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Business interest groups in nineteenth-century Brazil [electronic resource] /
Eugene Ridings.
imprint
Cambridge [England] ; New York, NY, USA : Cambridge University Press, 1994.
description
xiv, 377 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0521454859
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Cambridge [England] ; New York, NY, USA : Cambridge University Press, 1994.
isbn
0521454859
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8358194
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 339-364) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1995-04:
Ridings focuses on the "commercial associations" that brought together the principals involved in the export-import trade, which was the backbone of the Brazilian economy in the 19th century. The first and most important of these, the Commercial Association of Rio de Janeiro, was established in 1834. A large percentage of the commercial associations' members were not Brazilians. To a very considerable degree, Brazilian foreign trade was carried on by merchants from the UK, Germany, Italy, Portugal, and the US. Until the last two decades of the 19th century, the foreign influence in the commercial associations did not reduce their effectiveness. Of course, the principal task of these associations was to defend the interests of the country's exporters and importers. In defending the export trade, they also were often the major spokespersons for the country's agricultural interests, which helps explain their defense of the large landholding system and slavery. These commercial associations also lobbied heavily for such things as railroads, the telegraph, and transoceanic cable; in addition, they assumed tasks that subsequently were carried out by the government. The author concludes that the commercial associations contributed considerably to the 19th-century development of the Brazilian economy, so long as it continued to be based on the export-import trade. But he further concludes that they hampered the beginnings of the country's industrialization, and because of concentration of attention on its own particular region of Brazil, a commercial association paid little attention to the development of a national market and economy. For readers interested in Latin American history and economic development, upper-division undergraduate and up. R. J. Alexander; Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick
Reviews
Review Quotes
"...an important contribution to the literature on Brazilian economic history. It goes a long way toward the development of a literature on the political economy of the monarchy (a subject about which we know amazingly little) and lays out the basic issues that future scholars will want to address in more detail." Journal of Economic Literature
"Ridings not only illuminates a great number of historical crannies of interest to the Brazilianist historian, but also raises important issues for understanding the course of Brazil's overall economic history." Richard Graham, Book Reviews
"Solid archival research in Brazil and the United Kingdom, together with exhaustive consultation of government documents, contemporary journals and newspapers, and secondary printed sources provide the authority to make this the definitive history of business interest groups between 1834 and 1900." International History Review
"The range of materials and hypotheses presented make this an important contribution to the study of nineteenth-century business and political history." Canadian Journal of History
"This carefully crafted work fills an important gap in the literature."Muriel Nazzari, American Historical Review
"This is an illuminating study....this important monograph provides a comprehensive portrait of a significant sector of Brazilian economic society during a formative period in the nation's history. The product of two decades of extensive reasearch, Riding's work should add new perspective to the debate on Brazil's nineteenth-century development and why it took the direction it did." The Americas
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, April 1995
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Description for Bookstore
This book is the first to describe the role of business interest groups, also known as pressure groups, in the development of Brazil during the nineteenth century. Business interest groups strongly affected the modernization and prosperity of agriculture, the pace of industrialisation, and patterns of communications.
Description for Library
This book is the first to describe the role of business interest groups, also known as pressure groups, in the development of Brazil during the nineteenth-century. Business interest groups strongly affected the modernisation and prosperity of agriculture, the pace of industrialisation, and patterns of communications. Although they sometimes initiated enterprises themselves, they most affected development by influencing the scope and direction of government aid. The most important of business interest groups, the commercial associations, also may be seen as institutions through which ties of dependency to better-developed nations overseas were maintained.
Main Description
The political will of the business elite of nineteenth-century Brazil was expressed most clearly and forcefully through its organized interest groups (also known as pressure groups). Traditional advisory and regulatory prerogatives, lack of competing interest groups, and unexcelled access to government gave Brazilian business interest groups in the nineteenth century power unequaled by such organizations today. They affected development mainly by influencing the scope and direction of government support. This book examines their role in development and, through them, the business elite that they represented. Business interest groups assumed much responsibility for the welfare of Brazilian agriculture. They tried to upgrade the quality of agricultural exports and helped market them, fought export taxation, and attempted to arrange cheap, ready rural credit. Several groups also tried to ensure agriculture's labor supply by defending slavery. Through their prerogative of advising on tariffs and through participation in the debate over economic liberalism, business interest groups strongly affected the pace of industrialization. By introducing new systems of communications, they helped determine Brazil's communications infrastructure. They also aided the young Brazilian state in economic and urban integration. Lastly, the most important of the business interest groups, the commercial associations, also may be seen as institutions through which ties of dependency to better developed nations overseas were maintained.
Main Description
This book is the first to describe the role of business interest groups, also known as pressure groups, in the development of Brazil during the nineteenth-century. Business interest groups strongly affected the modernization and prosperity of agriculture, the pace of industrialisation, and patterns of communications. Although they sometimes initiated enterprises themselves, they most affected development by influencing the scope and direction of government aid. The most important of business interest groups, the commercial associations, also may be seen as institutions through which ties of dependency to better-developed nations overseas were maintained.
Table of Contents
Introduction
The Genesis of Brazilian Business Interest Groups
Leadership and Organisation
Influence, Ideology, and Public Relations
The Export Economy: Agricultural Quality, Markets, and Profits
The Export Economy: Banking, Credit, and Currency
The Export Economy: Manpower
Taxation
Industrialisation
Communications: Regionalism Perpetuated
Port Areas and Harbors: Efficiency and Rivalry
Business Interest Groups and Economic and Urban Integration
Business Interest Groups and the Republic
Conclusion
Notes
Bibliography
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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