Catalogue

COVID-19: Updates on library services and operations.

Content strategy at work [electronic resource] : real-world stories to strengthen every interactive project /
Margot Bloomstein ; with a foreword by Kristina Halvorson.
imprint
Waltham, MA : Morgan Kaufmann, c2012.
description
xiv, 163 p. : col. ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0123919223 (alk. paper), 9780123919229 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Waltham, MA : Morgan Kaufmann, c2012.
isbn
0123919223 (alk. paper)
9780123919229 (alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8359238
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Margot Bloomstein Principal of Appropriate, Inc. bloomstein
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Bloomstein is at her most thought provoking when she shines the light on complex projects that present a host of strategic, editorial, design, organizational and technical challenges. For example, the case of the television network that wanted to comingle its programming content with encyclopedic information, a goal that required the active use of nearly every wrench and screwdriver in the CS toolkit. It demonstrates the highly strategic and supremely tactical nature of content strategy in a single project, including a healthy portion of organizational challenge, a common byproduct of smart content choices. In Content Strategy at Work, Bloomstein frames the cases with meaningful context, crisp approaches to problem solving (I will definitely be cribbing from her message architecture client exercise, which she generously shares) and genuine curiosity." --ScatterGather.Razorfish.com
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, June 2012
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This text offers real-world examples and approaches you can adopt, no matter what your role on the team. Put content strategy to work for you by gathering this book into your little hands and gobbling up never-before seen case studies from teams at Johns Hopkins Medicine, MINI, Icebreaker, and more.
Main Description
Content is king... and the new kingmaker... and your message better align with your model and metrics and other mumbo jumbo, right? Whether you slog through theory or buzzwords, content strategy is coming of age. But what's in it for you? And if you're not a content strategist, why should you care?
Main Description
Content is king and the new kingmaker and your message needs to align with your model and metrics and other mumbo jumbo, right? Whether you re slogging through theory or buzzwords, there s no denying content strategy is coming of age. But what s in it for you? And if you re not a content strategist, why should you care? Because even if content strategy isn t your job, content s probably your problem-and probably more than you think. You or your business has a message you want to deliver, right? You can deliver that message through various channels and content types, from Tweets to testimonials and photo galleries galore, and your audience has just as many ways of engaging with it. So many ways, so much content so where s the problem? That is the problem. And you can measure it in time, creativity, money, lost opportunity, and the sobs you hear equally from creative directors, project managers, and search engine marketing specialists. The solution is content strategy, and this book offers real-world examples and approaches you can adopt, no matter your role on the team. Put content strategy to work for you by gathering this book into your little hands and gobbling up never-before seen case studies from teams at Johns Hopkins Medicine, MINI, Icebreaker, and more. Content Strategy at Work is a book for designers, information architects, copywriters, project managers, and anyone who works with visual or verbal content. It discusses how you can communicate and forge a plan that will enable you, your company, or your client get that message across and foster better user experiences. Presents a content strategy framework and ways to implement in both in-house marketing departments and consultancies Includes case studies, interviews, and lessons learned from retail, apparel, network television, business-to-business, automotive, non-profit, and higher ed brands Details practical sales techniques to sell content strategy and use content strategy processes to sell other services and larger projects
Main Description
Content is king. and the new kingmaker. and your message needs to align with your model and metrics and other mumbo jumbo, right? Whether you're slogging through theory or buzzwords, there's no denying content strategy is coming of age. But what's in it for you? And if you're not a content strategist, why should you care? Because even if content strategy isn't your job, content's probably your problem-and probably more than you think. You or your business has a message you want to deliver, right? You can deliver that message through various channels and content types, from Tweets to testimonials and photo galleries galore, and your audience has just as many ways of engaging with it. So many ways, so much content. so where's the problem? That is the problem. And you can measure it in time, creativity, money, lost opportunity, and the sobs you hear equally from creative directors, project managers, and search engine marketing specialists. The solution is content strategy, and this book offers real-world examples and approaches you can adopt, no matter your role on the team. Put content strategy to work for you by gathering this book into your little hands and gobbling up never-before seen case studies from teams at Johns Hopkins Medicine, MINI, Icebreaker, and more. Content Strategy at Work is a book for designers, information architects, copywriters, project managers, and anyone who works with visual or verbal content. It discusses how you can communicate and forge a plan that will enable you, your company, or your client get that message across and foster better user experiences. Presents a content strategy framework and ways to implement in both in-house marketing departments and consultancies Includes case studies, interviews, and lessons learned from retail, apparel, network television, business-to-business, automotive, non-profit, and higher ed brands Details practical sales techniques to sell content strategy and use content strategy processes to sell other services and larger projects
Main Description
Content is king. and the new kingmaker. and your message needs to align with your model and metrics and other mumbo jumbo, right? Whether you're slogging through theory or buzzwords, there's no denying content strategy is coming of age. But what's in it for you? And if you're not a content strategist, why should you care? Because even if content strategy isn't your job, content's probably your problem-and probably more than you think. You or your business has a message you want to deliver, right? You can deliver that message through various channels and content types, from Tweets to testimonials and photo galleries galore, and your audience has just as many ways of engaging with it. So many ways, so much content. so where's the problem? That is the problem. And you can measure it in time, creativity, money, lost opportunity, and the sobs you hear equally from creative directors, project managers, and search engine marketing specialists. The solution is content strategy, and this book offers real-world examples and approaches you can adopt, no matter your role on the team. Put content strategy to work for you by gathering this book into your little hands and gobbling up never-before seen case studies from teams at Johns Hopkins Medicine, MINI, Icebreaker, and more. Content Strategy at Work is a book for designers, information architects, copywriters, project managers, and anyone who works with visual or verbal content. It discusses how you can communicate and forge a plan that will enable you, your company, or your client get that message across and foster better user experiences. Presents a solid content strategy framework and ways to implement in your business and with your clients Includes a multitude of case studies interviews both successes and failures from different industries and a variety of company types Details what you need to incorporate best practices such as resources, time, and budget
Table of Contents
Forewordp. xi
Thank Youp. xiii
About the Authorp. xv"
How content strategy can helpp. 1
Opportunity versus priorityp. 1
All the tea in China, all the content types on the webp. 2
Tough choices require something stronger than just teap. 3
What is content strategy?p. 4
Where's this all coming from, anyhow?p. 4
Developing a definitionp. 5
Who should use this bookùand what you can expectp. 10
We all want the same things but content gets in the wayp. 11
What's insidep. 12
Fail to plan? Plan to fail among monstersp. 13
Designing cohesive experiences: Introducing content strategy to designp. 19
Deriving design from content at MOOp. 19
Why bring content strategy into the team?p. 23
If you don't know what you need to communicate,
how will you know if you succeed?p. 24
How does message architecture drive the content and design?p. 27
Establish a message architecture through cardsortingp. 28
Tools, materials, and rolesp. 29
Step one: categorizep. 31
Step two: filterp. 33
Step three: prioritize and closep. 34
Quick and dirty: establish a message architecture with a Venn diagramp. 34
Tools, materials, and rolesp. 35
Step one: define the brand offeringp. 35
Step two: define the audience needsp. 36
Step three: focus and prioritizep. 37
Deliveryp. 37
Okay, but who's going to pay for this?p. 37
Pulling it all together with consistencyùand copyp. 38
Case in point: a user experience with traditional content typesp. 40
Taking it further: designing for user-generated contentp. 41
Embracing reality: Incorporating content strategy into project management and information architecturep. 47
Informing scope and governance at Johns Hopkins Medicinep. 47
Understand the challenge and need for content strategyp. 48
Ask tougher questions of your contentp. 51
Conduct an audit that meets your needsp. 52
Quantitative, then qualitativep. 53
Determine quality, or the many ways to talk turkeyp. 58
Is it current, relevant, and appropriate?p. 60
Is it redundant, outdated, or trivial?p. 61
The Creating Valuable Content Checklistp. 62
Some information is better than none: Core sample your contentp. 64
Case in point: Volume versus valuep. 66
From audit to analysis to scopep. 68
Document and train for governance and post-launch successp. 68
Hire and organize for governancep. 70
Roll out editorial style guidelines to make the message architecture actionablep. 73
Add an editorial calendar to prepare for consistencyp. 74
Use a rolling audit to monitor and maintainp. 76
Executing on content strategy through copywriting, creation, and curationp. 79
Know your story to tell it wellp. 79
Align purpose, goals, and processp. 80
Evolve the story over timep. 81
From audit to actionp. 82
Curate content to drive the user experiencep. 85
Translate the audit into requirements and taxonomyp. 86
Integrating curationp. 88
Changing the culturep. 89
Divide and conquerp. 89
Prescriptive content matrixp. 90
Etiitqfial style guidelinesp. 90
Planning for the futurep. 91
Coupling content strategy with search engine optimizationp. 95
Tie one on for search enginesùand customersp. 95
Optimize content types and tonep. 96
Seo and content strategy collaboration spells successp. 99
Shape Seo through the message architecture, content audit, and editorial planp. 100
Improving content management with content strategyp. 105
Reframe the conversationp. 105
Elevate the value of content managementp. 106
Develop a content modelp. 108
Create a culture of sharing, education, and maintenancep. 109
Cultivate a culture of governancep. 112
Facilitate successp. 114
Editorial style guidelinesp. 115
So whose problem is itùand where do we go from here?p. 116
Grounding social media in content strategyp. 121
Maintain consistency, channel to channelp. 121
Start with a message architecturep. 122
Choose channels that meet your communication goalsùand audiencep. 124
Making it your ownùand sharing with the worldp. 125
Continuing the conversationp. 129
Plan for sustainabilityp. 130
Build conversations with commitment that transcends the campaignp. 131
Choose channels appropriate for your goals, resources, and constraintsp. 132
Coordinate cross-channel style with editorial guidelinesp. 133
Coordinate channel messaging with an editorial calendarp. 136
Growing the business and getting to workp. 139
Get a seat at the tablep. 139
Use content strategy to winp. 140
Demonstrate commitment beyond the campaign or launchp. 140
Demonstrate you have a comprehensive offering that
addresses why people use the webp. 142
Help them embrace content as an assetp. 144
Use content strategy as a wedgep. 147
Start by listening to the issuesp. 147
Conduct a high-level audit to inform scope with greater realityp. 148
Stop reading and get to workp. 150
Indexp. 151
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem