is exhaustive and he has a gift for the apt quotation, so every page glitters with gold nuggets.' The Spectator
'… this is a fascinating, engaging book. D'Angour has demonstrated that the ancient Greeks, in almost every sphere, believed that novelty, change, and newness were not necessarily things that 'just happen'. Rather, as he shows, these phenomena could be seen as the result of human intention, ambition, skill, effort, and ingenuity. In a field that has only recently begun to remember its roots in (and its obligations to) the minds of ancient individuals, D'Angour's The Greeks and the New shows the way forward. Not to be missed.' Bryn Mawr Classical Review
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
The Greeks have long been regarded as innovators across a wide range of fields in literature, culture, philosophy, politics and science. However, little attention has been paid to how they thought and felt about novelty and innovation itself, and to relating this to the forces of traditionalism and conservatism which were also present across all the various societies within ancient Greece. What inspired the Greeks to embark on their unique and enduring innovations? How did they think and feel about the new? This 2011 book represents the first serious attempt to address these issues, and deals with the phenomenon across all periods and areas of classical Greek history and thought. Each chapter concentrates on a different area of culture or thought, while the book as a whole argues that much of the impulse towards innovation came from the life of the polis which provided its setting.
Main Description
The Greeks have long been regarded as innovators across a wide range of fields in literature, culture, philosophy, politics and science. However, little attention has been paid to how they thought and felt about novelty and innovation itself, and to relating this to the forces of traditionalism and conservatism which were also present across all the various societies within ancient Greece. What inspired the Greeks to embark on their unique and enduring innovations? How did they think and feel about the new? This book represents the first serious attempt to address these issues, and deals with the phenomenon across all periods and areas of classical Greek history and thought. Each chapter concentrates on a different area of culture or thought, while the book as a whole argues that much of the impulse towards innovation came from the life of the polis which provided its setting.
Bowker Data Service Summary
This text casts new light on a wide range of evidence for novelty and innovation in ancient Greece. It embraces disciplines ranging from music to warfare, and ideas spanning pluralism and competitive advantage.
Description for Bookstore
This 2011 book casts light on a wide range of evidence for novelty and innovation in ancient Greece. It embraces disciplines ranging from music to warfare, and ideas spanning pluralism and competitive advantage. Evidence from Greek thought, art and history is examined to illuminate novelty in ancient Greece and beyond.
Description for Bookstore
This book casts new light on a wide range of evidence for novelty and innovation in ancient Greece. It embraces disciplines ranging from music to warfare, and ideas spanning pluralism and competitive advantage. Evidence from Greek thought, art and history is examined to illuminate novelty in ancient Greece and beyond.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgementsp. ix
Introductionp. 1
New, new, newp. 11
Novelty in Greek Culturep. 12
'New': word and conceptp. 19
The psychology of noveltyp. 27
Dimensions of noveltyp. 32
Loosening the grip of the pastp. 36
The grip of the pastp. 41
Novelty and timep. 43
Novelty and multiplicityp. 49
Nothing newp. 52
Song's new chariot?p. 57
Conclusionsp. 61
The transformations of Kaineusp. 64
Two words for newp. 66
The emergence oúkainosp. 71
The myth of Kaineusp. 74
The mark oiqayinp. 79
Old and newp. 85
The Pythagorean tablep. 90
Old and youngp. 98
Old versus newp. 102
Kaina kaipalaiap. 104
Nothing new under the sunp. 108
What's new under the sunp. 109
Cycles of noveltyp. 112
Cycles of naturep. Il6
Ex arkhesp. 119
Thinking new thoughts (1)p. 122
Thinking new thoughts (2)p. 126
Ex oriente novitasp. 129
The birth of Athenap. 134
The brainchild of Zeusp. 138
The radiance of the newp. 141
Novelty and wonderp. 148
The shock of the newp. 150
Birth into the newp. 157
Inventions of Erisp. 162
Serious playp. 166
The gleam of gloryp. 170
Innovation in battlep. 173
Inventions of warp. 177
Inventions of peacep. 179
Conclusionsp. 181
The newest songp. 184
The discourse of noveltyp. 190
Prin and nun - then and nowp. 195
A tradition of innovationp. 198
New music, new soundsp. 202
Constructions of noveltyp. 207
Novelty in the airp. 211
The innovationist turnp. 216
So what's new?p. 225
Referencesp. 233
General indexp. 247
Index of Greek termsp. 253
Index locorump. 255
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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