Catalogue


Before Newton [electronic resource] : the life and times of Isaac Barrow /
edited by Mordechai Feingold.
imprint
Cambridge [England] ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1990.
description
xi, 380 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0521306949
format(s)
Book
More Details
added author
imprint
Cambridge [England] ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1990.
isbn
0521306949
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8357733
 
"A catalogue of the bookes of Dr Isaac Barrow ...": p. 341-372.
Includes bibliographical references.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1991-01:
A first book about Barrow, who was not only Isaac Newton's much senior colleague at Trinity College, Cambridge, but, in his day, was known as much for his theology as for his science. Regius Professor of Greek, Barrow was named the first Lucasian Professor of Mathematics and later became Master of Trinity College, Cambridge. The opening chapter by editor Feingold captures the essence of Barrow's importance as "divine, scholar, mathematician." Alan Shapiro examines Barrow's optical lectures and the foundations of the theory of optical imagery. Michael Mahoney covers Barrow's mathematics, "between ancients and moderns," dispelling many myths in the process, including the oft-repeated claim that Barrow was Newton's teacher/tutor. Mahoney also argues persuasively that Barrow did not present an early version of the Newton-Leibniz calculus. John Gascoigne discusses the academic milieu, "Interregnum and Restoration Cambridge," while Anthony Grafton looks at Barrow the scholar and Irene Simon examines "the preacher." Feingold's essay on Barrow's library closes the book. A scholarly, carefully researched book for all students of 17th-century intellectual history and history of science. -J. W. Dauben, Herbert H. Lehman College, CUNY
Reviews
Review Quotes
"...a model worthy of emulation. By focusing the attention of scholars on a single object--a theme...or a particularly representative figure...such a volume refreshes and revives the scholarly debate. Feingold and the Cambridge Universiy Press deserve our plaudits." Robert H. Kargon, Albion
"...an interesting case study of the seventeenth-century culture which produced modern science. An excellent book for any scholar interested in a more detailed understanding of the early development of science in general and Isaac Barrow's contributions in particular." Perceptual and Motor Skills
"A scholarly, carefully researched book for all students of 17th-century intellectual history and history of science." Choice
"Barrow emerges as an interesting person living in interesting times, and Feingold's book captures this in a scholarly manner." Tom McMullen, Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, January 1991
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Summaries
Description for Bookstore
A comprehensive re-evaluation of Isaac Barrow (1630-1677), one of the more prominent and intriguing of all seventeenth-century men of science. Barrow is remembered today - if at all - only as Sir Isaac Newton's mentor and patron, but he in fact made important contributions to the disciplines of optics and geometry.
Description for Library
A comprehensive reevaluation of Isaac Barrow (1630-1677), one of the more prominent and intriguing of all seventeenth-century men of science. Barrow is remembered today--if at all--only as Sir Isaac Newton's mentor and patron, but he in fact made important contributions to the disciplines of optics and geometry. Moreover, he was a prolific and influential preacher as well as a renowned classical scholar. By seeking to understand Barrow's mathematical work, primarily within the confines of the pre-Newtonian scientific framework, the book offers a substantial rethinking of his scientific acumen.
Main Description
A comprehensive reevaluation of Isaac Barrow (1630-1677), one of the more prominent and intriguing of all seventeenth-century men of science. Barrow is remembered today--if at all--only as Sir Isaac Newton's mentor and patron, but he in fact made important contributions to the disciplines of optics and geometry. Moreover, he was a prolific and influential preacher as well as a renowned classical scholar. By seeking to understand Barrow's mathematical work, primarily within the confines of the pre-Newtonian scientific framework, the book offers a substantial rethinking of his scientific acumen. In addition to providing a biographical study of Barrow, it explores the intimate connections among his scientific, philological, and religious worldviews in an attempt to convey the complexity of the seventeenth-century culture that gave rise to Isaac Barrow, a breed of polymath that would become increasingly rare with the advent of modern science.
Table of Contents
List of contributors
Editor's preface
Isaac Barrow: divine, scholar, mathematician
The Optical Lectures and the foundations of the theory of optical imagery
Barrow's mathematics: between ancients and moderns
Isaac Barrow's academic milieu: Interregnum and Restoration Cambridge
Barrow as a scholar
The preacher
Isaac Barrow's library
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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