Catalogue


Gadamer and the legacy of German idealism [electronic resource] /
Kristin Gjesdal.
imprint
Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2009.
description
xvii, 235 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0521509645 (hardback : alk. paper), 9780521509640 (hardback : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2009.
isbn
0521509645 (hardback : alk. paper)
9780521509640 (hardback : alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Art, dialogue, and historical knowledge : appropriating Kant's Critique of judgment -- Beyond the third Critique : epistemological skepticism and aesthetic consciousness -- Overcoming the problems of modern philosophy : art, truth, and the turn to ontology -- History, reflection, and self-determination : critiquing the Enlightenment and Hegel -- Schleiermacher's critical theory of interpretation -- Normativity, critique, and reflection : the hermeneutic legacy of German Idealism.
catalogue key
8363359
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 219-230) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2010-02-01:
Gjesdal (Temple Univ.) has published papers in numerous journals including Kant-Studien, Journal of the History of Philosophy, and the British Journal of the History of Philosophy. This is her first book-length publication, in Cambridge's "Modern European Philosophy" series. Gjesdal's erudition is impressive, although her prose is not always as clear as it could be. Nor is her attitude toward Gadamerian philosophy, which makes the work primarily of value to advanced students and faculty who already know the landscape of 19th- and 20th-century German philosophy and the stakes of relevant debates. The individual chapters of the book are concerned with how various parts of Gadamer's philosophy--especially its aesthetics--rely on misreadings of key figures like Kant, Hegel, and Schleiermacher. Gjesdal is frequently insightful with regard to particular aspects of Gadamer's thinking, despite seeming to misunderstand or simply reject the way they coalesce in his philosophical hermeneutics. Ultimately, she urges a Schleiermachean rejection of the "ontological turn." This work is an intelligent contribution to historical debates in hermeneutics and phenomenology. Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate students and researchers/faculty. P. Amato Drexel University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"In this often insightful and well-argued book, Kristin Gjesdal focuses valuable attention on Gadamer's treatment of major philosophers of German Idealism and Romanticism in a critical consideration of some of the central ideas of philosophical hermeneutics..." --Peter Amato, Drexel University, Research in Phenomenology
"....Kristin Gjesdal's book fits neatly into this newly-discovered interest in Gadamer's philosophy.... lucidly written....her book offers a variety of critical insights. It can be recommended to every scholar of Gadamer's philosophy who is interested in both historical reconstructions and systematic arguments." --Christian Lotz, Michigan State University, Journal of the History of Philosophy
'This is a well written, well conceived and highly illuminating study of Gadamer's hermeneutics. The book analyses with exemplary subtlety and intelligence Gadamer's interpretation of Kant's Third Critique, Romanticism, Hegel's idea of history, Heidegger's understanding of art, and Schleiermacher's hermeneutics ... The book thus provides - via its discussion of Gadamer - an impressive and insightful study of some of the major figures in post-Kantian thought.' Stephen Houlgate, University of Warwick
"...This work is an intelligent contribution to historical debates in hermeneutics and phenomenology... [Recommended]..." --P. Amato, Drexel University, Choice
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, February 2010
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Summaries
Main Description
The philosophy of Hans-Georg Gadamer interests a wide audience that spans the traditional distinction between European (continental) and Anglo-American (analytic) philosophy. Yet one of the most important and complex aspects of his work - his engagement with German Idealism - has received comparatively little attention. In this book, Kristin Gjesdal uses a close analysis and critical investigation of Gadamer's Truth and Method (1960) to show that his engagement with Kant, Hegel, and Schleiermacher is integral to his conception of hermeneutics. She argues that a failure to engage with this aspect of Gadamer's philosophy leads to a misunderstanding of the most pressing problem of post-Heideggerian hermeneutics: the tension between the commitment to the self-criticism of reason, on the one hand, and the turn towards the meaning-constituting authority of tradition, on the other. Her study provides an illuminating assessment of both the merits and the limitations of Gadamer's thought.
Bowker Data Service Summary
In this book, Kristin Gjesdal uses a close analysis and critical investigation of Gadamer's 'Truth and Method' (1960) to show that Gadamer's engagement with Kant, Hegel, and Schleiermacher is integral to his conception of hermeneutics.
Description for Bookstore
Kristin Gjesdal uses a close analysis and critical investigation of Gadamer's Truth and Method (1960) to show that his engagement with Kant, Hegel, and Schleiermacher is integral to his conception of hermeneutics. Her study provides an illuminating assessment of both the merits and the limitations of Gadamer's thought.
Description for Bookstore
This 2009 study provides an illuminating assessment of both the merits and the limitations of Hans-Georg Gadamer's philosophical thought. Kristin Gjesdal uses a close analysis and critical investigation of Gadamer's Truth and Method (1960) to show that his engagement with Kant, Hegel, and Schleiermacher is integral to his conception of hermeneutics.
Main Description
This book was first published in 2009. The philosophy of Hans-Georg Gadamer interests a wide audience that spans the traditional distinction between European (continental) and Anglo-American (analytic) philosophy. Yet one of the most important and complex aspects of his work - his engagement with German Idealism - has received comparatively little attention. In this book, Kristin Gjesdal uses a close analysis and critical investigation of Gadamer's Truth and Method (1960) to show that his engagement with Kant, Hegel, and Schleiermacher is integral to his conception of hermeneutics. She argues that a failure to engage with this aspect of Gadamer's philosophy leads to a misunderstanding of the most pressing problem of post-Heideggerian hermeneutics: the tension between the commitment to the self-criticism of reason, on the one hand, and the turn towards the meaning-constituting authority of tradition, on the other. Her study provides an illuminating assessment of both the merits and the limitations of Gadamer's thought.

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