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The chief governors [electronic resource] : the rise and fall of reform government in Tudor Ireland, 1536-1588 /
Ciaran Brady.
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1994.
description
xviii, 322 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0521461766 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1994.
isbn
0521461766 (hardback)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8358517
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 301-316) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1995-11:
Continuity versus change provides history with constant tension. Recent interpretations of Tudor England have tended to emphasize the former over the latter, suggesting that administrative reform was not limited to the 1530s or to Elizabeth's early years. Such changing interpretations are bound to include Ireland. In this book, Brady seeks out continuity in the policies, concerns, problems, and frustrations of the successive English governors sent to Dublin. None were successful in achieving the two contrary goals of securing obedience to the English Crown while reducing the drain of Ireland on the English exchequer. In the 1590s, war with Spain brought change, as the call for economy gave way to security needs; military force replaced peaceful persuasion, but Brady stops short of this period, concluding rather abruptly in 1588. This scholarly study will be useful to advanced students of Irish history, but general readers will be frustrated by Brady's careful qualifications and reluctance to generalize. J. W. Weingart; Whitman College
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Chief Governors marks a definite advance in the long-running debate on the nature of Tudor government in Ireland." Padraig Lenihan,Law and History Review
"His conclusions and ideas are sound and well-supported by primary documentation and exhaustive references....This book is a provocative and challenging work that unquestionably fulfills the intention of the Cambridge Historical Series." Irish Literary Supplement
"...its finely crafted arguments are an important contribution to the study of multi-national kingdoms in the early modern period and of the British Isles in particular." The Historian
"...our perception of Ireland's history during the second half of the sixteenth century will have to be revised." Canadian Journal of History
"...the argument is bold and iconoclastic indeed....Brady masterfully weaves together the complex and volatile political interaction between the colonial governors and the Old English magnates of Ireland....an excellent study on an underexplored area of early modern history....will certainly force early modern Irish historians to rethink some of the most basic questions of the Tudor period. Without question, The Chief Governors is one of the most important studies of early modern Ireland to appear in recent years, and it is highly recommended not only for specialists in the field, but also for anyone interested in gaining some interesting perspectives on the nature of political reform and the implementation of colonial rule during the early modern period." Samantha A. Meigs, Sixteenth Century Journal
'The Chief Governors is a compelling book, lucidly and elegantly written ... this is a hugely important book which no one interested in early modern Ireland can afford to ignore. It should set the terms of debate for years to come.' Andrew Hadfield, Irish Studies Review
'The Chief Governors is a compelling book, lucidly and elegantly written ... this is a hugely important book which no one interested in early modern Ireland can afford to ignore. It should set the terms of debate for years to come.'Andrew Hadfield, Irish Studies Review
‘The Chief Governors is a compelling book, lucidly and elegantly written … this is a hugely important book which no one interested in early modern Ireland can afford to ignore. It should set the terms of debate for years to come.’Andrew Hadfield, Irish Studies Review
"...this book is exceedingly well-documented, clearly written, and purposefully executed...it must be read as an important restatement of the 'pattern' of governance in mid-Tudor Ireland." American Historical Review
"This scholarly study will be useful to advanced students of Irish history..." Choice
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, November 1995
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Summaries
Description for Bookstore
This book offers a fundamental critique of conventional views of sixteenth-century Irish history. It argues that reform rather than conquest was the aim of Tudor policy-makers, but shows that immense difficulties forced them to make administrative innovations which contradicted their original policy.
Description for Library
This book offers a fundamental critique of conventional views of sixteenth-century Irish history which have stressed the centrality of colonisation and military confrontation. It argues that reform rather than conquest was the aim of Tudor policy-makers, but shows that the immense difficulties faced by the reformers in pursuing their objectives forced them to make administrative innovations which ultimately contradicted and undermined their original policy.
Main Description
This book offers an extended reinterpretation of English policy in Ireland over the sixteenth century. It seeks to show that the major conflicts between Tudor governors and native lords which characterised the period were not the result of a deliberate Tudor strategy of confrontation, but arose from a failed experiment in legal reform and cultural assimilation which had been applied with remarkable success elsewhere in the Tudor dominions. The book identifies a distinct administrative style which evolved in Irish government in the mid-sixteenth century under a complex set of pressures acting on the would-be reformers both in Ireland and at the Tudor court, and argues that it was this highly centralised and intensely activist mode of government that undermined the aims of reform policy and provoked alienation and hostility.
Table of Contents
Preface
Acknowledgements
Abbreviations
Prologue: Ireland in the Wake of the Kildare Rebellion, 1536p. 1
The Course of Reform Government, 1536-1578p. 11
Reform as Process: The Viceroyalties of Lord Leonard Grey and Sir Anthony St Leger, 1536-1547p. 13
Ireland and the Mid-Tudor Crisis, 1547-1556p. 45
Reform by Programme: The Viceroyalties of the Earl of Sussex, 1556-1565p. 72
Reform on Contract: The Viceroyalties of Sir Henry Sidney, 1566-1578p. 113
Interlude: Government in Ireland, 1536-1579p. 159
The Impact of Reform Government, 1556-1583p. 167
Reform Government and the Feudal Magnatesp. 169
Reform Government and the Community of the Palep. 209
Reform Government and Gaelic Irelandp. 245
Epilogue: Reform in Crisis: The Viceroyalty of Sir John Perrot, 1584-1588p. 291
Bibliographyp. 301
Indexp. 317
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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