Catalogue

COVID-19: Updates on library services and operations.

Drama and politics in the English Civil War [electronic resource] /
Susan Wiseman.
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1998.
description
xviii, 297 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0521472210 (hb)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1998.
isbn
0521472210 (hb)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8360315
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 262-289) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1998-11:
In this interesting study, Wiseman (Univ. of Warwick, UK) argues that Parliament's 1642 edict to close the theaters was not primarily a measure of moral reform, but rather an attempt to suppress controversy and an appeal to public support in a time of political crisis. In fact, according to the author, the shutting down of playhouses intensified the political status of dramatic discourse by producing the pamphlet dialogue or "playlet" as a genre to "stage" politics and by making printed drama and the performance of plays and operas a popular language of politics. On these grounds, Wiseman challenges both the generally accepted view that the years 1642-60 constitute a gap in the history of English drama and the assumption that the "dramatic" productions of the period were solely royalist: in fact, they were produced by writers with differing political perspectives. Most of these writers will be familiar only to specialists (Davenant, Shirley, Flecknoe, and Margaret Cavendish are the best known among them), but the issues Wiseman considers--the political transformation of aesthetics, the positioning of women by political discourse, the politics of opera and tragicomedy--have broader significance. Graduate students; researchers; faculty. G. R. Wasserman; Russell Sage College
Reviews
Review Quotes
'... breathes new life into the traditional historiography of this fascinating period, challenging us to attend to neglected voices and lives.' History Today
'... breathes new life into the traditional historiography of this fascinating period, challenging us to attend to neglected voices and lives.'History Today
‘… breathes new life into the traditional historiography of this fascinating period, challenging us to attend to neglected voices and lives.’History Today
"In this interesting study, Wiseman...argues that Parliament's 1642 edict to close the theaters was not primarily a measure of moral reform, but rather an attempt to suppress controversy and an appeal to public support in a time of political crisis. Graduate students; researchers; faculty." Choice
"Susan Wiseman examines a neglected body of dramatic literature and exposes the fraility of the presumption of a sharp break between the Caroline and Restoration dramatic traditions." Bryon Nelson, Theatre Journal
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, November 1998
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This work argues that the period 1640 to 1660 was not a gap in the production & performance of drama nor a blank space between Renaissance drama & the Restoration stage. Rather, writers focused on a range of dramas with political perspectives.
Description for Bookstore
In 1642 an ordinance closed the theatres of England. Critics and historians have assumed that the edict was to be firm and inviolate. Susan Wiseman challenges this assumption and argues that the period 1640 to 1660 was not a gap in the production and performance of drama. Rather, throughout the period writers focused instead on a range of dramas with political perspectives, from republican to royalist. In analysing the diverse forms of dramatic production of the 1640s and 1650s, Wiseman offers new insights into the theatre of the Civil War.
Description for Bookstore
In 1642 an ordinance closed the theatres of England. Historians have assumed that the edict was to be firm and inviolate. Susan Wiseman challenges this assumption and argues that the period 1640 to 1660 was not a gap in the production and performance of drama. Rather, writers focused instead on a range of dramas with political perspectives, from republican to royalist.
Description for Library
In 1642 an ordinance closed the theatres of England. Critics and historians have assumed that the edict was to be firm and inviolate. Susan Wiseman challenges this assumption and argues that the period 1640 to 1660 was not a gap in the production and performance of drama. Rather, throughout the period writers focused instead on a range of dramas with political perspectives, from republican to royalist. In analysing the diverse forms of dramatic production of the 1640s and 1650s, Wiseman offers insights into the theatre of the Civil War.
Main Description
In 1642 an ordinance closed the theaters of England. Critics and historians have assumed that the edict was firm and inviolate. Susan Wiseman challenges this assumption and argues that the period 1640 to 1660 was not a gap in the production and performance of drama. Rather, throughout the period writers focused instead on a range of dramas with political perspectives, from republican to royalist. In analyzing the diverse forms of dramatic production of the 1640s and 1650s, Wiseman offers new insights into the theater of the Civil War.
Main Description
In 1642 an ordinance closed the theatres of England. Critics and historians have assumed that the edict was to be firm and inviolate. Susan Wiseman challenges this assumption and argues that the period 1640 to 1660 was not a gap in the production and performance of drama nor a blank space between 'Renaissance drama' and the 'Restoration stage'. Rather, throughout the period, writers focused instead on a range of dramas with political perspectives, from republican to royalist. This group included the short pamphlet dramas of the 1640s and the texts produced by the writers of the 1650s, such as William Davenant, Margaret Cavendish and James Shirley. In analysing the diverse forms of dramatic production of the 1640s and 1650s, Wiseman reveals the political and generic diversity produced by the changes in dramatic production, and offers insights into the theatre of the Civil War.
Table of Contents
List of illustrations
A note on texts and list of abbreviations
Acknowledgements
Preface
Introduction: how the drama disappeared
1642-1649: Cases in Politics and Drama
New news for a new world? Genre, politics and the news dialogues of the 1640s
'With the agreement of the people in their hands': transformations of 'radical' drama in the 1640s
Royalist versus republican ethics and aesthetics: The Famous Tragedie of Charles I and The Tragedy of the Famous Orator Marcus Tullius Cicero
Interchapter: 'The Life of Action': playing, action and discourse on performance in the 1640s
The 1650s: Protectorate, Politics and Performance
Gender and status in dramatic discourse
Margaret Cavendish, Duchess of Newcastle
Royal or reformed? The politics of court entertainment in translation and performance
National identity, topic and genre in Davenant's Protectorate opera
Genre, politics and place: the social body in the dramatic career of John Tatham
True and loyal? politics and genre in Civil War and Protectorate tragicomedy
Coda
Notes
Select Bibliography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem