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The Byzantine theocracy [electronic resource] /
Steven Runciman.
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1977.
description
viii, 197 p. ; 20 cm.
ISBN
0521214017 :
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1977.
isbn
0521214017 :
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8358208
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Description for Bookstore
Sir Steven Runciman's Weil lectures trace the various ways in which the Emperor tried to put the theory into practice - and thus the changing relationship between church and state - from the days of the first Constantine to those of the eleventh. The theocratic constitution remained virtually unchanged during those eleven centuries.
Description for Library
The constitution of the Byzantine Empire was based on the conviction that it was the earthly copy of the Kingdom of Heaven. This was the theory, but in practice the state was never free from its Roman past, particularly the Roman law, and its heritage of Greek culture. These lectures trace the various ways in which the Emperor tried to put the theory into practice - and thus the changing relationship between church and state - from the days of the first Constantine to those of the eleventh. The theocratic constitution remained virtually unchanged during those eleven centuries.
Main Description
The constitution of the Byzantine Empire was based on the conviction that it was the earthly copy of the Kingdom of Heaven. Just as God ruled in Heaven, so the Emperor, made in his image, should rule on earth and carry out his commandments. This was the theory, but in practice the state was never free from its Roman past, particularly the Roman law, and its heritage of Greek culture. Sir Steven Runciman's Weil lectures trace the various ways in which the Emperor tried to put the theory into practice - and thus the changing relationship between church and state - from the days of the first Constantine to those of the eleventh. The theocratic constitution remained virtually unchanged during those eleven centuries. No other constitution in the Christian era has endured for so long.
Table of Contents
Foreword, Introduction
The christian empire: the image of God upon earth
The viceroy of God: the plenitude of imperial power
The battle over images: the challenge of popular belief
The working compromise: the limits of imperial control
The monks and the people: the oppo-position to the palace and the hierarchy
Decline and fall: the end of the Kingdom of God on earth
Notes
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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