Catalogue

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Faded dreams [electronic resource] : the politics and economics of race in America /
Martin Carnoy.
imprint
Cambridge [England] ; New York, NY, USA : Cambridge University Press, 1994.
description
x, 286 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0521470625
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Cambridge [England] ; New York, NY, USA : Cambridge University Press, 1994.
isbn
0521470625
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8362694
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 248-273) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Faded Dreams details specific and compelling evidence about patterns of racially based economic injustice, and explains why it persists in America. Professor Carnoy makes a solid case that the government must intervene more to resolve these problems." Congressman John Conyers, Jr. (1st Congressional District, Michigan)
"Faded Dreams is the most important book on race and the economy in quite a few years....Carnoy's reminder of the power of political intervention sounds a bracing wake-up call in this era of poltical cynicism." Chris Tilly, American Journal of Sociology
"This is a straightforward, informative, clearheaded, and useful book....Generalists will learn a lot from this book; specialists will learn some; and anyone interested in the politics and economics of race will do well to read it." The Annals of the American Academy
"With persuasiveness and passion, Martin Carnoy demonstrates that government must be the key actor in solving America's racial dilemma." Nicholas Lemann, author of the The Promised Land
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Description for Bookstore
Faded Dreams paints a new and challenging picture of why racial inequality changes in America. The author argues that blacks caught up with whites mainly when government policies, under political pressure by blacks and an important segment of the white community, pushed for greater racial equality.
Description for Library
Faded Dreams paints a new and challenging picture of why racial inequality changes in America. The author argues that blacks caught up with whites mainly when government policies, under political pressure by blacks and an important segment of the white community, pushed for greater racial equality. Similarly, the greatest obstacles to black gains in other periods have also been government policies. These policies usually assumed away the race problem or used it against blacks for political purposes.
Main Description
Faded Dreams paints a new and challenging picture of why racial inequality changes in America. The author argues that blacks caught up with whites mainly when government policies, under political pressure by blacks and an important segment of the white community, pushed for greater racial equality. Similarly, the greatest obstacles to black gains in other periods have also been government policies. These policies usually assumed away the race problem or used it against blacks for political purposes. Faded Dreams shows that three dominant views of economic differences between blacks and whites - that blacks are individually responsible for not taking advantage of market opportunities, that the world economy has changed in ways that puts blacks at a tremendous disadvantage compared to whites, and that pervasive racism is holding blacks down - do not adequately explain why blacks made such large gains in the past and stopped making them in the 1980s and 1990s.
Table of Contents
Introduction
The ups and downs of African-American fortunes
The politics of explaining inequality
Are blacks to blame?
Is the economy to blame?
Has racism and discrimination increased?
Politics and black educational opportunity
Politics and black job opportunities (I)
Politics and black job opportunities (II)
Black economic gains and ideology: The White House factor
Any hope for greater equality?
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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