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British satire and the politics of style, 1789-1832 [electronic resource] /
Gary Dyer.
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1997.
description
xii, 263 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0521563577 (hardcover)
format(s)
Book
More Details
author
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1997.
isbn
0521563577 (hardcover)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8358088
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 198-250) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1998-07:
Dyer's study of post-Augustan satiric practice should challenge those literary histories that insist the most important observation that can be made about satiric poetry in the Romantic period is that with few exceptions, the genre declines and dies out. Dyer (Brandeis Univ.) suggests otherwise. He surveys hundreds of satirical poems and prose narratives published in the period and shows how Romantic satire functioned differently than either 18th-century satire or its classical antecedents. This difference is most clearly evident in what the author calls "radical satire," which he defines as ironic or parodic and pluralist and internationalist. Dyer considers John Walcot ("Peter Pindar"), the "quintessential poet of opposition," to be one such writer of radical verse satire, along with Leigh Hunt and Shelly. However, the majority of writers he treats are seldom read and little known. Dyer does not claim excellence for the satiric poems of the period but concentrates on revealing their satiric meaning and significance in social and political contexts. Thus, his study will interest cultural and gender studies audiences. Furthermore, the chronologically arranged bibliography of hundreds of volumes of satiric verses of the Romantic period will be especially useful to readers wishing to survey this heretofore neglected literature. Recommended for upper-division undergraduates through faculty. S. Pathak; Virginia Commonwealth University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"...a convincing case for the ongoing importance of Johnson's example as an access to central issues in eighteenth-century studies." Helen Deutsch, Modern Philology
"British Satire and the Politics of Style is a worthwhile book, a useful introduction to a neglected body of writing...Dyer's is a valuable study...a very welcome contribution." Studies in Romanticism
"Dyer's book is an important beginning to a needed reappraisal of Romantic satire. His mapping of the field establishes benchmarks from which future studies will profit." David A. Kent, Romantic Circles Reviews
"Every student of the period will fond something to discover in this list, and anyone who has worked along the fringes of the Romantic Canon will appreciate the hard work and scrupulous scholarship it represents." Wordsworth Circle
"...Gary Dyer's British Satire and the Politics of Style, 1789-1832 makes a much needed contribution to our sense of the period." Studies in English Literature, 1500-1900
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, July 1998
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Satire in the Romantic period was a major genre with a wide readership. Dyer looks at issues such as the tactics satirists used to deflect prosecution for sedition, and the ramifications for women writers of satire's 'masculine' connotations.
Description for Bookstore
Gary Dyer breaks new ground by surveying and interpreting hundreds of satirical poems and prose narratives published in Britain during the Romantic period. He shows that satire was a major and widely read genre, and includes a bibliography of more than 700 volumes containing satirical verses.
Description for Bookstore
Gary Dyer breaks new ground by surveying and interpreting hundreds of satirical poems and prose narratives published in Britain during the Romantic period. These works have been neglected by literary scholars, satisfied that satire disappeared in the late eighteenth century. Dyer argues that satire continued to be a major and widely-read genre, and that contemporary political and social conflicts gave new meanings to conventions inherited from classical Rome and eighteenth-century England. He adds a bibliography of more than 700 volumes containing satirical verses.
Description for Library
Gary Dyer surveys and interprets hundreds of satirical poems and prose narratives published in Britain during the Romantic period. These works have been neglected by literary scholars, satisfied that satire disappeared in the late eighteenth century. Dyer argues that satire continued to be a major and widely-read genre, and that contemporary political and social conflicts gave new meanings to conventions inherited from classical Rome and eighteenth-century England. The book includes a bibliography of more than 700 volumes containing satirical verses.
Main Description
Gary Dyer breaks new ground by surveying and interpreting hundreds of satirical poems and prose narratives published in Britain during the Romantic period. These works have been neglected by literary scholars, satisfied that satire disappeared in the late eighteenth century. Dyer argues that satire continued to be a major and widely-read genre, and that contemporary political and social conflicts gave new meanings to conventions inherited from classical Rome and eighteenth-century England. He includes a bibliography of more than 700 volumes containing satirical verses.
Main Description
This book surveys and interprets the hundreds of satirical poems and prose narratives published in Britain during the Romantic period. Although satire was a major genre with a wide readership, such works have been largely neglected by literary scholars, satisfied that satire disappeared in the late eighteenth century. Paying as much attention to now-forgotten figures like John Wolcot ('Peter Pindar') and Jane Taylor as to Byron, Gary Dyer argues that contemporary political and social conflicts gave new meanings to conventions of satire inherited from classical Rome and eighteenth-century England. Situating these satires in their cultural and material context sheds light on issues such as the tactics satirists used to deflect prosecution for sedition, and the ramification for women writers of satire's 'masculine' connotations. The book includes a bibliography of more than 700 volumes containing satirical verses.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgements
Note on the text
Introduction
The scope of satire, 1789-1832
The modes of satire and the politics of style
The meaning of Radical verse satire
Peacock, Disraeli, and the satirical prose narrative
Satire displaced, satire domesticated
Notes
Works cites
A Select Bibliography of British satirical verse, 1789-1832
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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