Catalogue


The Caribbean slave [electronic resource] : a biological history /
Kenneth F. Kiple.
imprint
Cambridge [Cambridgeshire] ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1984.
description
xiii, 274 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0521268745
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Cambridge [Cambridgeshire] ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1984.
isbn
0521268745
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
general note
Continues: Another dimension to the Black diaspora. 1981.
Includes index.
catalogue key
8358313
 
Bibliography: p. 259-265.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1986-02:
Like its predecessor, Kiple's Another Dimension to the Black Diaspora (1981), this book is based on the highly speculative reading of a rich variety of secondary and archival sources, with an emphasis on the former. Covering the period from the 16th century to the present (and therefore a study of far more than the Caribbean slave), Kiple analyzes the diet and diseases that plagued Africans in both Africa and the New World. The severe deficiencies of diet, especially in vitamins and minerals, predisposed the populations to certain types of diseases. Malnutrition from lack of protein accounted for an inordinately high infant and child mortality rate in the Caribbean, while a combination of genetic and pathogenic factors produced susceptibilities and immunities that largely explain the illnesses of Africans throughout the Americas. Black resistance to some epidemics, such as yellow fever and malaria, reinforced the racist view that they were different from whites, and possibly inferior. Although informed and informative, Kiple's work fails to be as persuasive as Barry Higman's Slave Populations of the British Caribbean (CH, Dec '84) and frequently raises questions that are not answered. The difficulties of generalizing across time and space are not well handled, but the work is, nevertheless, an important contribution. Upper-division undergraduates and beyond.-F.W. Knight, Johns Hopkins University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, February 1986
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Summaries
Description for Bookstore
This study focuses on the black biological experience in slavery, in the Caribbean. The study closes with a look at the continuing demographic difficulties of the black West Indian from the abolition of slavery.
Description for Library
This study focuses on the black biological experience in slavery, in the Caribbean. Using the general health and level of nutrition of the island whites as a control, Kiple pays especially close attention to the role that nutrition played in the development of diseases. The study closes with a look at the continuing demographic difficulties of the black West Indian from the abolition of slavery.
Main Description
This study focuses on the black biological experience in slavery, in the Caribbean. It begins with a consideration of the rapidly changing disease environment after the arrival of the Spaniards; it also looks at the slave ancestors in their West African homeland and examines the ways in which the nutritional and disease environments of that area had shaped its inhabitants. In a particularly innovative chapter, he considers the epidemiological and pathological consequences of the middle passage for newly enslaved blacks. The balance of the book is devoted to the health of the black slave in the West Indies. Using the general health and level of nutrition of the island whites as a control, Kiple pays especially close attention to the role that nutrition played in the development of diseases. The study closes with a look at the continuing demographic difficulties of the black West Indian from the abolition of slavery.
Table of Contents
List of tables
Preface
Acknowledgments
Background and Biology: Introduction
The peoples and their pathogens
West African diet and disease
The parameters of West African survival
Diet, Disease, and Demography: Introduction
The middle passage and malnutrition
Plantation nutrition
Malnutrition: morbidity and mortality
Slave demography
Slave infant and child mortality
Black diseases and white medicine
Pathogens and Politics: Introduction
Fevers and race
Epilogue: diet, disease, and displacement
Notes
Bibliographic essay
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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